We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (2023)

Pte Kyle Adams, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (1)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Croesyceiliog, Torfaen

Died: 06 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when his Jackal armoured vehicle was hit by an explosion and small-arms fire, alongside two comrades, Cpl Kevin Mulligan and L/Cpl Dale Hopkins. It was his first patrol

His mother Moira: “Although Kyle was killed at the tender age of 21, he felt that earning his maroon beret and becoming a Para was an amazing personal triumph. Kyle had the most amazing smile, even his eyes smiled."

His father John, himself an ex-soldier: “He just wanted to be in the field, he kept saying ‘I just want to be out on patrol’.

“I was the last person in the family to speak to him. He phoned about 12 o'clock at night, he said he was excited about the patrol. I spoke to him for about 20 minutes, he asked about the family, I said the family were OK and I said, ‘It's OK son’ and I said, ‘remember your Dad is always beside you’.”

“He was always an outdoor boy, that's what he wanted - he couldn’t work in an office. Almost from the moment he could walk he wanted to be a cricket player. Later, he was taken on a day course to live the Army life. As soon as he saw that, that was him. But it had to be the Parachute Regiment - he only wanted to be a Paratrooper.

“One thing I will always remember is that when he was home on his last R&R, he came up to me and said: ‘Dad, I’m not a soldier, I’m a Para’.

“They are very, very together. They are very tight-knit. That’s what Kyle liked. He loved his family - his sisters Jacqueline and Dawn, his grandparents and his uncle Ken - and he adored his girlfriend, Charlene, but when he came home he wanted to be with his friends too, he loved his Regiment.”

“Was I worried? I didn't let him know it because that's the worst thing you can do. We were all worried but we gave him our blessing.

“When you meet the other families you look at each other and think, our sons are the true heroes. The word hero is used far, far too easily but these boys who put their lives on the line for us, to keep us safe, they are the real heroes.”

L/Cpl Jake Alderton, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (2)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Bexley, London

Died: 09 November 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: His vehicle left the road while crossing a bridge. L/Cpl Alderton was pronounced dead at the scene. Two others were injured

His mother Lesley: "Jake was the last soldier to be killed before Remembrance Sunday. I didn’t think I’d ever laugh or smile again and, in fact, the first time I laughed again was remembering something he said. You just can’t help it remembering Jake, he was just so comical. When he was four we were on the Tube sitting next to a city gent writing in a pad and Jake said, 'We’ve got a pen like that' and the man said, 'Have you? I’m going to shut this up now.' And Jake said, 'No, you shut up.' The poor man looked completely stunned. In secondary school when he was about 14, he played a dog in his school play and got in trouble for cocking his leg up on stage as if he was doing a wee. He told me, 'Well, what else does a dog do?' My mum laughed so hard. They had exactly the same sense of humour. Jake always had a smile on his face. Even as a baby he would giggle as I rocked him to sleep whilst singing him a lullaby. He will be forever loved and missed by his family, friends and comrades. Never forgotten. My boy, Jake."

Rfn Peter Aldridge, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (3)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Folkestone, Kent

Died: 22 January 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED after coming under fire while on foot patrol

His family: "Our son died a hero, he lost his life doing what he believed in. Peter said, ‘If I’m going to die I want to die a soldier’. Our son joined the Army as a Rifleman in the Royal Green Jackets and he didn’t want to be anything else. He was determined to get his first tour of duty under his belt. He believed in the Army and was proud of his job and we are so proud of you Peter. We would like to thank our family, friends and the Army for being there to support us in our time of need. Peter leaves behind his girlfriend, Jem, and his brother, Matthew, who he loved with all his heart. We love you Sweet Pea. Swift and Bold Forever."

Rfn William Aldridge, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (4)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Bromyard, Herefordshire

Died: 10 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed in action by an IED

Maj Alistair Field, Officer Commanding C Company 2 Rifles: "Although new to my company for the Afghanistan tour, Rfn Aldridge had impressed me from the outset. Well-mannered, well-turned out and very much a thinking Rifleman. Such was his stature he reminded me of an old Platoon Sergeant friend of mine from 2RGJ. There is no doubt in my mind that Rfn Aldridge could have gone all the way. We were injured together in the first explosion. We were both injured and in shock together but he comforted me with his patience and kind words. Sadly his life was snatched by another explosion on the way back to the FOB. Another new talent, whose potential will tragically never be known."

Rfn Wilson: “Will and I have known each other from training, and he hasn’t changed since then. He’s always been a happy, loving and very proud soldier. We have so many good memories together before coming out to Afghanistan – like him trying to use my bath as his bed after a good night out! He will always be on my mind and in my thoughts, as will his family and friends.”

RM Sam Alexander, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (5)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

Medals / Military Awards: Military Cross

From: Hammersmith, London

Died: 27 May 2011

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

His mother Serena: "Sam’s zest for life, courage and initiative were evident from an early age. As he grew through adolescence into early adulthood, his adventurous spirit took him further afield and the stories that spread became legend amongst his peers. As well as adventure, Sam was also driven by a love of helping others. He joined the Royal Marines in 2006. When asked why, he said had we heard what was happening in Afghanistan. The Taliban were preventing girls from going to school. 'My mother has a degree and my sister has a degree,' Sam said. 'Every woman has the right to an education.' 'Is it worth dying for?' we asked. 'Yes'. In his first tour of Afghanistan, Sam’s unit was ambushed and his troop commander seriously injured. Sam held off the insurgents, first with his machine gun, and then at close range with his pistol, as the casualties were moved to safety. As a result, he was awarded a Military Cross for gallantry from the Queen in December 2009. On his second tour in 2011, Sam was killed as a result of a remotely operated IED, alongside Lt Ollie Augustin. We have lost our hero but Sam will never be forgotten by his family and friends – and the women of Afghanistan have won a very special guardian angel for all eternity."

Rfn Philip Allen, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (6)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Dorchester, Dorset

Died: 07 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED

His mother Karen Charman-Allen: "I would like to thank all of the soldiers who have served with and knew Phil. He was proud to have been a soldier in 2 RIFLES and to have served on tour with them in Afghanistan."

Rfn Jonathon Allott, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (7)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Bournemouth, Dorset

Died: 05 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died following an IED blast while on a foot patrol

His family: "Jonny died a hero doing the job he loved - he will be sorely missed by the whole family and all who knew him. He had a wish that his brothers could have shared his experiences with him. Jonathon couldn’t wait to get home and wear his medal with pride."

Sgt John Paxton Amer, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (8)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Coldstream Guards

From: Tyne and Wear, Sunderland

Died: 30 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Died of wounds sustained in an explosion

His widow Sue: "Almost five years on and I can still take myself back to that afternoon when I was informed John had been killed. My world, our world stopped, we no longer had a future, no more opportunities to make memories as a family. The pain of losing a loved one never goes away. My daughter and I will remain forever proud of John’s actions on that day, he died doing a job that he loved. Everyone who knew John would agree he had an infectious personality, a gentle man who brought joy and laughter to all who had the great fortune of meeting him."

Flt Sgt Gary Andrews, 48

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (9)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Fochabers, Moray

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His father Peter: ''Although he was getting on in years, he was very young in his approach to life – a very bubbly personality. He just loved life. I can’t put it any other way. He thought a lot of his family and he’d do anything for his wife and children. He was interested in all things mechanical and scientific.

''I still see it as being a bit of a waste – a waste of a number of people’s lives. But it can’t be helped. The inquest certainly brought to light a lot of things which might not have come to light had the accident not occurred. You just hope that people have learned lessons from it. About the sacrifice made by the British Armed Forces.

''You do notice because there’s a gap in your family that wasn’t there before. We had two sons. One of them is now not there. Obviously time mellows things a bit but I do feel it was a waste, really.

''I often remember Gary from his school days. He was a very inquisitive child. I remember I once got a phone call from my wife asking me to contact the headmistress of his school. He’d apparently taken a pair of pliers to school and cut a piece of wire that was running up the side of a building. He wanted the wire for something he was working on with bells and lights. It turned out he'd cut the school telephone line. I remember sitting there, in the headmistress’s study with him, as she said: 'You could have been electrocuted, Gary.' 'Oh no,' Gary said. 'It’s only carrying 50 volts.' He was seven at the time.''

Fsr Simon Annis, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (10)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

From: Salford, Greater Manchester

Died: 16 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Died in an explosion while on patrol

His Commanding Officer Lt Col Rob Thomson: "He was a huge man. I used to encounter him on my way to breakfast on an almost daily basis, where he ate more than any one man could possibly eat, and he used to stop me and ask me if I was OK. He used to carry far more than his normal share on patrol. He was always laughing and used to lighten the mood in the darkest of times, often by breaking into particularly tuneless song.”

Lt Alan Williamson: “I spent three weeks scuba diving in Belize with Fsr Annis. He was the centre of attention for the entire trip. On his 21st birthday night out in San Pedro he even managed to befriend some American tourists and convinced them to buy him drinks for most of the night.

His friend Fsr James Burke, recalling Annis' stag night: "It was one of the best nights of my life. Though I can’t remember much about it. Reading the eulogy at his vigil service was one of the hardest things I've ever done, but one of the proudest."

Every year, the Cadishead Rhinos, the rugby league team of which Simon Annis was an enthusiastic junior member, take on the Buxton Bulls in an annual challenge game for the Simon Annis Cup. The game is staged as near as possible to the anniversary of his death. This August, the Bulls beat the Rhinos in a game which was described as being “as feisty as the man after whom it is named”. Eight hundred pounds was raised for the Simon Addis Foundation, a charity set up in his memory by his parents.

Rfn Carlo Apolis, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (11)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Exeter, Originally from South Africa

Died: 01 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Shot while on foot patrol

His family: "Death leaves a heartache that no one can heal, love leaves a memory that no one steal until you turn on to God, to take away the pain.

"Carlo was a strong, open-minded and direct person. He was not afraid to tell people what he thought about them or about any topic. We tell it like this because we feel it's better to be completely honest. He cared about people, tried to help them as much as he could in any way. He had a good sense of humour. He loved to meet people from around the world, to learn new things, and that inspired him to travel the world. That gentle smiling face would always light up and he would provide a sense of humor whenever it was needed at home. 'Your memories are forever in our hearts and minds. We miss you. Mommy, Pappie, Sisters and Duelan."

L/Cpl James Ashworth, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (12)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

Medals / Military Awards: Victoria Cross

From: Kettering, Northamptonshire

Died: 13 June 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed in grenade attack while on patrol

His mother Kerry: "I miss his smile. He's got the best smile anyone could ever have; he always smiles... and his hugs. I just love him so much. [The Victoria Cross] doesn't make it easier but it does make it feel that it wasn't for nothing. He was making a difference out there and James believed in his job. We just miss him so much, but this award is not just for James it's for everybody who fights and who has been injured and the whole town is so proud of him."

Gdsmn David Atherton, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (13)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Manchester

Died: 26 July 2007

Location: Helmand, Mirmandab

Incident: Shot on the third day of an operation against Taliban

His Section Commander L Sgt Robert Pancott: "David was known to everyone as Jaffa. I couldn’t have asked for a better soldier. He was always first to volunteer and he never let anything get him down. He loved to be at the forefront of any banter and he would always be cracking jokes, usually at everyone else’s expense! Jaffa was one of the characters that make Army life so enjoyable."

Lt Ollie Augustin, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (14)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Dartford, Kent

Died: 27 May 2011

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

His parents Sean and Jane, and sister, Sarah: "Ollie was 23 years old when he was killed by an IED in Afghanistan. It was his first tour. He was killed doing a job he loved but this loss has left a gaping hole in our lives. He had become a fine man and a fine Royal Marine. He possessed many qualities, all of which are a pre-requisite to being a Royal Marine. He was intelligent, funny, loyal, moral, honest and hardworking. He was also very modest and would be embarrassed by these comments. He wrote in a diary that he wanted to make us proud. Well, we were proud of you Ollie every day of your life. Not only for the big achievements but for the small every day things as well. Whatever he set his mind to he did 100 per cent. The men in his troop became his family and in the short time he was their troop commander he did his utmost to make decisions in their best interests. For us, Ollie’s parents, for his sister, grandfather, aunts and uncles, cousins and friends, this has been too high a price to pay. We pray it was not the ultimate sacrifice given in vain and that the fragile peace in Afghanistan continues as the withdrawal goes ahead."

Tpr Ratu Babakobau, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (15)

Service: Army

Regiment: Household Cavalry Regiment

From: , Fiji

Died: 02 May 2008

Location: Helmand, Now Zad

Incident: Killed after his vehicle hit a landmine during a routine patrol

His Sqn Ldr Maj Will Bartle-Jones: "Tpr ‘Baba’ Babakobau was a rising star of the Household Cavalry and, in particular, D Squadron. He made an instant impact on arrival from the Mounted Regiment, with his unrivalled professionalism, thirst for knowledge and truly Trojan prowess on the rugby pitch.

"He displayed a great deal of humility which belied his capabilities as an armoured vehicle driver and he took a great deal of personal pride in his work. He was highly respected by all ranks, across both Regiments, tipped to be one of the first Fijian SNCOs, with responsibility he would have revelled in, and with the chance to show his myriad of talents. All junior soldiers looked up to him as the model of a strong junior leader, with an exceptionally deft touch with new soldiers who quickly warmed to his strong personality.

"Equally at home on a horse as in a fighting vehicle, he upheld traditional standards, strong personal beliefs and a sense of immense fun. He was desperate to go on operations in order to improve the lives of those less fortunate than himself and he gave his life so selflessly in pursuit of this cause.

"I have been immensely privileged to have had such a strong character within D Squadron, to have served alongside him and enjoyed the many humorous moments that so endeared him to all within the Squadron and Regiment.

"Our thoughts and prayers are very much with his wife and children in Windsor, but also his extended family in Fiji at this immensely difficult time. His loss is a huge tragedy; however his selflessness will drive the remainder of us forward to ensure we achieve our aims and remember him as a stalwart member of this close-knit Squadron and Regiment."

Capt Ben Babington- Browne, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (16)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Engineers

From: Maidstone, Kent

Died: 06 July 2009

Location: Zabul Province

Incident: A Canadian army helicopter crashed after take-off, no enemy fire was involved

His friend Capt Helen Stamp: "Since losing Ben five years ago, life has been a duller place. Ben was tragically killed in a helicopter crash whilst serving his country. The last memory I have of him is a phone call from Afghanistan where he was in a particularly upbeat and positive mood. Predictably everything Ben did was filled with positivity, and he could be relied upon to find amusement in everything we did in the Army.

"My two years spent with him on basic training were the best of times. Whether it was passing notes to each other in class, discussing 'what happened at the weekend' or trudging through the night on patrol, he would always find a way to lighten the mood. His zest for life was infectious, and I remember a particularly amusing ski trip to Les Deux Alpes in France where he decided that we should wear our best Officers Mess Kit on the ski slopes to celebrate the start of 2007. We drew many looks from confused skiers, but as ever he carried it off with the greatest of ease. We loved this ski trip so much, especially the local crepes, that we spent the next month discussing how we would escape from training to drive down to France to pick up takeaway crepes. All of this seemed to be within our grasp: although to most would have been a ridiculous idea, I, and many others, would have followed Ben anywhere.

"A consummate professional and undeniably charismatic leader, he was the epitome of what a modern day Army Officer should be. Fiercely intelligent and supportive, he was a loyal and utterly dependable friend. He approached each day with a determination that it would be a great day, finding hilarity in all that was thrown at him. On that tragic day in July 2009, I lost a best friend, and the world lost a character. He is an example to us all of what can be achieved in such a short space of time. He is missed every day by those that knew him but the memories never fade."

Rfn James Backhouse, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (17)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Castleford, Yorkshire

Died: 10 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed in action by an IED

Rfn David Kendall: "I first met Rfn Backhouse in training. He was always the quiet, thoughtful one and until you got to know him you didn't realise how switched on he really was. He was always friendly and a big, kind-hearted bloke."

Rfn Kevin Holt: "He loved his sports and his nights out with the lads. He died for his country, which he loved, and is a hero in my eyes, and should be in the rest of the country's eyes. I'll never forget you James and I'm proud to say I knew you."

L/Cpl Jordan Bancroft, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (18)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Burnley, Lancashire

Died: 21 August 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by small arms fire while providing security at a meeting between local elders and Afghan troops

His Major, Jon Fry: "He was an utterly professional and highly capable man with an infectious sense of humour who enjoyed life to the full – an all-round good bloke. He was a key, and extremely popular, member of the company who always looked out for his mates; as a result he was highly regarded by all, regardless of rank. He had an aura which produced a calming influence on all those around him. I could not have asked for more from one of my Junior Non-Commissioned Officers.

"During the build-up to, and whilst serving, in Afghanistan, L/Cpl Bancroft proved to be one of the strongest junior non-commissioned officers in the company. In pre-deployment training he worked tirelessly to nurture the younger soldiers under his command and fully absorbed himself in any training opportunity available. On Operation Herrick he found himself operating in difficult and dangerous circumstances in an extremely challenging area of operations. But this is what he did best. He took it all in his stride with a courageous and selfless manner, whilst at the same time remained calm and balanced, with a great sense of humour – what more could a commander ask for."

Cpl Jason Barnes, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (19)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Exeter, Devon

Died: 22 July 2008

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: While returning to base after helping evacuate two casualties, his ambulance vehicle hit a suspected roadside bomb

His widow Diana: "I met Jason in October 2004, when I worked with his Dad at Tesco in Exeter. Jason came back from Germany on leave, and his Dad introduced us at 4am during a night shift. Jason texted me the next day and we went for a drink. Not long after that he went on a six-month tour to Iraq. I used to write 30-page letters every week - that’s how we got to know each other, through writing letters. Jason was quite shy. He loved fixing things; he was forever taking things apart and putting them back together again. We got married on October 6 2006, exactly two years after we met. Jason didn’t do flowers because he thought they died too quickly, but he was romantic in his way. I miss his smile the most. He loved to make people smile."

A Cpl David Barnsdale, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (20)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Tring, Hertfordshire

Died: 20 October 2010

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Died while clearing explosive devices

His father Stephen: "David was just a fun-loving guy, he loved sports, either playing football or [watching] QPR. He seemed to make friends in all walks of life and just had that knack of getting on with people. I just remember one moment at the funeral – one of his friends said he is the sort of guy who could make a friend in an empty room.

"We hold a football tournament in his memory each year. This year it was on Sunday, October 12 in his memory and there were 500 people who showed up. There must have been 35 or so soldiers who, four years after his death, turned up for the first time. That summed it up to us.

"It is mainly local friends but a good number of soldiers and the amount of emails we get apologising they can’t make it this year but will come next year… If he had told me he had this many friends before he died, I wouldn’t have believed him.

"We have found it difficult to put it on every year, but we will carry on doing it as long as they keep coming and his friends still want to do it. We have made friends from all walks of life. They all just turn up for this football each year and it is brilliant.

"The other nice thing for us is that a lot of the Army friends who come over seem to interact with the local guys from Tring, so a lot of people have met up because of him, and that started when he first came back from Wootton Bassett. The crowds that were down there – I do remember the pub saying they did not recall seeing such big crowds for just one soldier. I miss him from the football side because we used to go and watch QPR every time he was on leave – I don’t go now, it just doesn’t feel the same without him. I’ve been with my wife and she said, 'This is just wrong, David should be here'. I’m sure I will start watching them again but at the moment it still feels so close."


Capt Walter Barrie, 41

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (21)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Glasgow

Died: 11 November 2012

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali district

Incident: Shot in an "insider attack" by a member of Afghan National Army

His widow Sonia: "Capt Walter Barrie was a great man, a doting and amazing father, and a fantastic husband. He was much loved and will be missed by many."

Sgt Paul Bartlett, 35

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (22)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Royal Marines

From:

Died: 27 June 2006

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in gun battle after raid to capture four Taliban members

His mother Denise Bartlett: "From the age of seven Paul wanted to join the Marines. His father and I don't know where that came from and we thought he would grow out of it. He did love his Action Man as a boy but he was a very placid child, not gung-ho at all.

"He joined the local Army cadets when he was 14, in Barnet, where we lived. He took it really quite seriously; in fact, he took life quite seriously. As he was still adamant in his intention to join the Marines he was determined not to jeopardise that by getting into any trouble. At 17, he passed the Marine entrance tests and embarked on the rigorous training. Although hard, he loved it from the start; the camaraderie, the adventure. He always said that there was never a day he didn't want to go to work. There aren't many of us who could say that.

"He liked cycling and running in his spare time. When he was on leave he would come home and enjoyed socialising with his old friends. These friends were amongst the 500 people who attended his funeral. He passed selection into the SBS in 1997 and was subsequently often sent on hazardous operations throughout the world: Iraq, Northern Ireland, Afghanistan to name a few. He loved Afghanistan, he thought the country was beautiful, he also liked the people and thought they deserved a chance of a better life. He believed in what the UK forces were doing and he wanted to be there. That gives us some comfort.

"Paul was simply the loveliest, funniest, happiest person, our beloved son."

Rfn Samuel John Bassett, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (23)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Plymouth, Devon

Died: 08 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died as a result of an explosion while searching for IEDs

His mother, Coline, and his brother, Jack, wear his dogtags to remember him. Coline said: “Samuel was not only my son, he and his brother Jack are my best friends. Samuel was a real character, always the joker; he will be so, so missed and loved forever - our proud little soldier. He had found his vocation and was fantastically happy.''

“During his last conversation with the family he said he was ‘having the time of his life’ and joked when he spoke to his granddad, whilst sitting on the roof watching the sun go down in Afghanistan, that he was ‘keeping his head down from the snipers’.”

L/Cpl James Bateman, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (24)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Staines, Middlesex

Died: 12 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: One of two soldiers killed after coming under fire while on patrol

His widow Victoria: "I know how he loved the Parachute Regiment and I draw comfort from the fact that he died doing the job he loved, for the country he loved, with the friends he loved. He was a loving husband, brother, son and uncle. I love him and will miss him greatly. He was our hero.”

Flt Sgt Stephen Beattie, 42

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (25)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Dundee

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His widow Shona: "He always wanted to join the RAF and I think he started off in the ATC [Air Training Corps] as a child, then going on to do his private pilot's licence at the Perth aerodrome and then from there went on and was taken into the Air Force.

"The worst thing was the knock on the door... you just never want to experience that. Nothing can prepare you for that, nothing can be worse in life - I hope not - than what we experienced on that Saturday night. He was the best guy you could ever get. He was just such a fantastic husband and a marvellous father. He was a great humorous guy with lots of one-liners that just put everybody into laughter, as well as being a very sensible and stable person at the same time. I will always remember him with the children. He was really a hands-on dad. He would take them on cycle runs, we would go out on walks with the dog, he'd be playing football with Cameron, he'd be teaching the kids how to work the computer. He was such a great guy that nothing will replace him."

WO2 Colin Beckett, 36

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (26)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Parachute Regiment

From: Peterborough, Cambridgeshire

Died: 05 February 2011

Location: Helmand, Near Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an IED

His widow Rachel: "Anyone whoever met or knew Colin, ‘Tom’, would have been touched by him in a big way and he will never be forgotten. He was a fantastic soldier, a great son, a good brother and friend and a truly special husband. My bestest friend, my soulmate, my absolute world. We love him and shall miss him so very much. May his love for life, strength, humour and strong character live on forever in his baby girl Freya."

Flt Sgt Gerard Bell, 48

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (27)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Ely, Cambridge

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

RAF Kinloss Station Commander Gp Capt Jerry Kessell, speaking on the day of the funeral: "It is a very sad day for Moray but a particularly sad one for the family of Flt Sgt Gez Bell. They have lost a loved one who was dedicated to not only them but to all at the station, the Air Force and his country as well."

Pte Martin Bell, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (28)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

Medals / Military Awards: George Medal

From: Bradford, West Yorkshire

Died: 25 January 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an IED while helping an injured colleague

His family: "Martin was proud to be in the Parachute Regiment and serving his country. He served three years as a Police Community Support Officer in West Yorkshire Police before joining the Paras. He has made lots of friends easily at each point of his life’s journey. Martin was extremely close to his two brothers, Oliver and Philip. He had a wicked and infectious sense of humour that would have served him well in difficult times. He was due home on his R&R on February 14. Martin was a well-loved son, grandson, nephew, cousin, uncle and brother. He made us all very proud and he will leave behind a hole in all of our hearts that will never be replaced. He was our best friend, too. We are a very close-knit family and, although we are grieving for his loss, we hope that all the other soldiers keep safe."

Pte Gareth Bellingham, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment Staffords

From: Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire

Died: 18 June 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Shot by insurgents while on patrol

From father Leslie and stepmother Kimberley: "Gareth's loss has left a huge hole in our lives. We will never see him progress in his military career or see him married with a family. He was such a popular young man and his death has affected all of his friends and comrades .All the tributes paid to Gareth after his death show just how much he meant to them.

"When home on leave his phone would never stop ringing. His colleagues would be calling to check on arrangements for returning to base from leave, or details of upcoming exercises when they got back. He would go out of his way to help anyone at any time of the day or night if they needed it.

"Our best memory is his determination to make it back to the UK from Germany for his father's 50th birthday party in January 2011. He did what is known as the 'Fally Calais Rally' – leaving Germany on the Friday afternoon, driving through Germany and France to the ferry and arriving back home in the small hours of Saturday. Attending the party that night and being back at base for the 9.00am parade on the Monday. This was something he refused to miss and it is an occasion we will always remember as it was the last time the whole family was together.

"We miss him every day but are proud that he was doing something he loved when he was killed in action."

A Sgt Sean Binnie, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Dublin, Irish Republic

Died: 07 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala region

Incident: Kiled during a firefight with insurgents

The last voice message Acting Sgt Binnie received before his death in May 2009 was from his parents, telling him how much they loved him. His mother Janette said she and her husband phoned and emailed Acting Sgt Binnie as often as they could when he was serving in Afghanistan. And while on the last occasion when they phoned him he was unable to take their call, they learned that he had listened to their voice message before being killed.

His mother Janette: "The fact he heard that message brings me comfort – that he knew how much we loved him and how proud Allan and I were as he fought on the front line.”

Cpl Marc Birch, 26

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Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Kingsthorpe, Northamptonshire

Died: 12 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin, south of

Incident: Killed in an explosion caused by a 13-year-old suspected suicide bomber

His father-in-law Phil Couldwell: "When Marc first came into our house to take Charlene (his wife) out for the first time it was like somebody had put the light on. He had a fantastic charm about him, along with that cheeky smile. Marc had been a salvation for my little girl since her mum passed away. They bonded together right from the first day they met and it was quite evident that they were right for each other."

Maj Sean Birchall, 33

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Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Guildford, Surrey

Died: 19 June 2009

Location: Helmand, Basharan, near Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

His family: "Sean was very proud of being a Major in the Welsh Guards, and he totally believed in the purpose of the work he was carrying out as a Company Commander in Afghanistan. The five years since he was killed seem to have passed very quickly. His father Brian, his sisters Claire and Katherine, and his brothers Paul and Dominic are all incredibly proud of him, and miss him very much.His mother Maureen was so very proud of him and missed him greatly, but sadly she died two years ago. His graveat Brookwood Military Cemetery is visited every week to lay flowers.A stone plaque bearing his name has been erected alongside the War Memorial in his home village of Cranleigh in Surrey, and a wreath is laid annually at the Remembrance Dayservice in his honour. Such visits andoccasions help provide a lasting memory to him. He is in his family's thoughts every day, with memories of a mischievous little boy, who grew up into a fine young man, and whodeveloped into a very professional Army Officer, who sacrificed his life for us all."

RM Steven James Birdsall, 20

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Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Warrington, Cheshire

Died: 14 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died in hospital in the UK following a fire-fight with insurgents

Lt Col Paul Jamec, Commanding Officer of 40 Commando Group: "He possessed a sharp mind and a big and generous heart. He loved his family, his friends and his fellow Marines, and they adored him in return. He was a consummate professional - forever focused, very proud and utterly dependable, yet always cheerful and magnanimous. He was the perfect Marine.”

Spr William Blanchard, 39

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Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Gosport, Hampshire

Died: 30 October 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by small arms fire while investigating a suspect device

His widow Sue: “It was about six weeks after they had gone out. It was a Saturday and a guy knocked on the door and showed me his ID badge, and he just told me.

"I had just been talking to him two nights before. It was really surreal. I just didn’t believe it, not for quite a while. I knew deep down he was not going to come back but it was a strange few months. Even now I still talk about him and think about his little quirks, and have a laugh or cry. It depends how you are feeling on the day, but it has definitely got better over time. Some things still make you upset, especially the Remembrance Services, and every time you hear Last Post.

“We used to go out on the tandem bike quite a bit, we went to France and tandemed around 200 miles. He would sit at the front, always. He did the gears and everything. Our feet were clipped into the pedals so you couldn’t slack off. I did do that a few times and he’d say, ‘Come on, you’re not working hard enough!’. Now it is all covered in cobwebs. I used to cycle to work but it has dropped off considerably because it was his influence that helped me get outside – one thing he really loved was to be outdoors.

“In 2011, family and friends set up a charity group called Willberforce and we’ve done various things, mainly quite extreme events like Tough Mudder, collecting money for Help for Heroes, which was one of his favourite charities. It seems to get more extreme and madder every year, but it’s got to be because it’s in memory of Will, so it has to be outdoors and as extreme as we can find – that’s what he did.”


Sig Wayne Bland, 21

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Service: Army

Regiment: Signal Regiment

From: Leeds, West Yorkshire

Died: 11 August 2008

Location: Kabul

Incident: Died after a suicide bomber drove a car into his convoy

His brother Jordan: "To my big bro Wayne. He was the best brother anyone could ever have. He always looked after us and we looked after him. I hope he still watches over us, wherever he is. I am so proud of him and all that he has done and I hope I can be like him some day. I love him loads. His little bro, Jordan."

Cpl Stephen Bolger, 30

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Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Cromer, Norfolk

Died: 30 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Died in an explosion while on an operation

His brother Chris: "As a child, Steve was what his mother would fondly call a ‘naughtybugger’. He was the archetypal big brother:protective, caring and free with issuing dead-legs!He was bright and always had his head buried in a book, but, while not from an Army background,alwaysdestined to become a soldier.

"In adult life Steve (aka Ainsley, due to a short spell as a chef before the Army) wasnotoriousfor his 'admin' - or lack of it. Although always professional and dependable at work, whenoff-dutyhe could be comically disorganised.It was not unknown for him to arrive home for Christmas having left theChristmaspresents (and half his clothes) on the train.Yethe was incredibly generous and warm, intelligent and brave, and never asked for anything in return for what he gave.

"Immediately after Steve’s death, the pain was overwhelming and talking about him was very difficult. Althoughwe’re gradually learning to live with this, we miss Steve every day, and wish we had made more of the time we had with him.We'vetried our best to bring something positive out of this; since Steve’s death we've undertaken various charity challenges for Help forHeroesand the British Legion, raising over £12,000in his memory.

"Losing Steve has made our family closer, speaking and meeting up more than before. We’ve shared the worst moments of our lives together and that’s created a very strong bond between us. We meet on the anniversary of his death and on Remembrance Sunday. The latter is particularly important as we also pay our respects to other fallen soldiers in the hope that people will continue to take time to remember Steve and his sacrifice long after we are all gone.

"He'll be remembered as a dear friend, loved brother and son, and excellent soldier."

Spr Elijah Bond, 24

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Engineers

From: St Austell, Cornwall

Died: 08 December 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died from injuries sustained in an IED blast

Elijah’s mother Lizz, father Mark, sisters Kimberley and Bethany, and brothers Isaac and Jose: "Elijah Cooper Bond left the world in the way he chose to live his life. He was a beautiful son, amazing brother, a proud uncle and our best friend. From a wicked grin to a righteous smile, he could light up a room as much as he lit up our lives, so mischievous and fun, yet grounded. He will forever be a piece of us and remain in our hearts.

"We are thankful for the memories we have been given and the precious time we spent with him. We have faith in the sure and certain knowledge that we will be reunited together again. I hope that we can make him as proud as he has made us, and we will remember him with every streak we see in the sky. How many ‘bye byes’ in the sky."

Cpl Darren Bonner, 31

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Gorleston, Norfolk

Died: 28 May 2007

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Died when his convoy was hit by explosives

His mother Christine: "Darren joined the Army when he was 17. He used to get the school bus every morning and, when he was going to join up, he decided that the only way to tell me - because he knew I’d get upset - was to throw a piece of paper at me with it written on and run to the bus. I didn’t want him to join up but you can’t stop them doing what they want to do.

"He was a very bubbly character. Once he’d walked into a room everybody knew he was there. He was a joker and he was such a big character. When the new soldiers came on-board he used to take them under his wing. He was more like a father figure to them. He really was good at his job; a lot of the Colonels used to say they knew they were safe when he was driving them. He was big brother to my three daughters; they’d never known life without Darren. It was a big thing when he died, it took a lot for them to pick themselves up and keep going. He loved Tottenham Hotspur. He used to bike lots, and go over to the gliding club and help out there, and for that they used to take him up in the plane. He just loved that kind of thing."

Acting Cpl Steven Boote, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Military Police

From: Birkenhead, Wirral

Died: 03 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Shin Kalay

Incident: Shot by an Afghan policeman in an unprovoked attack, along with five other British soldiers

His family: "Our son Steven was a wonderful, genuine young man. He would light up a room with a single smile and left a lasting impression on all he met. A son and friend who can never be replaced, but never be removed from our hearts. An only child but never alone, who through family and friends led a full and happy life.

"Emma, his partner, was the love of his life and his soulmate. We couldn’t stop him doing what he believed in, and he did believe he was doing his bit for his country. Steven, we are all so proud of you and you will always be our hero. Look after Nan and Granddad. Goodnight our son, our friend, our life."

Pte Johan Botha, 25

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Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment Worcesters and Foresters

From: Pretoria, South Africa

Died: 08 September 2007

Location: Helmand, Garmsir

Incident: Shot when his patrol came under attack

His Platoon Commander Lt Simon Cupples: "With a physically dominating frame and a loud personality Pte Botha always had a presence wherever he was. He was a confident soldier who helped and guided the younger soldiers. Pte Botha was South African and had moved to the UK with his wife four years ago. He had a real passion for soldiering and nothing would faze him. He was looking forward to the Battalion moving to Northern Ireland as that would allow him more time for training, sport and family after two years of public duties. I had also just recommended him for a junior commander’s cadre as it was clear that he was ready for promotion after his exceptional performance on operations."

Capt Rupert Bowers, 24

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Wolverhampton, West Midlands

Died: 21 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an IED while leading a patrol to clear a position of the threat of insurgents

His family: "Rupert was a kind, caring and thoughtful man who was selfless in his actions as a brave courageous soldier."

Maj James Joshua Bowman, 34

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Salisbury, Wiltshire

Died: 13 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed alongside two other British soldiers by an Afghan soldier

His father John: "Our much-loved son, brother and friend, who cared more for his men than his own career was killed by a traitor during active servicein Afghanistan on July 13, 2010. Although he died doing something he loved, he was taken from us far too soon and leaves a huge hole in the lives of those he left behind. James was a true gentleman, a rare breed who was at his happiest participating in field sports in the English countryside.He lived life to the full and in his spare time loved to visit far-flung countries.James was an extremely thoughtful and caring individualwithin his family and very wide circle of friends.His well attended funeral, with full military honours, was at SalisburyCathedral with all the pomp and ceremony he loved. In 2011, members of the family and two friends formed 'Team Swift and Bold ' to compete successfully in the 'Race Across America' cycle race, which raised £84,000 that went in his memory to military charities he supported. Forever in our hearts."

Lt David Boyce, 25

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Queen's Dragoon Guards

From: Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire

Died: 17 November 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: One of two soldiers killed when their armoured vehicle hit an IED

His father Martin: "Following his graduation in 2009, David entered the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst. He received his Commission in August 2010 and joined the elite 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards. He immediately made his mark on the Regiment. The many citations from his troop and fellow officers show how much he was respected and admired as a leader. It's then-Commanding Officer said of him: 'Lt David Boyce was a charming young officer who, quite simply, represented everything that is great about the Regiment and British Army. He led from the front, setting the very highest standards, and inspired his men and peers alike. The Regiment has been denied one of our best, and a professional commander for the future has been taken from us'.

"Even as a young boy, David was warm and gregarious and it was clear that he was a born leader. Whatever he did, he would dedicate himself to it and encourage everyone else with him to do the same. That was his nature: confidence in his own abilites and steadfast in his determination to succeed. His loss leaves an enormous void in our lives. There will always be an empty seat at the table. Yet his love of life and laughter brings sunshine into our lives every day. We can't think about Dave and not smile; smile at one of the many anecdotes or stories that surrounded him throughout his life.

"A recent tribute from one of his fellow officers in the QDG still serving in Afghanistan describes this perfectly: 'Dave, the personification of never letting the truth get in the way of a good story.' All our lives are enriched through knowing Dave. He brought laughter to everything we did and enjoyment to the lives of all those he met. Never letting anything hinder a good time, Dave made so many friends by his generous nature and charming character. Always willing to go the extra yard for his friends he will never be forgotten, and will remain a part of us all forever.

"'Boycey' will always be remembered for his pure passion for life. Those who knew and loved him feel his tragic loss sorely, but we take pride and comfort in knowing that David died doing a job he truly loved, surrounded by men who loved and who respected him."

Pte John Brackpool, 27

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Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Crawley, Sussex

Died: 09 July 2009

Location: Helmand, near Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed during engagement with insurgent forces

His mother Carol: "Every Sunday evening we had a takeaway, as there was always one of us working during the day. We always had a friendly debate about what we would have, as I liked Chinese but John’s favourite was pizza. Even though most of the time it was my treat, he always charmed me into having pizza. He could always twist me round his little finger with a smile and a hug, so 99 per cent of the time we ended up having his favourite. John was just a normal lad who loved the Army, his family and his friends. He always wanted to be a soldier, right from when he was very small. He was known as the joker of the group; he loved to make his friends laugh and cheer them up if they were down."

L/Cpl Richard Brandon, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (45)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Kidderminster, Worcestershire

Died: 02 September 2009

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Killed when the vehicle he was driving was hit by an IED

Rob Lord, a close friend from The Light Dragoons: "Richie was my driver of the Samson recovery vehicle and, to be honest, he wasn’t the best driver in the world, bless him. When I said ‘turn left’ he would turn right and when I said ‘stop’ he tried throwing me out the turret with his club foot. He would rev the nuts off the engine so much that he could hardly ever hear me.

“He had his own unique scruffy look – stained T-shirts and combat trousers with a fag hanging out of his mouth. When I went on R&R, he gave me a list of things to do for him: I had to send him 1000 fags, forward his mail out to him, go into his comfy box [at barracks] and send his collection of books out. Definitely not forgetting his flip-flops! I found a new pair of combats in there so sent them as well and, I’m telling you now, they are still nice and clean in the bottom of his Bergen.

''But he was a quality vehicle mechanic who would just work and work until the job was done. Every picture I have looked through he is constantly smiling. He never ever moaned; he said to me, 'Lordy, if I could, I would stay out here until December 23 and then be back for Christmas with my family'. He was even going to volunteer to come out here next year and do a winter tour! What a loon.

“He was a devoted family man, and everything he did was to make a better life for his family. Every penny he earned was spent on his new home and he was excited by every bit of work he did on it."

L/Cpl Andrew Breeze, 31

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Manchester

Died: 12 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by a roadside explosion while clearing an area near a checkpoint

His sister Gaynor Breeze: "Andrew was a strong man and a very brave soldier, but he also had a softer side. I will never forget a day at Selly Oak hospital in 2008 with my son, David. He also served in Afghanistan and was badly injured in what they call a 'friendly fire' incident. When I got to the hospital, David had just arrived from the war zone - he was still wearing his combats and was covered in that dust you get over there. They laid him down in a bed and I waited for permission to see him. Andrew was with me and was a brilliant support but, when we were finally allowed in to see David he suddenly disappeared. A few minutes later he reappeared with a nail brush. Over the next few minutes Andrew very delicately cleaned David's nails. It was the gentleness of it that has stayed with me - this intimate moment between two tough soldiers. I can't think of anybody else in the world that I would have wanted to be with me that day. Andrew was a proud soldier and a wonderful family man and we miss him more every day."

Sgt Craig Brelsford, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (47)

Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment Worcesters and Foresters

Medals / Military Awards: Military Cross

From: Nottingham

Died: 08 September 2007

Location: Helmand, Garmsir

Incident: Shot during a firefight after falling behind enemy lines and trying to rescue wounded colleagues

Mjr Jamie Nowell, Officer Commanding A (Grenadier) Company: "I am convinced that if Sgt Brelsford had been given the opportunity to choreograph his own death it would not have been dissimilar to the heroic circumstances in which he died. Sgt Brelsford was killed in action attacking a well-defended Taliban position in an attempt to protect and evacuate his wounded comrades. He repeatedly fought through tenacious enemy fire to extract casualties and was hit on his final attack to find Pte Botha, also killed in action, who had fallen behind enemy lines - this exceptionally courageous act of bravery and selfless commitment personified the character of Sgt Brelsford."

SAC Christopher Bridge, 20

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Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF Regiment

From: Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Died: 30 August 2007

Location: Kandahar Airfield

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was caught in an explosion

His mother Nicolette Williams: "Christopher came into this world a big bouncing healthy 9lbs13oz in adverse weather conditions – minus 13 degrees. He was a perfect baby, an inquisitive child and, as an adult, he was a credit to me and a special friend to many. He was extremely polite, loving, caring, understanding, patient, and witty. He was also incredibly intelligent and had a true sense of adventure. He had a beautiful smile, not always on camera, but the one thing he wasn’t was indestructible. On the outside I smile, but this is far from how I - and many others - feel. Inside there is a gaping hole that will never be filled and will never heal. When your precious child has been killed, it’s impossible to heal. Christopher was, and still is, a remarkable young man. He was proud to serve in the RAF Regiment, and I’m extremely proud that he is my son. To Christopher I say: 'I love you son, very much. Till we meet again, God bless.'"

RM Adam Brown, 25

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Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Frimley, Surrey

Died: 01 August 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in an explosion while on foot patrol

His uncle Mike Crankshaw: "Not a day goes by without you being in my thoughts. I was so proud to be asked to be your godparent. When you passed for duty as a Royal Marine, I was bursting with pride. I knew just how hard you had to work to earn your coveted green beret. When you deployed to Afghanistan for the first time I was so concerned. Thankfully, you returned to your beloved mum, dad and fiancée Amy. Your wedding to Amy was a day that none of us would ever forget. Again the sense of pride watching you both take your vows was overwhelming. Quite literally ‘the perfect couple’.

"You went back not long after your wedding. That tour claimed the lives of 13 of your 40 Commando brothers and injured many more. When you came home for a few days of R&R, you spent time visiting your wounded colleagues rather than going out with your mates. That is the sort of man you were. The beer we shared together before you flew back out to complete the tour was to be our last. I said for you to keep your head down and stay safe, and at least I got to tell you that I loved you and was so proud of you. The news of your death rocked me to the core. At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, you will always be remembered."

Rfn James Brown, 18

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Farnborough, Kent

Died: 15 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed with another British soldier and two Afghan soldiers in a suspected suicide bomb attack while manning a checkpoint in a market place

His father Stephen: "Not even a day goes by without Jim coming to my mind but it does make it easier knowing he was doing what he wanted to do. For that year-and-a-half in the Army, I could see what it meant to him. It was such a joy to behold.

"If he could speak to me now he would say, ‘Dad, I can't believe I didn't get the chance to do one full tour’. [He had been in Afghanistan for less than two weeks on his first tour]. That would devastate him. He would feel he'd let people down. But you can't give any more than your life.

"Their bravery stands out a mile. I have spoken to David Kirkness’s mum [L/Cpl David Kirkness died alongside James] and she said there are so many similarities between them. James would have been so proud to have been with him.

“James was indestructible when he was a boy. I remember when he was one-and-a-half and he fell out of a window. It was a 12ft drop. I was out at the time and when I got the call my legs went to jelly. The air ambulance came and took him to hospital. But he came back about two hours later and they said there was nothing wrong with him. There's still a crack in the paving slab where he fell.

“We went out to play snooker the night before James left. The dad of his best mate asked him ‘what happens if the worst comes to the worst and you lose arms or legs?’ James said, ‘I will just get myself a new pair’ - that was his mindset.

“I remember the last time I saw him. I dropped him at the station and as he got out I said, 'Look after yourself' and shook his hand. I wished I'd given him a cuddle. His funeral was amazing. What the British Legion did was unbelievable. Shops closed for an hour. I had no idea what it was going to be like.

“We walked behind the coffin... you just don't expect what we saw that day."

L/Cpl Tommy Brown, 25

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Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Glasgow

Died: 22 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on foot patrol

His Regiment: "His cheeky grin and easy wit were never far from the surface, especially when things were tough. He died as he lived, leading from the front; the only place that someone like L/Cpl Brown knew."

Cpl Lee Brownson, 30

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

Medals / Military Awards: Conspicuous Gallantry Cross

From: Bishop Auckland, County Durham

Died: 15 January 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His colleague L/Cpl Johnny Cassell: "I first met Lee in 2004, when I joined Sniper Platoon 2LI [2nd Battalion The Light Infantry]. We instantly became solid friends as we shared similar interests and lived near each other in Co Durham. He was known as a bit of a ‘Del Boy’ in the battalion and never failed to make me laugh with stories of his latest money-making schemes. We used to spend many a night at the car auctions where we would dream about being able to afford a posh ‘Beemer’ or Merc. He was an awesome soldier, relaxed but professional at the same time, he never flapped and always knew exactly what he was doing. He attacked jobs that needed doing with the strength of 10 men and in so doing inspired both those under and above his command to do the same. As well as being an awesome soldier, Lee was also a fiercely devoted family man, and my thoughts are with his wife Leeanne, his two girls Ginalee and Morgan, and his unborn child due this summer. All in all, no words I’ve written here can ever sum up what an incredible man Lee Brownson was. I feel privileged to have known him for the time that I did. I’m totally gutted that he’s gone, and I think that everyone will agree with me that men like Lee don’t come round too often. He’s irreplaceable. I miss you mate, and I’ll never forget you."

Cpl Sarah Bryant, 26

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Service: Army

Regiment: Intelligence Corps

From: Carlisle, Cumbria

Died: 17 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when her vehicle was caught in an explosion

Her widower Carl: "No matter what the circumstances, Sarah always managed to keep a smile on her face. She was always positive and never happier than when back in Cumbria, out on her horse or walking on the fells with our dog. She had such a wonderful spirit, and could always make the best of a situation, no matter how grim, and it helped make her the soldier she was. She never let her head drop, never moaned or complained, she just got on with it.

"Sarah loved the Army and truly believed in what she was doing in Helmand, and I know that the men she served and died with truly believed in her. There was no one like Sarah; to me, her parents, grandparents, her friends and her comrades she was unique."

L/Cpl James (Jay) Brynin, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: Intelligence Corps

From: Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex

Died: 15 October 2013

Location: Helmand, Kakaran

Incident: Shot when his patrol was attacked

His friend Cpl Dan Williams: "When I first met Jay, I felt comfortable and reassured. We were the same age and in the same circumstances. We were both away from home having joined the Army together, would be joining the same Corps and we both missed our girlfriends and families. This common ground forged an instant friendship and during low points he became my confidant. Jay was, from day one, the most selfless bloke I have met, I instantly knew he was a rare breed and one I would follow anywhere without question. Throughout our training we became inseparable. I admired his zest for life and positive attitude, it kept me going. Every soldier has that moment of clarity, it is usually on exercise and raining '10 men' when we consider how life could have been if we hadn’t joined up. I remember it was in one of these moments that Jay’s grin caught my eye and I realised that I was exactly where I belonged – in the field, wet and freezing, but with the best blokes in the world. Jay possessed what I believe to be the defining quality of a soldier: compassion. He even maintained the banter when we were deployed on operations. Jay was a family man, best friend, a professional and capable soldier, but he was my first brother. Jay will forever be a constant inspiration for me to do better. For many of us who were lucky enough to know him, his laughter and humour will remain eternally – cheers mate."

Cpl Bryan Budd, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (55)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

Medals / Military Awards: Posthumous Victoria Cross

From: Ripon, North Yorkshire

Died: 20 August 2006

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Single-handedly stormed Taliban position, saving seven colleagues

His widow Lorena: “Bryan, of course, will always be remembered by me as a loving husband and father to our two beautiful daughters, Isabelle and Imogen. This exceptional act of valour, and the subsequent award of the Victoria Cross, is representative of the sort of man Bryan was; he was a proud and passionate Parachute Regiment soldier and he was someone who was prepared to make the very highest sacrifice, doing the job he loved, with his comrades and friends in the regiment he loved.”

L/Sgt Mark Burgan, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (56)

Service: Army

Regiment: Irish Guards

From: Liverpool, Merseyside

Died: 23 March 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed when his vehicle hit an IED

His widow Leanne: "No amount of words are ever going to be enough to describe my gorgeous husband. From the first minute I met Mark I knew I wouldn’t be letting him go – we clicked straight away. Even then, Mark’s passion for Army life shone through with everything he said and did. I would love introducing him to people... everyone would praise him wherever we went."

Fus Jonathan Burgess, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (57)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Welsh

From: Swansea

Died: 07 April 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Died in exchange of gunfire with insurgents

His father Royston: "He used to make us laugh, a happy-go-lucky lad. He could make a joke about anything. He could make people laugh just looking at him. He was a mother's boy but a man's man. He wasn’t aggressive but he loved his mother and you couldn’t do anything to his mother! When they had a disagreement, it wouldn’t take a minute and they’d be hugging each other. That’s why his mother has taken it so hard.”

His mother Susan: “Being a chef wasn’t for him. He asked me to sign his papers for the Army when he was 15. I said, ‘No, you are too young.’ But he signed them himself when he turned 16. I couldn’t stop him."

Fsr Shaun Bush, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (58)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

From: Coventry, Warwickshire

Died: 25 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Died in hospital in the UK Britain after being wounded in an explosion while trying to save a comrade struck by a separate roadside bomb

His friend Fsr James Turnbull, 2 Platoon, A Company Group, 2 RRF: "We became very close friends as we were from the same area and supported the same football team. I would take him home most weekends and pick him up again. We would chat about our girlfriends and how we would leave the Army and join the fire service.

“Once we deployed to Afghanistan we managed to share a room, where every day he complained of how hard it seemed. I always used to say it would be all right and he hated to hear it. We used to go for a sunset can on the helicopter landing site, where we would sit and watch the sun go down and say, ‘There’s another day gone’.

“I think one of the best memories of Bushy was when we set up a paddling pool in his bed space. He came off stag [guard duty] and didn’t know what was going on. He didn’t talk to us for two days afterwards, although he then got me back by mine-taping my bed space and writing abuse on the floor with cyalumes [glow sticks].”

Sgt Robert Busuttil, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (59)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Swansea

Died: 17 August 2002

Location: Kabul

Incident: Shot dead at a barbecue by Cpl John Gregory, who then committed suicide

His family: "As a family we are all devastated by Bob's death."

L/Cpl Barry Buxton, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (60)

Service: Army

Regiment: 21 Engineer Regiment Group

From: Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire

Died: 03 May 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Died after a road collapsed causing his vehicle to roll into a canal

His widow Emma: "Barry was my hero; my knight in shining armour. I was his Princess and he gave me the fairytale I dreamed of when I was a little girl. I am devastated that it has been brought to such an abrupt end but I am left with millions of happy memories of the time we spent together. I feel empty at my loss but filled with love and comforted by people who also loved Barry. My soldier, my hero, I will remain eternally proud of who you were."

C. Sgt. Alan Cameron, 42

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (61)

Service: Army

Regiment: Scots Guards

From: Livingston, West Lothian

Died: 31 March 2011

Location: Helmand, north of Lashkar Gah

Incident: Died at home in Livingston having been hit by an IED while on foot patrol

His friend WO1 AI Mackenzie: "Cammy was a father figure, a calming influence, an honest friend to us all and a fine example of a true Scots Guardsman. From the Corporals’ Mess of the 2nd Battalion to the dizzy heights of the Sergeants’ Mess in the 1st Battalion, his cheery nature would make the worst of days that little more bearable.

"A passionate rugby enthusiast, be it only from the sideline with a pint or two, he could always be relied on for the banter."

L/Cpl Michael Campbell, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (62)

Service: Army

Regiment: 3rd Battalion The Royal Welsh

From:

Died: 23 July 2015

Location: Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham

Incident: Shot in April 2012

Major Dafydd Evans, Campbell’s commanding officer, said: "A larger than life character, Cammy always brought a smile to your face with his wit and cutting sarcasm and he was always on hand to pass on his experience to the new, and not so new, members of the company. When I learnt that he had volunteered, yet again, to deploy on what would be his fourth tour, I told him that he had done enough already, his reply was "Well someone has to go and look after you, Boss". That is what Cammy was truly about. He was a team player, who was committed to serving his country."

Sjt Steven Campbell, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (63)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Pelton, County Durham

Died: 22 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

Lt Col Nick Kitson, Commanding Officer, 3 RIFLES Battle Group: "Serjeant Steve Campbell was one of the Army’s rarest treasures. So positive and energetic, it was truly an honour and a pleasure to know him."

Fsr Louis Carter, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (64)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

From: Nuneaton, Warwickshire

Died: 16 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Died in an explosion while on patrol

In August 2010, Nuneaton and Bedworth Borough Council named a children’s play area in Riversley Park 'Louis’ Place' in memory of Fusilier Carter. His mother Denise walks her dog through the park every morning: “Riversley Park was like his second garden, he learned how to skateboard and ride a bike there. He went to swim at the baths and went to playgroup there before he went to school. I remember he went to karate classes there. He’d march round it pretending to be a soldier. He loved that park. I know Louis would have been over the moon to hear that a part of the park had been named after him.

"Some of Louis’ childhood friends have given their children the middle name Louis or Carter after him, which is truly wonderful. I hope they take the kids own the park and that they will get as much pleasure out of Louis' Place as he did when he was little."

L/Bdr Mark Chandler, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (65)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery

From: Nailsworth, Gloucestershire

Died: 08 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali area

Incident: Shot in exchange of fire with insurgents

His father Mike: "Before he joined the Army, Mark had a bit of a thing for fast cars and had a succession of Lancia Delta HF Turbos – hot Italian hatchbacks. I will never forget the day, one long weekend, when I got a phone call out of the blue, saying ‘Dad, can you come and fetch me?’ The radiator had burst in his car. ‘Where are you?’ I asked. ‘Newquay,’ he said. I was shocked; I thought he was going to be somewhere local. But, of course, I went. I got to him at about 9pm. We slept in the car and fixed it the next day. I remember being a bit put out at the time. Now I wish I could do it for him every weekend. He was a terrific kid. A great liver of life and a total adrenaline junkie. Anything that was going, he grabbed it with two hands."

WO1 Darren Chant, 40

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (66)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Walthamstow, London

Died: 03 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Shin Kalay

Incident: Shot by an Afghan policeman in an unprovoked attack, along with five other British soldiers

His widow Nausheen: "I am devastated by the loss of my husband. Our unborn son will never meet his father, but he will know him through his legacy. For whether in uniform or out, his incomparable courage and selflessness humbled all those who knew and loved him.

"His famed sense of humour lightened any situation. I will miss my best friend and nothing will fill the void he has left, my darling Darren. A natural born leader who led from the front. I am immensely proud to say he was my husband."

Flt Lt Rakesh Chauhan, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (67)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF Intelligence Branch

From: Birmingham, West Midlands

Died: 26 April 2014

Location: Kandahar, Takhta Pul district

Incident: Died in a helicopter crash

His father Kishor: "He was a good adviser. He had advice about everything. He was a great help around the house. In everything I did I took his advice, and it was very useful to have that advice."

"I miss him sitting in between his mother and I showing us the photos of his latest adventures of backpacking, sking, rock climbing or tracking holidays. I miss pulling in the driveway on Friday and seeing his car, it would lift my sprits up because I knew that we were in for a fun and eventful weekend. Most importantly I miss his wit, his sharp intellect and his smile."

"Our smile and laughter will always be empty without him. Nothing can fill the large vacuum in our lives. Our lives are unfulfilled without him."

Lt Andrew Chesterman, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (68)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Guildford, Surrey

Died: 09 August 2012

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Shot dead during an ambush by insurgents after one of the vehicles in his convoy hit a roadside bomb

His father Paul Chesterman: "Andrew gave himself fully and wholeheartedly to his career in 3 Rifles. His family are immensely proud of him and will carry him very dearly in their hearts."

Lt Daniel Clack, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (69)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: London

Died: 12 August 2011

Location: Helmand, Shaparak area of Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His mother Sue: "One evening before he was due to go to Afghanistan, he sat writing obituaries for his men. Officers had to, so that if anything happened to any of their men, they didn't have to worry about gathering information. He said to me, 'Mum, someone somewhere is sitting writing mine.' But I never, ever put him off because the Army was something he loved, and I would have hated him, when he was dying, lying there thinking, 'Mum was right'.

"It's changed what we do with our time, our careers, our partners. I don't bother planning for the future. I think a lot about when he did history GCSE: they went to the battlefields in France, where one headstone was engraved ‘Duty Called – He Answered’. And Dan said, ‘If the situation ever arises, that’s what I’d like on my headstone’. I kept a note of it. It made my life easier – I didn’t have to worry about what went on his headstone because we knew."

L/Bdr Ross Clark, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (70)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: , South Africa

Died: 03 March 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by RPG during a Nato-led ISAF operation

His CO Lt Col Neil Wilson: "Ross was a determined, intelligent and motivated young man who epitomised the standards of professionalism against which we measure ourselves. He was extremely popular within the Regiment and had already begun a rapid progression through the ranks."

Capt Thomas Clarke, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (71)

Service: Army

Regiment: Air Corps

From: Cowbridge, South Wales

Died: 26 April 2014

Location: Kandahar, Takhta Pul district

Incident: Died in a helicopter crash

His Commanding Officer: "Capt Thomas Clarke was a fantastic young officer, full of life and immensely committed to his soldiers and friends."

L/Cpl Alan Cochran, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (72)

Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment

From: St Asaph, Denbighshire

Died: 04 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed in exchange of fire with insurgents

His mother Shirley Jane: "Alan was a tremendous son. He was proud to be a soldier and died doing a job he loved. We are devastated by the loss of Alan, who was a loving son, grandson and brother. We are proud of the fact that Alan was prepared to do his duty helping the people of Afghanistan."

Maj Matthew Collins, 38

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (73)

Service: Army

Regiment: Irish Guards

From: Blackwell, Somerset

Died: 23 March 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed when his vehicle hit an IED

His friend and colleague, Major Mickey Stewart: "My friend of 16 years, Matt Collins was an extraordinary man with a passion for life, his Regiment and his family that few could surpass. Whether skydiving or field sports, ski touring or knowing every single verse to the ‘Irish Rover’ by heart, Matt had an indomitable spirit. By definition, this strength of character made Matt the perfect infantryman. He was an exceptional soldier."

L/Cpl Daniel Cooper, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (74)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Hereford, Herefordshire

Died: 24 January 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died following an IED blast during a resupply patrol

His parents Karl and Caroline: "A caring son, brother and partner. He was a best friend who will be sadly missed by all that knew him. Daniel, we were proud to be your parents from the day you were born.”

Lt Col Nick Kitson, Commanding Officer, 3 RIFLES Battle Group: “L/Cpl Daniel Cooper was one of the great characters of the battalion; his sense of humour and zest for life were topped only by his ability and determination. The consummate soldier, he was the complete package; fit, bright and dedicated to his work. Ever cheerful and irrepressibly positive, he shone as an example to the more junior Riflemen on how to act and what to aim for.

''L/Cpl Cooper was cruelly taken from us while doing the job he loved. He had survived numerous brushes with danger in this tough fight alongside colleagues and mates who respected, trusted and loved him. The loss of a Rifleman brimming with such talent and potential leaves a real gap in the Battle Group for the here and now and in this, his battalion for the longer term."

Sgt Nigel Coupe, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (75)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Lytham St Anne's, Lancashire

Died: 06 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah Durai

Incident: Killed when Warrior armoured vehicle was hit by an IED

His widow Natalie: "He had been to Iraq twice before but I was more scared about Afghanistan. He flew out in an advance party on Valentine's Day. Saying goodbye was always the worst – I hated that part. It's because you spend weeks and months leading up to it and then when it gets nearer you just want it to happen.

"That morning he was waiting for his dad to pick him up and drive him to the train station. Nigel was ready 30 minutes early – he was always ready early – and was just sitting there in the house, surrounded by all his kit and our children, Ella, then four, and Jasmine, then two. In the end, he got too impatient and said, 'Right I'm going’, and picked up all his stuff and left the house.

"I completely understood why he did that. With hindsight, we would obviously have made a bigger deal of saying goodbye, but everything would be different with hindsight. We never expected that he wouldn't come back."

Pte Peter Cowton, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (76)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Basingstoke, Hampshire

Died: 29 July 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died after an explosion during an encounter with Taliban fighters

Sgt Simon Connor, 9 Platoon Sgt: ‘"Pte Cowton was a reserved but confident soldier whose positive outlook and sense of humour made him a popular member of the Platoon. He was always coming to me asking if anything needed doing or telling me that he had to complete this or that job but would do more if necessary.

“He was remarkably professional in his work and mature beyond his years. Always up for a chat, he would be ready to crack a story over a brew, and the sight of his bright red face poking through a treeline always made me smile. He was absolutely at ease with his fellow Paratroopers, whether soldier or officer; he had time to spare and to invest in the wellbeing of others - he took an interest and his humanity was one of his most endearing qualities. His passing left a hole in the Platoon and he will be remembered with great fondness by all who knew him."

L/Cpl Peter Craddock, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (77)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment

From: Newbury, Berkshire

Died: 27 March 2006

Location: Helmand. Lashkar Gah

Incident: Vehicle hit a tractor on L/Cpl Craddock's last patrol of tour of duty

His brother Will: ''For Pete's sake stop the wars.''

Cpl Mark Cridge, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (78)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Corps of Signals

From: Barford St Martin, Wiltshire

Died: 22 March 2006

Location: Helmand, Camp Bastion

Incident: According to a 2007 Coroner's report, Corporal Cridge killed himself

His CO Lt Col Alan Blackwell: ‘‘Cpl Mark Cridge was an instantly likeable young man. Well respected by all ranks, he was a good all-round soldier who clearly enjoyed his trade. Mark was a natural athlete and was always among the first to volunteer to play sport for his troop or squadron; he often turned in a good score on the cricket pitch.’’

RM Jonathan Crookes, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (79)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Halesowen, West Midlands

Died: 16 July 2010

Location: Sangin area

Incident: Killed in an explosion while on foot patrol

His mother Sue: "Jon was a caring, thoughtful son, full of life. If he made up his mind to do something he always achieved it to a high standard. I am so proud of him."

Rgr Justin Cupples, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (80)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Irish Regiment

From: County Cavan, Ireland

Died: 04 September 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died when an IED was triggered while on routine patrol

His CO Lt Col Ed Freely: "Justin Cupples was a character. He stood out as such. He was from Cavan in the Republic of Ireland, but I always thought of him as our ‘US Ranger’. He had an eclectic international background having been born in the United States and grown up in Miami, Florida. He also had some prior service in the US Navy. His parents were based in New York, yet maintained a family home in Virginia, Co Cavan, Ireland. In 2006, Ranger Cupples married Vilma, his Lithuanian wife, after meeting her in Ireland.

"He was drawn to the Battalion by the Irish fighting spirit and camaraderie. He joined the Battalion and C Company in Tern Hill, Shropshire, in 2007. He was an intelligent, bright soldier. I recall engaging with him on a number of occasions - as I say he stood out - whether on arduous training in Kenya last year or on Pre Deployment Training for Afghanistan.

"He was never shy to offer an opinion. Rgr Cupples was part of C (Ranger) Company, an element of 1 R IRISH that was detached to support 2 PARA, as Battlegroup North, in Sangin for Op HERRICK 8. He was loyal, strong and determined; a very good soldier. I had last seen him in Sangin several weeks ago, where I recall his professional, relaxed and confident assessment of the situation. For almost six months he and his fellow Rangers have fought hard to rid Sangin of the Taliban and bring security to the town and its troubled people.

"Rgr Cupples was a true Irish Ranger - tough, committed and dedicated to his comrades. His colleagues, mindful of the ultimate sacrifice made by Justin, and with him to the last, continue with his and their mission - with steadfast courage and reinforced purpose. Rgr Cupples’ death is a great loss to all of us in 1 R IRISH and to his wife and family. We pray for his soul and for his wife and his family. May his soul rest in peace."

Cpl Stephen Curley, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (81)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Dewsbury, West Yorkshire

Died: 26 May 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on foot patrol

His mother Andrea: "The thing that people always tell me is this: 'I could never have done it without Stephen'. He was always encouraging friends to achieve their dreams. He was always instilling confidence in them. He was a go-getter, and he wanted others to be too.

"Stephen was very academic. There were never any complaints at parents evening. He had grades good enough to get him to Oxbridge. He applied himself completely to everything he did; as soon as he joined the Marines he really got into physical activity, taking up mountain climbing, biking and swimming. He was very good-looking and he knew it – there was no lack of confidence there! – and my lasting memory of him is his smile and his big brown eyes. They really did light up.

"I know I make him sound perfect but he was mischievous, too. He was very close to his brother but they were also very different. Sean was calm, Stephen excitable. I always remember them as little boys. Stephen would call his grandparents by their first names, and Sean would say, ‘You can’t say that, Stephen!’ That’s my clearest memory: Stephen being cheeky, Sean telling him to behave. Now I see that witty, clever part of Stephen in his son, William. It’s bittersweet to see those similarities."

RM Thomas Curry, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (82)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Wanstead, London

Died: 13 January 2007

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Died during a mission to clear Taliban positions

His mother Linda: "Aged 14, Tom once rushed to the aid of a stranger, a diminutive 12-year-old Indian boy who was being mugged by two young men, older and larger than Tom. Putting a protective arm around the boy's shoulders, he demanded that the muggers 'Leave my brother alone!' They laughed in his face, but Tom's body language made it clear that they weren't getting the lad's phone without a fight. They sloped off without another word. That was Tom all over, always ready to stand up and, if necessary, fight for what was right."

Tom had proposed to his girlfriend, Carla, on the phone on Christmas Day, and they planned to tell their families on his next leave. He never made it home.

Gnr Zak Cusack, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (83)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire

Died: 26 May 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by small arms fire while on joint patrol with the Afghan National Army

His family: "Zak was a courageous, compassionate and charismatic young man. We are justly proud of not only the job that he did, but of the complete person we all knew and loved. For such a young man, Zak’s infectious sense of humour, appetite for life and truly romantic heart inspired so many others. His loss leaves a hole in our hearts, a chasm in our lives and many, many other broken hearts behind. He had a fire in his soul that will burn brightly in all our memories. He is our beautiful boy, loving son and best friend; in Zak’s own words, ‘he is a ledge’ (legend)."

Major Nick Constable, Battery Commander 129 (Dragon) Battery, 4th Regiment Royal Artillery: "He was a young man with tremendous energy, a sharp wit and a zest for life. His stories of escapades on the town with his many friends were a constant source of amusement. A talented radio operator and a courageous individual who would put his team members and friends before himself. Only one week prior to his tragic death, exhausted, whilst returning from a patrol which received a casualty, he relieved a tiring stretcher party of their burden by putting his injured colleague over his shoulders and carrying him through boggy terrain to safety."

Pte Nathan Cuthbertson, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (84)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Sunderland, Tyne and Wear

Died: 08 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a suicide bomber while on foot patrol

His father Tom: "Nathan was a character – he was a bit of a joker and his athleticism made him popular with the girls. He always loved his sports: he played for the county in football. He could play defence, midfield and on the wing; they used to use him for different positions.

"When he went to Afghanistan, he bought season tickets for Sunderland for his two younger brothers, who were still in school and couldn’t afford to buy their own tickets. I told him to keep his money, but he said: 'No. I’m away, I won’t be spending the money – it’ll just be sitting in a bank. Far better for my brothers to see Sunderland.

"Even though he was a joker, Nathan was also quiet; he was a bit like an old man – he enjoyed just chilling out, he was mature for his age. He couldn’t wait to join the Army: he joined at just 16. I was in the Parachute Regiment, too. My second son, Connan, always wanted to join the Army, too, and he did – three years after Nathan died. We had mixed feelings; I was proud that Connan wanted to join the Army, and that he was keen and intelligent, and wanted to do well, and that his brother’s death hadn’t put him off. He’s the very image of Nathan – he played for Sunderland county, too. I think Nathan would have encouraged him to join the Army. Anyway, Connan’s out now. I’m proud of both of them, of their service. I was sure nothing would happen to Nathan. I told my wife he’d be OK in Afghanistan. It blew me off my feet when he was killed."

Pte Andrew Cutts, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (85)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Mansfield, Nottinghamshire

Died: 06 August 2006

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: A coroner recorded a narrative verdict on Pte Cutt's death in January 2008, concluding that it was probably the result of "friendly fire"

His CO Lt Col Neale Jouques OBE RLC: "He died doing what he was good at, protecting his comrades. He was a brave and exemplary soldier."

Rgr David Dalzell, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (86)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Irish Regiment

From: Bangor, County Down

Died: 04 February 2011

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Accidentally shot by a colleague who was cleaning a rifle

His parents Gordon and Susan: "To try and capture David’s personality, character and what he meant to us is so very difficult and personal. David came into this world on May 31, 1990, and grew up surrounded by love with his older brothers Gareth and Mark. When he left school he went onto further education and began training as a motor mechanic and although he enjoyed this, his heart was not in it. He followed his older brother Gary into the military.

"We were very proud when David left home for the Royal Irish Regiment Training Centre, Cattrick, in January 2010. In phone calls home, he talked a lot about the training, but more about the great friendships he had forged. A week before his passing out he had phoned us and laughed that he was glad he hadn’t joined the Royal Scots as it was easier to iron a pair of trousers than a kilt.

"David passed out on July 24, 2010, and it was with immense pride, joy and tears that we, his brother Mark and David’s best friend watched him, march off the square. We learned that David would deploy with his Regiment to Afghanistan in September. We were worried, of course, about his deployment: we had an older son, Gareth, who had completed two tours of Iraq and was currently in Afghanistan, and, not understanding the logistics, we made Gareth promise to 'pop over and check on David'. David's phone calls home brightened up our days. We were told after that David would always leave the welfare phone back drained of battery.

"David came home on leave November 2010, and we saw a change in him. We had sent the military our youngest precious son and he had returned a well-grounded young man. We had planned an early Christmas for David; it was our last Christmas with our son.

"It has been three years nine months since our world crashed. On February 4, 2011, at 06:59 David was fatally shot. So began the roller-coaster of emotion. On February 10, he was repatriated to Wootten Bassett. With the help of Lady Silvia Hermon MP, we were allowed to see our son at Bristol Hospital on February 11 and for that we are eternally grateful. He looked beautiful, perfect.

"David returned home to us on February 15, his funeral was on February 18, 2011; it was a military funeral carried out with professionalism and dignity, his brother Gareth was part of the Military Bearer Party. On April 11, we met with S.I.B., we had a full, frank and sometimes brutal briefing but we learned how David died. On April 23 we met with the Rev Andrew Totten (Padre 1 Royal Irish Reg) at our home. The Rev Totten had been there and this was, to us, the most informative, gentle meeting to date, as it was explained to us in detail how David’s death had effected his Platoon, how the soldier who accidently shot David reacted. We watched a DVD that David’s Platoon had compiled and this put a human touch to this tragic accident. We began to understand and for that we cannot thank the Rev Totten enough. We took great comfort that David died surrounded by friends.

''Twelve weeks after David died, we met with the soldier who shot him. This was probably one of the hardest decisions that we, as parents, had to make, he was able to give us an insight into David’s life in Afghanistan, how close they were, their long talks about family, friends and life back home. On May 31, 2011, he would have celebrated his 21st birthday. David was a loving son and touched the hearts of all who knew him in his short life, he had a beautiful smile, and infectious laugh, a cheeky grin he was outgoing, happy and extremely loyal. This has, and continues to be, a time of utter despair and disbelief at the situation we, our family and friends, find ourselves in. All our hopes and dreams for David have gone, and while we are very proud of what he achieved in his 20 years, we think about what he might have achieved in the future.

"Now there is a pre-David and post-David’s death. He was firstly our beloved son, he was a brother, nephew, uncle, boyfriend and best friend to all who had the privilege to know and love him. Secondly, he was a soldier and we are very proud that he served in such a distinguished Regiment.

"Our lasting memories of David is of him growing up as a child, our baby boy, as a toddler playing mini rugby where he got his nick name 'Diesel'; because he ran around so much, the coach asked had he been 'drinking diesel' and the name stuck. We have a burning dream that he will come home, that he is away on a secret military mission and some day he will walk into his family home again, come home. This is our dream.

"But that dream was shattered when the military told us in August 2012, that at post mortem they kept some of David’s body parts. This was handled diabolically by the military. They did not tell us they had kept parts of David and when it came to bringing the rest of my son home they trailed their feet. It was five months later in December 2012 we were able to have all of David back. When I asked why it had taken from August to December to sort this, we were told, to our utter despair and horror, that it was due to military financial restraints. We have a typed letter of apology.

"Our anger and argument was 'you had the cash to send my son 3,000 miles to fight a war on terrorism but not enough cash to bring him all back home to his family in Northern Ireland, taking body parts without consent or telling my wife and I it had been done, and not sending him back to his family for the sake of a few hundred pounds sterling'. In a heartbeat, I would give all I have, including my own life, to have my baby boy home safely.

"No one who has not lost a child can understand the monumental sense of loss and grief. Words have not been written yet, you could scan the Oxford Dictionary and never find the words to describe our feelings at the loss of David. It has changed us in every aspect of our lives there is nothing anyone can say to ease this daily pain."

Lt Douglas Dalzell, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (87)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Coldstream Guards

Medals / Military Awards: Military Cross

From: Hamstead Marshall, near Newbury, Berkshire

Died: 18 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Killed during an operation to clear insurgents

His father and mother Anthony and Colette: "It feels like yesterday since we last saw Dougie. More than four years have passed since his death and he is always in our thoughts. His kindness, inner strength, integrity and determination have propelled us, his family, to keep going and make the most of life. We know that's what he would have wanted. New events take place, happy events take place, they are always tinged with sadness as he is not here but we know he wants 'no weeping, only tears of joy' and for us 'to live each day as if it was [our] last'. We thank all his many, many friends for their constant love and support."

Sgt Steven William Darbyshire, 35

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (88)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Wigan, Greater Manchester

Died: 23 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin district

Incident: Shot dead on patrol

His family: "Being a Royal Marine was Steven’s life and growing up it was all he wanted to do. He was proud to wear the uniform and served his country as the consummate professional. He was strong, vibrant, generous, passionate, full of life and he certainly lived life to the full. He died doing the job he so loved. Our world will be a bleaker place without him, his infectious laughter and fantastic sense of humour. Mere words do not begin to convey the deep grief and painful heartbreak his untimely death has brought. Steven may have been a ‘hoofin’ bootneck’ to his colleagues, but to his beautiful boys, Ryan and Callum, he was the very best daddy in the world. He will live on through his sons, and those who loved him so much will never forget him and the sacrifice he made."

His Commanding Officer, 40 Commando Group, Combined Force Sangin, Lt Col Paul James: "Sgt Steven Darbyshire was a proper Lancashire lad: charismatic, loyal, determined and dedicated with an irrepressible and infectious sense of humour. The last time I saw him he was covered in thick mud having just fallen into an irrigation ditch, but he gave me a beaming smile and, in the manner that only he could deliver, illuminatingly described his misfortune to all. He never took life too seriously, but he cared passionately for the lives of others. He inspired and encouraged, he got the very best from his men, his band of brothers, and they loved him for it. He was a proud father, a magnificent leader and definitely a ‘Saint’."


L/Cpl George Davey, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (89)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Beccles, Suffolk

Died: 20 May 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Shot himself in what MoD described as 'a tragic firearms accident'

His widow Joanna: "George and I met when I was just 16, so he was my first love. At first I didn’t want him to be in the Army because I really missed him and I wanted to be together all the time, but it’s what he always wanted to do. Once we were married, I was happy for him to rejoin.

"He chose the name of our first daughter, Millie, and was a very hands-on father. He would get up in the middle of the night and wanted to be involved in everything. Millie was two-and-a-half when he left for Afghanistan and our second daughter, Morgan, was 14 months.

"George had such a hard upbringing. He was fostered and I know he wanted a family of his own and to do it properly. He was so proud of us and loved spending time together. That’s when he was happiest.

"George sent me letters, poems and drawings every day in Afghanistan, and he asked me to pray for him to keep him safe.

"He was sent on operation and he sent me one long poem before he went. He wrote it as if that was the last time he’d speak to me, so that I’d know everything he wanted to say. In the end, it was the last poem he ever sent."

Sgt Lee Davidson, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (90)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Light Dragoons

From: Doncaster, South Yorkshire

Died: 09 September 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died after his armoured vehicle hit a roadside bomb

Lt Col Sam Plant, Commanding Officer, The Light Dragoons: "He was the most natural leader of men and soldiers flourished under his command – he set the perfect tone and example and cared deeply for his soldiers’ welfare. Rarely to be seen without a broad smile on his face, his enormous popularity was borne out of deep respect and his unbreakable sense of fun."

Flt Sgt Adrian Davies, 49

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (91)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Amersham, Buckinghamshire

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His colleagues: "Ady was the epitome of the professional aviator and excelled in everything he did; a quiet person but always there with a smile, a handshake and a tip for a colleague."

Gdsmn Christopher Davies, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (92)

Service: Army

Regiment: Irish Guards

From: St Helens, Merseyside

Died: 17 November 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Shot in an ambush while on patrol

His family: "Christopher had always wanted to be in the Army ever since he was at school. He really enjoyed computer games and karaoke evenings with his cousins and friends. He loved singing and rock music so you always knew when he was in the shower, and he was a real joker with a vivid imagination.

"We are very proud of Christopher and all that he achieved. One of the last things that he told us was that he wanted to specialise within the Army – he was very focused on his job and enjoyed the work, his comrades and the lifestyle.

"Christopher was a cracking lad. His friends in the Army have told us that whenever they felt down, he would cheer them up, often by singing. We will always love Christopher. He had an invincible personality and we will miss him so much. There is a big hole in our lives."

(Video) The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan 2001-2014

RM Damian Davies, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (93)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Commando Logistics Regiment

From: Telford, Shropshire

Died: 12 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin, south of

Incident: Killed in an explosion caused by a 13-year-old suspected suicide bomber

His Squadron Commander, Mjr Marcus Taylor, Royal Marines: "A proud husband and father, Marine Davies will leave a void in many lives that will be impossible to fill."

L/Cpl Lee Davies, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (94)

Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Camarthen, Camarthenshire

Died: 12 May 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah district

Incident: Shot by members of the Afghan Police Force while providing security for a meeting with local officials

His family: "Lee was a brother, an uncle, a grandson, a nephew and a cousin. He had a family that both respected and admired the soldier he had become. Lee was immensely prou‎d of being a Welsh Guard. It was his life and he excelled in every way. He was respected and highly regarded by his colleagues on all levels. He was the kind of lad that could light up a room with ‎his infectious laugh and wicked sense of humour that kept everyone laughing along with him‎. He could always be relied on to turn up for two or three Christmas dinners with different family members eat everything in sight, drink whatever he could find, and end the day snoring on the settee. He is missed every day by the family ‎but his memory will always be in our hearts."


Gdsmn Simon Davison, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (95)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Newcastle

Died: 03 May 2007

Location: Helmand, Garmsir

Incident: Shot in attack by Taliban while manning a checkpoint

His sister Caroline: "Simon insisted on trying everything once. 'I’m here for a good time, not for a long time,' he’d always say, and he was constantly naughty and mischievous while growing up. He unscrewed pipes to flood the school toilet aged six and, when he was older, he crashed his car on the motorway not long after passing his test – all because he dropped a Malteser. He never ate Maltesers again after that.

"I think Simon had an idea that he might not be coming back. Before he was deployed we had a discussion about funerals, and he said he wanted to be cremated. He wanted Burn Baby Burn to play followed by 'I am the Antichrist' by the Sex Pistols. We’re Catholic, so we couldn’t play those in the church with Father Pat but we had both at the crematorium. Nobody wore black and the wake was a big party. We had glowsticks and whistles, everyone from the Army was up and dancing and it sounds strange, but it was one of the best parties. It’s what Simon would have wanted."

Kgn Sean Dawson, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (96)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Stalybridge, Greater Manchester

Died: 14 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Shot by Afghan soldiers in a "friendly fire" incident. Coroner's verdict: Accidental death

His Commanding Officer, Lt Col Robbie Boyd: "I have never been so impressed with a young fighter's courage in the boxing ring. His skill, determination and fighting spirit summed up everything The Duke of Lancaster values in English Infantry soldiers. I awarded him the trophy of a silver lion, henceforth to be known as 'The Dawson Trophy', as the most courageous fighter on the night."

Cpl Channing Day, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (97)

Service: Army

Regiment: 3 Medical Regiment

From: Comber, County Down

Died: 24 October 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by small arms fire while on patrol

Her mother Rosemary: "She always wanted to go into the Army. Her dad, Leslie, was in the Ulster Defence Regiment. When she was a toddler, she would take his beret out of his bag, put it on and march around the living room. As she got a bit older, he used to march round with her and show her how to do it.

"They had a Cadet stand at the school fair and from the age of eight she would ask each year: “Can I join?” They said she wasn’t old enough. But by the time she got to 12, I think they were fed up listening to her, so they said that she could join but she wouldn’t be able to go on exercises yet. We thought the Army was in Channing’s blood: it was all she ever talked about. She went to Cadets every single week – she would bat her eyelids at her Dad and he would iron her uniform. When she came back from exercises on Sundays, she wouldn’t have had much sleep all weekend so she would conk out in bed. She would dump her filthy kitbag for Mum to clean up.

"She was a real tomboy: she was the only girl in the school football team and one of the only girls in their ice hockey team. She played football and ice hockey for Northern Ireland. The more physical the sport, the more Channing loved it.

"When she was 16, she wanted to join the Engineers. She passed everything, but she was a couple of centimetres too short [she was 5ft 3in]. So she came home and we put a mark on the wall: we used to measure her each week. She went to the gym and she even used to lie down and one of us would pull her arms and the other her legs to try to stretch her. We had some laughs about it. But she didn’t grow one centimetre.

"She was absolutely devastated, so I suggested being a combat medic. She said: 'I don’t want to be in a hospital, I want to be on the front line.' We read through it and found that she could [do that]. She was so chuffed. Her passing out parade was very emotional because she was one of the tiniest girls there. I knew that was the career she wanted but I always had the worry of where she could go and what it would involve. But I was delighted when she said: 'Mum, I’ve made it, I’ve done it.' It meant everything to us, because it was her dream. I’m still very proud of her."

Kgn Darren Deady, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (98)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Bolton, Lancashire

Died: 10 September 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died in a UK hospital after being shot

His mother Julie Baxter: "Darren had an impeccable smile and a wicked sense of humour. When everyone was down, he would pick them up and make them smile, that’s the kind of lad he was. I have seven boys and Darren was the second oldest. He got on well with all of them and he was very loyal. If somebody ever threatened any of them, he would come to the rescue. Darren’s youngest brother was only 12 months old when he died.

"Darren had a passion for singing and motorbikes. He and all his brothers were quite musical. He was good at MCing and had been performing at a local pub since he was 15. There was just one place that would let him do it and I used to go with him. He MCed at his grandma’s 25th wedding anniversary and he was offered a job in a club in Magaluf when he was 16. He could really sing, and he would just rhyme it off. He loved his motorbike, absolutely loved it. He would never part with it - he had it in Cyprus, where he was stationed and the RAF bought it back for us, to remember him by."


Cpl Robert Deering, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (99)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Commando Logistics Regiment

From: Birmingham, Birmingham

Died: 21 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah, north-west of

Incident: Killed after triggering an IED

His Troop Colour Sgt, Simon Nicholson: "The first time I ever saw Cpl Rob Deering was a number of years ago at a petrol station in Barnstaple. I knew that he was a young Vehicle Mechanic who worked in the Light Aid Detachment and thought ‘how the hell can he afford that nice BMW?’ As I got to know Rob better, I learnt that he guarded his money extremely tightly. A typical example of this was that during the full six months of his first deployment to Afghanistan he only spent $50."

Cpl Barry Dempsey, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (100)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Aryshire, Aryshire

Died: 18 August 2008

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Died after insurgents detonated a roadside bomb

His widow Shelly: "Barry was a devoted husband and father. He has died doing a job he loved. His family and the Army was his life. He will be forever missed by his wife, children and family. He will never be forgotten. He died a hero."

L/Cpl David Dennis, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (101)

Service: Army

Regiment: Light Dragoons

From: Llanelli, Carmarthenshire

Died: 04 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His mother Adele: "David lived his life to the full and at about a hundred miles an hour. He loved military history and died doing a job he loved and believed in."

Cpl Oliver Dicketts, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (102)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Wadhurst, East Sussex

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His father Robert: "Oliver was our only child. He was a great outdoor person and sportsman and played rugby and hockey for his school. When he was 12, Oliver took up fencing and was among the top 12 for his age group in the UK, and when he was 17 he became the youngest BSAC Scuba Diving Instructor in the UK, qualifying before he was legally old enough to teach. He was also a highly proficient sky diver! I’m a retired chartered accountant, and the last thing he wanted to do was sit behind a blinkin' desk. Joining the Army was his choice and we fully supported him in it. In an argument, Oliver was like a terrier with a bone; he never gave way and was very independent minded. He had a wonderful close circle of friends who all miss him as much as we do, and who gave him the nickname Victor Meldrew. He always helped those who needed help. If people had problems with their payslips, Oliver was always prepared to go and talk to the authorities and sort it out. The last time I spoke to Oliver was on my birthday, two days before the crash. I was mowing the lawn when I decided to come in for a drink and at that moment he telephoned from overseas to wish me 'Happy Birthday'. We chatted for about 10 minutes. Unfortunately, his mother Priscilla was out at the time. We have so many happy memories and we are incredibly proud of him."

His friend Daniel: "I first met Oliver at prep school. We were in different year groups so I moved on and we lost touch. Some years later we were reintroduced by a mutual friend and we immediately hit it off again. By this time Olly was in the Parachute Regiment, so we would only see each other when he was home on leave. At that time we were a crowd of five. Whenever we could, we would go out together. This was difficult as the four others were all serving members of the regiment, but as soon as the opportunity would present itself, we would go out and enjoy an evening together. I was one of the first of us to own my own place and it was always the nominated crash-pad after a night out.

"We would invariably stop for a late-night snack on the way home and wander the last few feet to the house. Olly was always serious about his food and would sit alone in the lounge to enjoy the culinary masterpiece served in a polystyrene box. The rest of us would stand in the kitchen to devour our complete dietary dish! Some time later, those of us in the kitchen would ask: 'where is Olly?' One of us would wander through to the lounge to see where Mr D had gone. I recall only ever once finding him asleep on the sofa. On every other occasion, Olly would have vanished! His dark-brown boaters would be sitting politely on the carpet, waiting for their master. He always walked out of the house, unbeknownst to us, without his shoes?! We would always find him some time later the following morning, as he had to be reunited with his shoes! Olly would later explain that he had received a text from his lady of the moment, offering a more comfortable bed for the night. He is missed every time we get together: his dry humour, intelligent arguments and dashing good looks leave our nights feeling like someone should be with us."


Pte Jeff Doherty, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (103)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Coventry, West Midlands

Died: 12 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Killed after coming under fire while on patrol

His mother Joyce: "We love that our son is remembered by The Daily Telegraph and the city that he was born in, Coventry, where a beautiful red oak has been planted for him in the city’s War Memorial Park.

"JJ was a very proud Paratrooper who lived for the moment and loved life in every way. There is not a moment of the day we do not speak or think of him; he is very sadly missed by his family in Southam: Jeff, his father, Joyce, his mum, his siblings Shanna, Fintan and Honey-Bea. He is also greatly missed by his Parachute Regiment family and all the other people who knew and loved him. God Bless JJ, till we meet again."

Capt Sean Dolan, 40

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (104)

Service: Army

Regiment: Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters

From: , Cheshire

Died: 30 June 2007

Location: Helmand, Qaleh-e-Gaz

Incident: Part of a group observing Taliban fighters when a mortar attack was launched

His son Ashley: "A lot of my memories about me and my Dad include football. He brought me up on football and we supported Wolverhampton Wanderers. One thing that sticks out in my mind was after we had been comprehensively beaten one afternoon. I wanted to drown my sorrows at a local burger van before the drive home. But, being 14 at the time, I was completely unaware of my surroundings and a rather nasty brawl that was about to break out. Lo and behold, barely five seconds after getting my burger a 10-man fight started right next to me. I had no chance to react as my Dad, in one swift movement, picked me up and carried me away to safety. At the time I was just chuffed to still have my burger, but now I'm older I really appreciate that my Dad could have got seriously hurt. But he didn't consider that for a moment and just stepped in to save his son.

"That's exactly how my Dad was. Despite his dangerous job, he'd always make sure me and my Mum were safe. That is a fantastic lasting quality and one I have carried with me now I've grown up and got married. It will be there when I have my own children. I wish he could have been there with me when I got married, but deep down I know he was. I had a painting of him up in the room, so I could see him while I was walking down the aisle. Deep down, I knew he was there in spirit."

Gdsmn Neil Downes, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (105)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Manchester

Died: 09 June 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died on patrol with the Afghan National Army when his Land Rover was hit by an explosion

His mother Sharon: "Here’s my quote for him: 'Don’t be mad, don’t be sad, I died doing what I wanted to do and joining the British Army was it.'"

Sqn Ldr Anthony Downing, 34

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (106)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF Kinloss

From: Dover, Kent

Died: 23 December 2011

Location: Kabul

Incident: Died at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, after his vehicle was struck by an IED south of Kabul

His Squadron Leader Paul Lipscomb: "Ant’s unbeatable enthusiasm inspired others to climb well above their grade and succeed in all tasks; or at least, in the face of failure, to earn the bragging rights to an epic hill day. He is one of the best examples of the courage and commitment that has typified RAF Mountain Rescue Team members for nearly 70 years.

"He was also a good friend, who I hoped would succeed me as the Commanding Officer and his infectious sense of adventure would have strengthened and enriched it for all. I have been lucky enough to know Ant Downing for over 10 years, first as an engineer and then, more true to his spirit, as a mountaineer, and in the same way as if he had died in an avalanche or a fall helping others in the mountains, then I can draw some comfort in knowing that he died doing something he enjoyed and chose to do. What’s more he will have made a positive difference to all those he worked with."


Rgr Anare Draiva, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (107)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Irish Regiment

From: Suva, Fiji

Died: 01 September 2006

Location: Helmand

Incident: Killed in a mortar attack on base

His best friend Cpl Seremaia Cataki: “Dee was a cheerful person - always smiling. It never showed if he was tired or fed-up. He always put others first and would get along with everyone he met. Dee was the ‘older brother’ of the group, being more mature and someone that the other younger Rangers could look up to. I lost a role model as well as a close friend.”

Cpl Cataki, who trained with Rgr Draiva and joined up at the same time, says his friend had lost his father not long before he joined the Army, so his loved ones back home in Suva, Fiji, lost not only a son, but the head of their family and someone they could look up to.

L/Cpl Adam Drane, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (108)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk

Died: 07 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Shot while carrying out security duties at a checkpoint

His colleague Paul Kelley: "L/Cpl Adam Drane was the greatest man that I’ve ever met. During our time together as Vikings [members of Royal Anglian] we were nearly always side by side. Adz was on a promotion cadre and had already been on a tour of Afghanistan when I arrived at the battalion. We became best friends through a love of music when he returned to Pirbright camp as a budding young leader. The fact that he was such a nice, funny, genuine, down to earth guy, as well as an excellent and brave soldier was a massive inspiration to me and everyone from our platoon. We were confident going to war together. When our time came we couldn’t have been closer. Despite doing an amazing job on the front line, everyone changes in some way on tour but Adz was a rock throughout. Whether we were head-banging to some heavy metal in our bed space back at camp or protecting our comrades from an Afghan rooftop, his quality as a friend and soldier never faltered. Since he was taken from us, members of our old platoon have had the pleasure of really getting to know Adam’s civilian friends and family. We meet at least twice a year to enjoy a few drinks and memories of him together. It is a tradition that we hope will continue for many years to come. We couldn’t be prouder of who he was and everything that he did – a true hero to everyone that had the pleasure of knowing him. We all love and miss you massively mate, Kels xx."

Capt Martin Driver, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (109)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Barnsley, Yorkshire

Died: 15 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala district

Incident: Died in Selly Oak Hospital, Birmigham, following an IED blast while on patrol

His family: "We are heartbroken by the tragic loss of our beloved Martin. He was such a caring young man who always put his family first. He touched the lives of all who had the privilege to know him. He died doing a job he loved. His dedication and professionalism will remain an inspiration to all. Martin always wanted to be a soldier and an officer. We are so proud of his efforts. His legacy shall never be forgotten. He has touched so many with his love and compassion. We as his family, like others, shall always keep him in our hearts."

Lt Edward Drummond-Baxter, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (110)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: County Durham

Died: 30 October 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Shot by a man in Afghan police uniform

His father David Baxter: "The first surprise came about ten days after Edward’s death. We had written to University College London, where he had gone to university, notifying them of his death and a few days later, my wife Helen and I received a letter offering condolences – and informing us that Edward was a published author. Apparently his written thesis for his finals in 2002 had been published in the July 2010 issue of The Journal of Applied Social Psychology. Then, shortly before Edward’s inquest in November 2013, Helen and I, and our daughter Emily, were invited to an unveiling at the National Memorial Arboretum in memory of seven Special Observers who had died in action, including Edward. The status qualifies the soldier to infiltrate behind enemy lines and report intelligence back to HQ, and apparently only nine in every 200 applicants qualify – but we had no idea Edward had been awarded it before we received this invitation.

''He had also qualified as an instructor in jungle warfare by spending six weeks living in a jungle in Brunei surrounded by the most venomous reptiles, insects and spiders on earth. Again, we knew nothing of this until after Edward’s death.

''Edward was not a braggart and the biggest surprise was that having achieved so much, he was so modest.

''He was on this earth for 10,838 days and apart from the first three weeks after birth - he was born prematurely and we did not know whether he would survive - and the announcement of his death – he never caused us any grief. We miss Edward every day; he always came home whenever he could and it was not unusual to get a knock on the door at 1am, Edward having caught the last available train from London to Newcastle. In unguarded moments, we still think about his next leave."


Cpl Steven Dunn, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (111)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Corps of Signals

From: Gateshead, Tyne and Wear

Died: 21 December 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed when his vehicle hit an IED

His mother Vicky Dunn: "There was always little room for half-measures or failure for Steven. Even at a young age, he was unbelievably organised and had a brilliant memory, he became more and more opinionated the older he got. The good friends he made through nursery, school and adulthood remained his friends for life. Steven gave true friendship and loyalty and had it returned by many.

"He was football obsessed; a Newcastle fanatic; he went to every home and away match he could. His childhood bedroom was a shrine of black and white. Even when he was away on tour, we’d often say we half-expected him to turn up ready for the match. It had been Steven’s goal to achieve his Parachute wings and he was extremely proud, as were we, when he fulfilled his ambition. He thrived on the adrenaline and tough lifestyle of his chosen career. He kept up his strict fitness routine and was often seen running along the banks of the River Tyne. When Steven’s daughter Emily, was born his paternal instincts shone through. It was a joy to witness the special bond between father and daughter. We will ensure that Emily will always know how much she was loved by her dad. At 6pm on Tuesday, December 21, 2010, our lives changed irreparably with that knock at the door. Life is not the same; you go through the motions, but it’s a life sentence.

"We are so proud of him, but we were proud of him before this. No words could ever describe our loss. I have literally lost a part of me and we have lost a massive part of our family, but the love we have for Steven will never waver, he will always be in our hearts. He was our Steven. Like all the others, they’re not numbers, they’re people and they’re loved. All we can do is make sure they’re remembered and that their sacrifice is never forgotten."

Kgn Jason Dunn-Bridgeman, 20

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Liverpool

Died: 13 September 2009

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Shot after his platoon became locked in an exchange of fire while on a foot patrol

His mother Tracy: "Jason brought joy into our family from the day he was born.He was someone who you wanted to be around whether you were up or down.He was a kind and caring young man with a great zest for life and adventure. He had a mischievous side but could also show a great strength of character way beyond his years at times of others’ need. He always wanted to be a soldier and stayed focused to achieve his dreams.The Regiment remembered the loss of Jason by the tactical flash of the black lion that they now wear. In his 20 short years, he did and gave so much more than those of us he left behind will do in our lifetime.I feel his legacy is to live, to love, do what makes you happy and be proud of who you are because I think that is how he would have wanted to be remembered."

RM Neil Dunstan, 32

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Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 3 Commando Brigade, UK Landing Force Command Support Group

From: Bournemouth, Dorset

Died: 12 November 2008

Location: Helmand, Garmsir area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on joint patrol with Afghan forces

His mother Sue Thwaites: "Neil was lively, full of fun, he loved sport, had loads of friends, was fluent in French, and he was loving. My neighbours remember him as always doing everything to the best of his ability, second best was not good enough. He loved riding, and he swam for Dorset. He was very active. He also loved music. He played the trumpet at school and he taught himself the guitar. He’d sing to the other Marines. He was humming during shooting practice one day, so the chap in charge made him sing the song over the loud speaker. It didn't stop him. He was humming a tune to himself when he was killed.

"There were lots of little scrapes he got up to; he was a practical joker. He climbed up the flag pole of a five-star hotel to get the flag. He tried to let the tyres down on the police car outside the club he was in. He was just a little bit lively.

"He loved mountaineering. He was going to go into the Mountain Leaders (an elite cadre of the Royal Marines, who are experts in arctic warfare and mountain climbing). He loved it because it was dangerous and he loved a challenge, an adventure. I think that’s why he went into the Marines. He tried to have a normal job in insurance but he just came home one day and said, I can’t cope with this any longer.

"The gap he has left is absolute. I miss him constantly. He left me a letter. It says, 'don’t be too sad and go and enjoy your crazy animals' (I keep sheep which I show). He just said how much he appreciated everything that had happened and that he’d had a lovely life."

Csgt Krishnabahadur Dura, 36

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (114)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Lamjung district, western nepal

Died: 15 November 2008

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was struck by a blast. It was the first fatal attack on a Warrior tank

His CO Lt Col Chris Darby: "Colour Sgt Krishna was an exceptional soldier, a gifted leader and consummate professional. His knowledge of his trade and of his men was without parallel, and the team he forged based on this knowledge and his own commitment was second to none. He was intelligent, brave and strong; he was a gifted leader; and he was a Commander with the highest potential. I was extremely proud to have known this bold and noble man and will miss him. He will not be forgotten."

L/Bdr James Dwyer, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (115)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

His CO Lt Col Neil Wilson: "James was a bright, motivated young man who displayed all the characteristics of a commando soldier. He was extremely popular within the Regiment and undoubtedly would have progressed through the ranks rapidly."

Capt Alex Eida, 29

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery

From: Coulsdon, Surrey

Died: 01 August 2006

Location: Helmand

Incident: Patrol attacked with RPGs and heavy machine guns

His family: "At all times we have tried to take a positive attitude to Alex's death, in spite of the fact that he has been prevented from enjoying a full life and from fulfilling what, by all accounts, would have been a very successful military career. He lives on in anecdotes from friends and colleagues, questions and observations from our grandsons, in songs on the radio and so many other things in everyday life that trigger a memory or recognition. Alex had never been happier than when he joined the Army in 2001. Several contemporaries of his at Sandhurst have told us of times in training when their situations were so grim that they were near to tears, but Alex revelled in it all, his face wreathed in a permanent grin, and evidently his attitude was the same when he joined his regiment. So we feel that, although his life was cut short, he had made an impact and had achieved so much more than many do in a normal lifespan, and this helps us to live with his loss."

Pte Gavin Elliott, 19

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Woodsetts, South Yorkshire

Died: 03 September 2009

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Died en route to hospital after sustaining gunshot wound on foot patrol

His family: "Gavin was a much-loved son, grandson, brother, nephew and friend. For all those who knew Gavin, there will be a void that will never be filled. In our eyes, Gavin was a hero and the best son and soldier we could have ever wished for. Quite simply, Gavin, we love you and we will never forget you."

Pte Kevin Elliott, 24

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment

From: Dundee, Angus

Died: 31 August 2009

Location: Helmand, north of Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed in a blast, thought to have been caused by an RPG, while on foot patrol

His friend Barry Delaney, who attended Pte Elliott's funeral in a bright-green Primark dress to honour a pact they had made: “He was such a livewire, always full of energy. Every moment with Kevin was a good time. He wanted to put a smile on everyone’s face.”

His grandmother Joan, who is a member of the Stop The War Coalition: “He knew how I felt about the war. But he couldn’t get a job full-time and was working in a post office for 20 hours a week. He didn’t believe in signing on and wanted to have a career.”

His comrade Pte Kyle Russell: “My fondest memory of him was sitting in the back of a vehicle, screaming out the words to ‘I Got You Babe’ at the top of his voice.”

Cpl Liam Elms, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (119)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Wigan

Died: 31 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed when he triggered an IED during a routine patrol

His father Mike: "We have got photographs of Liam aged five years old in his army gear. He always wanted to be a soldier. His Nanny Pat used to make him uniforms and he was always in camouflage – you could never find him. He really wanted to be a Royal Marine, as they were the elite, and he was proud of what he did. He died doing the job he loved.

His friend Stuart Lawley, on Facebook, on the fourth anniversary of Liam's death: "Four years today, mate. Always thinking of you mate. RIP Royal. I have no port where I am, so Captain Morgans will have to be drunk in honour of you this year mate."

L/Cpl Dane Elson, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Harare, Zimbabwe

Died: 05 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Babaji, near Gereshk

Incident: Killed by an IED during an attack on a compound

His father and stepmother Stuart and Alison: "Dane was born in Zimbabwe, brought up in England but considered himself Welsh. At the age of six he came to live with myself, Alison, and Alison’s daughters, Jessica and Becky, in Stroud, Gloucester, but had spent a great deal of time with us previously. Dane showed an aptitude for two things - sport and being naughty! I’ve so many stories to tell about him I’ve thought about writing a book. From hiding his sprouts in his Christmas cracker to flushing Becky’s treasured collection of bath pearls down the toilet.

"Dane was academically very bright and beyond his years in some subjects. However, this meant he was easily bored, which in turn led to him getting up to mischief. In an attempt to get him through his final year of education he stayed with my parents in Devon and attended the local school. One day after being asked to leave the classroom due to his disruptiveness, he slammed the door and the handle came off in his hand. Being Dane, he decided to leave the school, taking the handle with him, and leaving the teacher and over 30 children unable to get out!

"After his return to Wales, we chatted about his future and I suggested we go along to the Army recruiting office in Cardiff. Dane was immediately keen to know more and soon afterwards took the entry exam to join up. We were immensely proud when he achieved such a high pass mark that he was selected to attend the Army Foundation College in Harrogate. He joined the Welsh Guards and served in Iraq and Bosnia prior to Afghanistan. Although he continued to live life to the full, he matured into a fine and respected soldier, being promoted to Lance Corporal, aged 22.

"Dane was killed on July 5, 2009, during Operation Panther’s Claw. His military headstone reads 'Man of Courage. Son of Wales'."

His mother Debby Morris: "Everyone who knew Dane loved him, and it was no wonder why. He was kind, thoughtful, always putting others before himself. He had such a cheeky grin which was evident when you saw him or looked at his photos. He was always smiling.

"As a son he was the best, I know all mothers say that but we had a very special bond. On a Friday, when he was due home from camp, his dad and sister used to say, 'Look out wonder boy's home this weekend, we won't get a look in!' They were only joking, of course, as they were looking forward to having him home also.

"Friday night was always our special night. He would phone up from camp and say, 'Mam, I am on my way, what's the traffic like?' As myself or his dad had invariably been out on the roads travelling with our jobs, we always used to give him tips on the quickest way home. If he was early we used to all go out to the local pub, have a few drinks and then have an Indian takeaway, followed by a rather copious amount of JDs! He would roll around the floor with our big dog Lucky, who absolutely adored him and, as you can imagine, things would go flying.

"If he was running late he would meet us up the pub, and as he walked down the path he would be beaming at me through the window. As he walked through the door, the regulars would shout, 'Here comes mammy's little soldier'. He loved it and wasn't embarrassed at all, he would walk over and give me a massive hug and kiss. He so loved his Mam.

"Dane was a mischievous child, always in trouble at school. We were always being called there for one reason or another but he didn't have a malicious bone in his body. It was always the older boys that used to put him up to it, and Dane being Dane just used to do it. Our hearts have been torn apart by Dane's death and there isn't a moment goes by that he is not in our thoughts. He was and always will be our beautiful, precious Dane, always loved, always treasured."

Sgt Jonathan Eric Kups, 38

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (121)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Nuneaton, Warwickshire

Died: 21 September 2012

Location: Helmand, Camp Bastion

Incident: An inquest recorded that he committed suicide at Camp Bastion

His family: "Jonathan was a wonderful husband and loving father to three children. He was a loyal man with a wide circle of friends, a devoted son, son-in-law, grandson and brother."

His children: “You're the best Dad; always in our hearts–- our hero.”

Cpl Joseph Etchells, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (122)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

From: Mossley, Greater Manchester

Died: 19 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on foot patrol

His colleague Lt Col Charlie Calder: "Cpl Etchells was a remarkable young man. He showed a gift for soldiering that touched all who worked with him. His enthusiasm, determination, loyalty and professionalism would have seen him progress with ease through the ranks. Above all, he will be remembered for the friendships that he easily made; at home, in barracks or facing daily adversity in Afghanistan."

The Battalion: "His friends mourn his loss. However our loss is nothing compared to the loss sustained by his fiancee, and his family. Our prayers are now for them, Julie and their daughter."

L/Cpl Peter Eustace, 26

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Liverpool, Merseyside

Died: 16 November 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an IED while on joint patrol with the Afghan National Army

His mother Carol Horan: "Peter was a proper boy when he was little. We lived on a hill and he had a three-wheeler bike, and every day he would go to the top of the hill even though the bike had no brakes and he’d just zoom down and use his feet as support. He was a very bubbly and lively child and he used to love going to the big play area at the International Garden Festival site in Liverpool to play in all the different ball pools and on the swings – I have good memories of that. He liked fishing too, but that only lasted a short while because he got a fishing hook stuck in his nose. We all laugh at that now.

"He wanted to join the Army from the age of 11. He was a painter and decorator for six months while he was training and then he signed up when he was 17. He loved it. Before he died, he told his dad he wanted to go all the way, climb the ladder.

"He had a close circle of friends and all his mates still come round for a drink and go to the cemetery and put flowers down. It was three years in November for us since he died, and sometimes I feel like he’s still going to walk through the door. Sometimes I wake up and think, I can hear him coming in, and going, ‘Mum, it’s only me’. It does get harder each year. People say it gets easier but it doesn’t, because reality hits you.

"Peter had a lovely smile and was happy and friendly to everyone, polite and loud – all the Army lads used to say you’d hear him before you’d see him because you’d hear that big voice of his. Everything about him was amazing, he was a good boy. We’re all proud of our sons."


RM Tony Evans, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (124)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Tyne and Wear, Sunderland

Died: 27 November 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Attacked with RPGs while on the roof of a building

His close friend Ryan Surtees: "Loyal, strong and bold; a beautiful boy with a heart of gold. Cheeky confident and always on the go. All I have to say is good because you are amazing in every way. I miss you so much, like Terry and Demi. Tears cried, oh God so many. Your mam and dad, you did them proud. A decent lad that stuck out in a crowd. Forever grateful, Ryan."

Lt Mark Evison, 26

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Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Dulwich, London

Died: 12 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Haji Halem

Incident: Died in hospital in Birmingham after being shot in Helmand

His friend James Kayll: "Mark was talented in everything he tried, from the strings of the cello to the slopes of the Alps. Enthusiastic in life, Mark lit the way for many friends and indeed his soldiers in the Welsh Guards. He inspired everyone whose path he crossed and during his tragically short military career he’d already earned the nicknamed 007. This was less likely to be due to his unrivalled ability to charm young ladies and ride fast motorbikes, but more likely a result of his charisma, flair and style in front of the men he led.

"As a Platoon Commander, Mark built rapport and relationships with every man under his command. Today, his exemplary leadership is studied and celebrated at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. The incredibly heroic effort and immense courage under fire showed by his platoon to try and save his life, pays huge testament to the respect and high regard they held for Mark.

"There is seldom a day when I do not remember Mark; his friendship, the banter and the fun times he inflicted on everyone. In 2011, together with three of Mark’s friends, we rowed across the Indian Ocean for the Mark Evison Foundation. Under a canopy of stars I used to believe he was there with us; he was the sort of person who would have wanted to come along. Loved dearly by his family, friends and soldiers we are all so thankful that we knew Mark."

RM David Fairbrother, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (126)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Blackburn, Lancashire

Died: 19 September 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed in an ambush while on patrol with Afghan troops

His mother: "David, not only are you the sunshine of my life but you were a devoted, beautiful and giving son. I am so proud of the determination you had to become a Royal Marine. You were always fun-loving, caring and lived life to the full. Not only were you the perfect son but you were my best friend and you will be in my thoughts for ever."

His younger sister Emily: "My brother, my best friend, my hero. The life and soul of every party."


Rfn Luke Farmer, 19

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Pontefract, West Yorkshire

Died: 15 January 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His father Mark: "I was the proudest Dad at his passing out parade. I felt 20 feet tall the day Luke received the award for the fittest soldier within his intake. He could have one day gone to the Olympics as a 100m sprinter, he was that fast."

His mother Angela: "Luke was a young man who didn’t cause us any problems. He was well-loved by us and his extended family and friends. He was a good rugby league player who played for Upton Amateur Rugby Football Club. His favourite rugby league team were the Castleford Tigers. He will be missed by all including the friends and his cousin who he joined up with."

His elder brother Scott: "He was simply the bestest brother."

His grandfather Derek: "Luke was a brilliant grandson. We’ll always remember the times we took him and his brothers on holiday."

L/Sgt Tobie Fasfous, 29

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Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Bridgend, South Wales

Died: 28 April 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on foot patrol

His girlfriend Kelly Gore: "Everyone knew Tobie, and everyone loved him. He was like a big, friendly giant. The Army was his life. He loved the Welsh Guards but his ambition was to be an Apache pilot. On April Fools' Day he phoned me and said he was going out there in three days. Because of the date I thought he was being silly at first. There were boys out there who needed R&R and they didn't have enough cover so they asked the Welsh Guards and, Tobie being Tobie, he volunteered. The day before he left, we talked about his funeral - what songs he wanted, everyone in Welsh Rugby shirts or Cardiff Blues. I felt a bit better knowing that. Of course I was hoping I didn't have to use any of it, but it was a blessing that he still had his say.

"The Christmas before he died, we went to Dubai where his mum lives. When I went to Wootton Bassett for the repatriation, his mum gave me an engagement ring. She said: 'Tobie picked that out when he was over and he was going to ask you to marry him.' It doesn't get easier. It fits into your life, that's the only way I can describe it. I'm an air hostess, I've got to have a big smile on my face. But I feel it every single day. I think about him or things remind me of him. But you live with it. It's just part of you now."

WO2 Spencer Faulkner, 38

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Service: Army

Regiment: Air Corps

From: Newbury, Berkshire

Died: 26 April 2014

Location: Kandahar, Takhta Pul district

Incident: Died in a helicopter crash

His friend Stu Gillis: "Spen was a unique man; elite. The most intelligent, funny, honest and professional soldier that I had the pleasure to serve with, only accepting the highest of standards from himself and those lucky enough to be around him. He could have you buckled, laughing at his antics and hilarious mannerisms. He enjoyed de-briefing himself harshly as much as he did others.

"Spen was inspirational. There were so many qualities that made you 'want to be more like Spen', professionally or otherwise. He was the best of friends, someone you wanted to be near. He cannot be replaced. Forever with me, never forgotten."

L/Cpl Steven Fellows, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (130)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

Died: 12 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed in an explosion when his Jackal armoured vehicle hit an IED

His mother Ann: "My son was a fun-loving comic, who could tell a tale and have his mates bent double. He adored his wife Natalie, he also loved his siblings and tried to visit everyone when he was on R&R. His comrades nicknamed him the 'Ginger Lion', his bravery shone out. As his Mum, words cannot express the total feeling of loss and pride I feel every day. MISS YOU JAMIE.x"

Rfn Andrew Fentiman, 23

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Died: 15 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by small arms fire while on foot patrol

His mother Linda: "He was interested in military matters from his early teens. He joined the Air Cadets and went on to do their young leadership scheme. He then joined the Air Training Corps at university. Later, he joined the Territorial Army in Milton Keynes and he wanted to join up as an officer. He volunteered to go to Afghanistan for a tour because he wanted to get a bit of experience under his belt. He said he didn't think it was right to lead men if he hadn’t experienced it himself. He went at the end of September 2009 and he died on November 15. We had one letter in the short time he was there. He asked that we send some supplies so he could give them to the children. Pencils and those sorts of things. He loved kids. He had a kind heart."

"He found a girl we were sure he would have married had he come back. And she is still part of our life. It is a great loss to us that she isn't going to be our daughter-in-law.

"The grief can catch you in odd ways and unexpectedly. A butterfly sets us off. That epitomised Andrew. He flitted from one thing to another. At the funeral there was this tortoiseshell butterfly that flitted around the church and landed on the shoulder of one of the Air Cadet friends who had done great things in helping arrange the funeral and the wake. It was poignant. The butterfly was there again when two of his closest friends got married - the same kind of butterfly. And this year on my birthday I went up to the churchyard to tend the grave and out from the church popped the butterfly and landed on my cheek. Whenever we see a tortoiseshell now it sends us off in floods."

His father Kevin: "November 11 is always an extremely difficult day. It was the last time I ever spoke to Andrew. They had just had their Remembrance Service and - typical him - he had managed to get hold of a satellite phone to call me. It was only for a couple of minutes and he was asking me to send some supplies out to him. His brother, Adam, also managed to have a few words. He seemed quite buoyant despite the fact he found the way they treated women and children a bit medieval."


WO2 Ian Fisher, 42

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Barking, London

Died: 05 November 2013

Location: Helmand, Kamparack

Incident: Killed by a vehicle-borne suicide attack while on patrol

His widow Emma: "Ian will always be the centre of my life, he will be remembered as a doting father, loving husband and a true professional soldier."

Fsr Samuel Flint, 21

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Blackpool, Lancashire

Died: 30 April 2013

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed along with two others while travelling in an army vehicle hit by an IED

His family: "The whole family is completely devastated. Everyone should know that Sam loved his job and made his whole family and everyone who knew him very proud.

"He was always the life and soul of the party, a real ladies’ man, witty, funny, the real cheeky chappy. He was a loving son – the protective brother, courageous nephew, the caring uncle, the most loyal grandson that anyone would wish to have.

"We want to thank everyone for the kind tributes and strong support. Always in our hearts and minds, we love you Sam."

L/Cpl Michael Foley, 25

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Service: Army

Regiment: Adjutant General's Corps

From: Burnley, Lancashire

Died: 26 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Shot and killed at Lashkar Gah Main Operating Base by an Afghan National Army soldier

Major A J Smith, Royal Corps of Signals, Deputy Chief of Staff: "He was one of those people you meet and like immediately; friendly, cheeky, reliable and an all-round good bloke. I cannot recall seeing him when he was not smiling – indeed my banter with him was a daily highlight!"

Pte Ben Ford, 18

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Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment Worcesters and Foresters

From: Chesterfield, Derbyshire

Died: 05 September 2007

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Caught by an IED during fighting with Taliban

His mother Jane: "Thirty-six hours before Ben was killed he was out on patrol with a reporter and photographer from the Derby Telegraph. The photographer, Adam, later told us about the time he spent with Ben. The journalists were quite nervous as there had been a lot of action so Ben kept things as light as possible, singing and teasing the interpreter. When they took a break, Ben emptied a box on to the tailgate of the WMIK [Weapons Mount Installation Kit Land Rover], the vehicle that he was later blown out of when he was killed. There were crisps, biscuits, some fruit, chocolate - the typical Army rations - and then there was this revolting sandwich, which looked as though it had been half-eaten and rolled in the sand. Ben told them, 'you can choose anything you like but this sandwich is mine. I nicked it from the Americans.' It broke the tension and made everyone laugh. Everyone had the same opinion of Ben: that his jokes were crap but his heart was so big that he couldn’t help trying to make everyone feel safe."

L/Cpl Mathew Ford, 30

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Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Immingham, Lincolnshire

Died: 15 January 2007

Location: Helmand, Garmsir

Incident: Shot while attacking an insurgent base, MoD says 'friendly fire' but inquest in December 2008 proved inconclusive

His mother Joan: "Mathew was a gentle giant with a heart of gold. Every time he was on leave he used to say, 'Fetched you a present, Mum.' It was always a kitbag of washing. Mathew was a brave man and I always called him my number one. He will never be forgotten and will always be loved."

C Sjt Kevin Fortuna, 36

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Portsmouth, Hampshire

Died: 23 May 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

His widow Nia: "Kev spent a lot of time away from home, either on exercise or deployment. He loved his job and would take his responsibilities as a senior NCO very seriously. Despite being such a committed soldier, Kev would never forget about his family life either. I could guarantee that wherever he was in the world, he would always remember my birthday or our wedding anniversary, and beautiful bouquets of flowers would be delivered to remind me that he had not forgotten."

Spr Darren Foster, 20

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Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Carlisle, Cumbria

Died: 13 August 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by small arms fire whilst manning a sangar in order to provide security to his colleagues in Patrol Base Sangin Fulo

His Section Commander Cpl John Rutter: "Sapper ‘Cookie’ Foster was a Sapper through and through; although new to the Squadron he possessed the qualities and capabilities of a soldier beyond his years. He gained the name ‘Cookie’ by making the mistake of telling the section that cooking was a passion of his and was duly appointed Head Engineer Chef. However, this was not the only reason why he shone within the section. It was his hardworking and enthusiastic approach to work, accompanied with his friendly personality that made him the Sapper he was. As an intelligent and skilled Sapper he fitted in with the section from the start and was liked by all. We only had the privilege of knowing ‘Cookie’ since he deployed and joined us at forward operating base Sangin Fulod, but within that time he made a lasting impression on us all that we will never forget."

Pte Robert Foster, 19

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Harlow, Essex

Died: 23 August 2007

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: One of three killed when US F15 providing air support to ground troops dropped bomb

His colleague L/Cpl Stevie Veal: "Fozzy, as he was known by all, will be remembered for never turning a dare down. He was up for anything and kept the comedy value of the section up when it was most needed. He was a model for the British Army. It was a privilege to serve with him and we will never forget him."

CFN Andrew Found, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (140)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Whitby, Yorkshire

Died: 16 June 2011

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while dealing with a bomb-damaged vehicle

His widow Samantha: "You’re my husband, my best friend and are my world. I cannot explain my pain and the hole you have left in all our lives. You are the best husband anyone could have wished for; a great dad, friend, and you have touched the hearts of many in your life.

"You loved your job, your family and friends and always loved a good joke. You always made me smile. I will love you always and forever. You were my rock and my hero and always will be. I love you so much."


Sgt Paul Fox, 34

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (141)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Manchester, Greater Manchester

Died: 26 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His Commanding Officer, Lt Col Harry Fullerton: "Sgt Paul Fox was an exceptional soldier who came to the BRF as an eager volunteer. During selection and training, it was clear that he was one of the best in the Squadron. He was a consummate professional, somebody who inspired others and led from the front. Such a display of soldiering marked him out as special. He gave everything for the good of his comrades and his death brings an unfathomable loss to B Squadron. Our thoughts are with his family at this time."

Pte Anthony Frampton, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (142)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

Died: 06 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah Durai

Incident: Killed when Warrior armoured vehicle was hit by an IED

His mother Margaret Charlesworth: "We had an amazing bond. Anton even had a tattoo on his arm with a red heart and 'Mum'. Of course, the other soldiers took the mick out of him for it but he would always laugh it off.

"He was a very gentle boy growing up and I was surprised when he decided to join the Army but he wanted to see the world. Wherever he went, Canada, the Falkland Islands, he would always call me up as often as possible. Even when they were training in far-flung bits of England, he had a Fijian friend in the battalion who would drive him around to find a phone signal so he could call me.

"He was very worried about going to Afghanistan, he even told his friends that he wouldn't be coming back, but still he volunteered to deploy earlier than the majority of the Regiment. The few weeks he was there we talked a lot. I sent him parcels: sweets, socks, that sort of thing. The last time we spoke before he was killed he said he had just received a parcel and was really pleased with it. Then he told me to take his bank card, and take his sister and stepfather out for a meal with it. I told him I wouldn't dream of touching his money. I miss him so much. He will always be my beautiful boy."


L/Cpl James Fullarton, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (143)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

From: Coventry, Warwickshire

Died: 16 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Died in an explosion while on patrol

L/Cpl Kielan Walker, who had known L/Cpl Fullarton since primary school: "I knew Jay all my life. We used to finish school then go down Profit Park and play football every night. He wouldn’t go home until he’d won. He was the most competitive sportsman I’d ever met. We both joined the Battalion near enough the same time and I watched him grow into a perfect soldier, proud of his cap badge, proud of his job and glad to be in the Army.

“He could always be relied on to summarise the worst of situations in a few choice words. His favourite was: ‘I can’t be arsed with this.’ And it always cut through the tension, cleared the air. He had an incredible knack for lifting those around him.

“There were more than 1,600 people at his funeral to say goodbye to him, which tells you all you need to know about him."

Cpl Tom Gaden, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (144)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Taunton, Somerset

Died: 25 February 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was struck by an IED

His parents Judy and Nick: '"We are immensely proud of Tom. He was loyal to his comrades and they all reported that he was a good guy to work with and for. Tom's personality was one full of life. He kept his fitness up when he was on leave as his Army career was of primary importance. He was a good father to Lucy and, although she was a surprise happening, he adjusted well. We lived in the same street so babysitting was always available and we were pleased to be able to help out as Lucy was our first grandchild. His son, Charlie, was born three months after he died.

"Tom enjoyed off-roading on his Honda TL125 with his Dad when he got the chance, and liked nothing more than to have gone down a sticky lane and safely negotiated it, albeit covered in mud. He was the person I turned to for advice on how to ride a motorbike; I’d never sat on a bike before but his ability to teach inspired me to learn with an instructor and eventually take my test. I know he was very proud of my achievement, as was I of his teaching ability.

"I still miss him dreadfully and I know, as his mother, that will never change – how can it? He was home for the last time at Christmas 2008. His priority was his new family, but he still made time to spend with us and his brother and sister. If only we had realised how precious that time was."

Pte Daniel Gamble, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (145)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Uckfield, East Sussex

Died: 08 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a suicide bomber while on foot patrol

His brother Jason: "Daniel was an extremely intelligent young man who put his all into everything he did in life. This is what allowed him to become a member of the 2nd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, and how, out of 150 soldiers, he was one of only 10 selected to be trained as a Pashto linguist. He tried to understand the Afghan culture in order to make a difference. His bravery and empathy set him apart from his peers; always on the side of the underdog, he was there to lend a sympathetic ear and could not abide bullies.

"Daniel was planning a career in the Special Forces, as the military was his calling. He was extremely proud of being part of an elite regiment and cared deeply for his Brothers in Arms.

"When his battalion came back from their tour after Daniel's death, a lot of his comrades came and stayed with us. Telling stories about Daniel gave us an insight into life on the front line and how highly regarded he was. They told us about the night before he was killed, that 10 of them were all huddled together, sitting on a small camp bed around his solar-powered portable DVD player, which had a screen dimension of 6x4in, watching a movie and laughing together. This gives us all great comfort that, even though he was miles from home, he was with his second family.

"Away from the Army, Daniel was a keen karaoke singer, a car enthusiast and was a hugely popular character. He was always surrounded by people who admired and respected him. He would have made a fantastic uncle, and it is sad that his nieces and nephews will never get to meet him. As a family, we could not be more proud of what Daniel achieved. He was brave and selfless in death, as he was in life. Daniel will be missed by more people than he could ever know. Daniel, we love you, our Hero."

Cpl Darryl Gardiner, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (146)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Salisbury, Wiltshire

Died: 20 January 2008

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was hit by a mine strike

His elder brother Sgt Paul Gardiner: "Not many people meet their hero, but I am lucky enough to say mine was my brother. Although I sometimes get emotional about it, actually, I don’t really feel anything other than pride. When he first went out, the family just thought he was going to be an armourer at Camp Bastion, but in fact he was out with the Brigade Reconnaissance Force. He was the guys’ lifeline for fixing all their weapons on the ground. Just before he was killed, he had been dealing with victims of a mine strike. He had put tourniquets on one guy who was badly hurt and had reassured him they would be in Bastion soon. Everyone said his conduct and his focus were amazing. The way he reacted, that’s what makes me proud. Every year we get together, the family and his close friends, on the weekend closest to his birthday on January 25. We call it Darryl Day. I think the biggest thing about him is he had time for everyone. He would always pop in and see people if he was passing. He has made me think, you shouldn’t rush and not have time for anyone. It could be the last time you see them."

Pte Darren George, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (147)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Pirbright, Surrey

Died: 09 April 2002

Location: Kabul

Incident: Shot by a colleague who had a 'dizzy spell' while handling a machine gun

His sister Beccy: "Darren was cheeky and funny and always made people laugh. He looked out for his family and friends. We used to laugh at each other after we finished having fights over cleaning or the television. He enjoyed his life so much and always wanted people to be proud of him.

"He really loved posing in the mirror, which never changed. Even when he joined the Army, he would still take hours to get ready.

"Darren was my big brother and my hero. Before Darren joined the Army, he always kept an eye on me and the rest of our brothers and sisters and would be there if any of us needed him. I won't ever forget how he looked out for us all. Darren saved my life so many times because I was so ill. When I nearly died from a major fit, Darren saved my life. The paramedics came to see us a few days later to see how I was doing and they told me if it wasn't for Darren, I wouldn't be alive today.

"I miss my brother every day. Some days, when I'm finding it hard I go and sit by his grave, even though I don't live near it - that doesn't stop me because it's the only time I feel him close and listening to me.

"After Darren died, all the family fell apart to never be fixed again."

Bdr Stephen Raymond Gilbert, 36

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (148)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: Dumfries

Died: 26 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died in Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, following a blast while on joint patrol with the Afghan National Army

His wife Jackie: "We as a family are so proud of Steve and everything he believed in. He was a fantastic father, and Connor and Kristian have not only lost their dad but their best friend. Steve was a devoted husband and we lived and laughed every day we shared. I do truly believe I was lucky enough to find my true soulmate. Steve will always be in my heart and will live on through his family and many close friends. Rest in peace my darling; I love you so much."

Capt Martin Wells, Fire Support Team Commander, 88 (Arracan) Battery: "Bombardier Stephen Gilbert was a soldier whose strength of character and consummate professionalism marked him apart from his peers. He always demonstrated a courage and calmness when on patrol and composure in the face of adversity that ensured, on more than one occasion, the safe return of his fellow soldiers. He was a father figure to the younger members of the Fire Support Team, a shoulder of support for them, and their welfare became his priority. He possessed a sense of humour remarkably similar to my own through which we connected and developed a rapport. He was immensely devoted to his family and we both took great pleasure in sharing stories and photos from home."

L/Cpl Martin Gill, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (149)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

Died: 05 June 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Shot dead by insurgents while on patrol

His uncle Paul Gunter: "Martin was a very determined lad. His father, Danny, died from cancer when he was just five. At age seven he was determined to swim a mile to raise money for charity in his Dad’s honour. His mother, Susan, died from cancer, just before he was due to be deployed to Afghanistan. He died 11 weeks after her death.

"In caring for his Mum, he was always there at the good and bad times for her and all of his extended family. He'd be there for us all with a laugh and joke at times of worry during his mother's illness. He would often drive down from his base in Scotland just for a few hours to be with her, his brother, sister and girlfriend. On periods of leave he would be decorating and keeping their house and garden in order while still finding time to be with his girlfriend.

"He was posted to 42 Commando only a few months before their deployment to Afghanistan. This to some would have been daunting, fitting in with others who'd lived and trained together for months. From the accounts given to us after his death, it seems he soon fitted in and was well liked. This is borne out by him asking for certain items to be sent out to him in the shoe box parcels. Herbs, spices, and anything he could use to flavour up the food for himself and the lads when on basic rations. He also made a makeshift Monopoly board game from a compo ration box to use in their down time. We are told this is now framed and adorns a centre part of the Black Knights social bar in Plymouth. He issuch aloved and missed part of our family.

"Sadly, as for Afghanistan, I fear it will go back to what it was when we leave, but that will never diminish what Martin and his colleagues achieved there and how proud we are of him."


Cpl Mike Gilyeat, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (150)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Military Police

From: Southport, Merseyside

Died: 30 May 2007

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Died, along with five US crew and a Canadian colleague, after a Nato Chinook was shot down

His father Mike: "Michael was a caring individual, with an infectious smile, keen to please and always going out of his way to help others. His heart was in the Forces from an early age, following in the footsteps of his grandfather and his father. Despite joining the RMP he really wanted to fly and, as a photographer attached to Media Ops in Afghanistan, he revelled in the flying opportunities that came his way.

"Losing him had an immense impact on all of his family and it is still a struggle to come to terms with, but he wouldn’t want us to be sad. He volunteered for Iraq, Ireland and Afghanistan totally believing in what he was doing and wanting to make a difference. We hope that it has."

RM Dale Gostick, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (151)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment:

From: Oxford, Oxfordshire

Died: 25 May 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was caught in blast

His comrade Cpl Simon Whitby: "Dale was a good friend but an even better ‘oppo’. His laid-back approach to life and the way he took everything in his stride meant that the majority of the troop had, at some point, sat with him to have a good ‘drip’ or moan. They would know full well that it would be Dale doing most of the ‘dripping’ and you doing the listening. It’s a sad day in the Corps. My thoughts are with his family, especially his girlfriend."

His comrade L/Cpl Dan Andrew: "Dale was a top bloke, there’s no question about it; if I was ever down or annoyed about something, I knew going to Dale would be the thing to do, knowing he would be on my level. Everyone got on with him and everyone will miss him. He was a ‘Bootneck’ through and through. The Company has lost a great bloke; he would find time for anyone. He’s sorely missed."

Pte Chris Gray, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (152)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Leicester

Died: 13 April 2007

Location: Helmand, Now Zad

Incident: Killed in a firefight with Taliban

His mother Helen: "I have a photograph of Christopher wearing his uniform and sitting on a rock in Kenya. There’s hills and blue skies behind and he has this look that says, 'I’ve made it, I’ve actually achieved what I always wanted'. Every time I look at that picture I have the same thought – he’s got his lot in life and this is what he wants to do.

"Shortly before he was sent to Afghanistan, Christopher came up from his training base and surprised me on Mother’s Day. I saw him walking up to the house and I ran outside and held him. Before he went back, he went shopping and bought me a bracelet with Swarovski crystals. That was the last present he ever gave me.

"Christopher was proud of his training, and he would have stayed in the Army all 24 years and made it his career. We got his first letter from Afghanistan on the morning of the day he died and it was full of beans. He was hoping to get home on R&R around his birthday and asked me to get some of his favourite banoffee pie.

"He always knew that he could die. I used to tell him off and tell him to keep his head down and he would laugh and say, 'Mum, it’s my job'. He didn’t want me to worry but he did tell his Dad that things were about to kick off in Afghanistan.

"I’ve got another photo of Christopher with his brothers and sister, Nathan and Liam and Katie, when they were younger. I cherish that picture because they all look so happy and complete. These are my children."

Cpl Richard Green, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (153)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Reading, Berkshire

Died: 02 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Shot while manning a vehicle checkpoint

His family: "When he was young, Rich was the type of boy who always fell off his bike or down the stairs. He was the boy who, when he was six, saw a shooting star on Christmas Eve and believed it was Father Christmas speeding around the world. He was the boy who smashed his elbow so badly he needed two operations and metal pins to put it back together and never cried once. And that boy became the man determined to make a difference somewhere, somehow. So he became the man who saw himself as one in a long line of soldiers through history. The man who achieved every rank he went for and did three tours of Afghanistan in five years. The man who truly loved his band of Recce Brothers and whose life was defined by being a soldier. That was our son, brother, friend and comrade. We will always be so proud of him."

L/Sgt Dave Greenhalgh, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (154)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Ilkeston, Derbyshire

Died: 13 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Died when his vehicle was hit by an IED

His family: "David was very special, loving and caring and our hero. He inspired us, and brought light into our lives as a family and we loved him dearly. We know that he touched many in the same way. David is remembered each passing day and in our hearts until we meet again."


Cpl John Gregory, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (155)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Catterick, North Yorkshire

Died: 17 August 2002

Location: Kabul

Incident: Cpl Gregory shot dead Sgt Robert Busuttil at a barbecue, then killed himself

His widow Annette: "To my darling husband John, I miss you every day my darling...love you always. Annette xxxxx"

Capt Andrew Griffiths, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (156)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Richmond, North Yorkshire

Died: 05 September 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died in Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, following a blast during an operation

His parents Sue and Mike: "Describing Andrew and the impact his life and death has had on us as a family is almost impossible to do. Our lives were changed forever when we lost him, but that in so many ways he lives on with us all. We have remembered so often the good times and perhaps too often the bad times; when we sat with him in Birmingham and watched him pass away after fighting so hard to live. We often think of his sheer will to live that got him home to us and the fact that we had the chance to sit with him for so many days and to say goodbye. We so want one last chance to talk to him, to hear his voice, to feel his great big arms around our shoulders, as he attempts to crush us in his bear hug. We just want him back in a way that sometimes makes us feel ill and yet in our rational times, we know that we cannot have any of these things – just memories, which seem such little compensation for all that we have lost. There will forever be an Andrew-sized hole in our lives.

"Andrew loved his life and wanted all those he knew and met to experience the same joy he felt in simply being alive. He was always on the search for new activities and adventures, often roping in those less inclined to do so but always with a kind and generous spirit that charmed those he met. He was fiercely loyal to his family and his friends and was beloved in return. He brought so much love and happiness into our lives. We were so fortunate to be his family and will forever cherish our memories. We try to live our lives like he would – challenging it, relishing new opportunities, people and places.

"When he joined the Army he found his natural place, he was a born leader and excelled amongst his Kingsmen and peers, inspiring confidence and never asking anyone to do anything he wouldn't do himself. He was a soldier and an officer; he knew what he was doing, he knew the risks and day after day he took them, in the full knowledge of the consequences. His job on that day was to lead and he was wounded doing just that.

"As one of his best friends described him, he was a bear of a man with a lion’s heart. We will always remember and miss him. He was and always will be one of England’s finest."

SAC Kinikki "Griff" Griffiths, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (157)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 1 Squadron

From: Exmouth and Southampton

Died: 16 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Camp Bastion

Incident: Killed in a road accident while on duty

His father Nik: "His laugh is one of the things we all remember – it was very loud. He loved life and was always laughing, always smiling. He was the big brother of the family and would do anything for anyone. He's not forgotten, he's talked about every day. I'm very proud he was my son.

From his girlfriend Chloe Gunn: “He was an amazing person and could brighten anyone's day with his cheeky smile. Even now, after all this time, he never fails to make me smile. I'd be lying if I said it was easy, but having him by my side makes me want to live life to the full in his memory, like he would want. He was such a determined person and is my hero. I love him now, forever and always.”

Pte James Grigg, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (158)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Hartismere, Suffolk

Died: 16 March 2010

Location: Helmand, north of Musa Qala

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on operation in Taliban territory

Lt Col James Woodham, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment: "Friendly, polite and endlessly helpful, he was a real team player that you would want to have on your team. He was reliable - a man you could trust."

L/Cpl Duane Groom, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (159)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Fiji, Fiji

Died: 14 September 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died after his armoured vehicle hit a roadside bomb

Major Piers Ashfield, Captain of the Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards: "He was the consummate professional; diligent, hardworking and unflinching in the face of any danger."

Rfn Jamie Gunn, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (160)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Monmouth, Monmouthshire

Died: 25 February 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was struck by an IED

His mother Janet: "'Jamie couldn’t wait to leave school. He didn’t want to go to university, he just wanted to get on with things. What he wanted to do was to go into the Army. He was injured during training and we said it was OK for him to back out but he just got through it because he was determined.

"I remember watching his passing out parade and all the soldiers in the sunlight on the parade ground and feeling so proud but thinking, ‘Take any of them but don’t take my boy’. He went out to Afghanistan in September. It was his first tour. His leave was in November and when I drove him back to the airfield I thought, ‘I may never see you again’. When he died, I said to his sister that I always knew inside that this would happen and she said she did too. Once it had happened, that was the worst thing over. Nothing that bad can ever happen again now.

"Because he was out in the desert some distance from Camp Bastion, he couldn’t phone or email but he used to write to me. Those letters are very treasured things because most mums don’t have a lot of letters from their 21-year-old son. They’re a great comfort to me. He used to leave his trainers by the door and they’re still there, although I know he’s not coming back for them."

L/Cpl Gajbahadur Gurung, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (161)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Yorkshire Regiment

From: , Nepal

Died: 27 January 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Shot during an insurgent attack while on foot patrol

His Commanding Officer Lt Col Dan Bradbury: "He died as he lived, at the heart of the action, taking the fight to the enemy and resolute in the face of danger. He was a true Gurkha in body and spirit in everything he did."

Spr Ishwor Gurung, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (162)

Service: Army

Regiment: Queen's Gurkha Engineers

From: Pokhara, Nepal

Died: 13 August 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Shot while improving defences at forward operating base Shahzad

His mother Sunkumari, brother Ramprasad and sister Richa: "Our family is devastated with the news of Ishwor’s death. Ishwor was 14 years old when his father died and he fully supported the family as a young man. He was a very caring and a very bright boy. He followed his father’s footsteps, his father was a soldier in the Indian Army. He loved the Army and was very proud to be a Gurkha. I am proud that my son served in the British Army and that he died doing a job that he loved."

Rfn Suraj Gurung, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (163)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Nepal, Nepal

Died: 02 October 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by a suicide bomber while on foot patrol

His family: "He was a very caring son and loving husband. He followed in his forefathers’ footsteps as both his grandfather and father served with the British in India; and his father-in-law served in the British Army. He loved the Army and was very proud to be a Gurkha, and died doing a job he loved. His family members are very proud of him."


Cpl Alex Guy, 37

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (164)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Anglian Regiment

From: St Neotts, Cambridge

Died: 15 June 2012

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by enemy action during mission to disrupt insurgents

His Commanding Officer Lt Col Michael Aston MC: "A loyal, committed and thoroughly decent man, Cpl Alex Guy was a unique member of the Vikings. His honest, welcoming approach and impressive operational pedigree saw him achieve the ideal balance between good friend, wise mentor and tough commander. In his section he had forged a strong team which he led through the most dangerous of situations with nothing other than courage, selfless commitment and utter professionalism.

"When things got difficult, Cpl Guy was exactly the person you would want by your side; he would quietly revel in the responsibility and never you let down. It is these attributes that have defined his career over the last 19 years and will remain in the memory of his fellow Vikings."

Capt Mark Hale, 42

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (165)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Bournemouth, Dorset

Died: 13 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed alongside Rifleman Daniel Wild while trying to carry a wounded comrade, Lance-Bombardier Matthew Hatton, to safety.

His Commanding Officer Lt Col Rob Thomson: "He was ‘undentable’ and we in 2 Rifles have invented this new word in honourof Mark. Nothing fazed him, however demanding the situation, and his ability toabsorb work, pressure and other people’s worries was genuinely legendary. Thatis what ‘undentable’ now means."

Tpr Brett Hall, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (166)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Tank Regiment

From: Dartmouth, Devon

Died: 16 September 2009

Location: Helmand

Incident: Died in hospital in the UK after being wounded in an explosion in Helmand on 12 September

His mother Sue: “In losing our son Brett, we lost the most kind considerate person anyone could have known he is missed by all of us every day.

His friends Rich and Kylie Cutcliffe: “We had the privilege of meeting Brett at secondary school. So many days we would spend at school, pretending to be soldiers. Every chance we had we would get into the role, and he was always the one with no fear. Climbing the tallest trees, jumping

head-first down the muddiest, steepest slopes. None of us had any doubt that the Army was where his heart lay.

“He was a good friend to us both for years. He had faith in our relationship and was there for us both throughout our entire journey together. We were so happy when he joined the Army.

“Although we worried about him, as this time it wasn't pretend play, his dream had come true. We still remember having regular phone calls from when he was on base. It always seemed to be an unknown number, and the phone call never ended with a goodbye. It always seemed to end when his credit ran out. Because she knew how crazy he could be, Kylie would spend her half of the conversation being a protective friend, obviously to this he would be cheeky in his response.

“He would always be interested, would always listen. He was always happy to put time into his friendships. The other half of the time he spent talking to Rich about his job in the Army. They shared so many common interests in the Armed Forces, and the two of them could have gone on for hours on end. They would always joke about Rich being in a sticky spot with Brett showing up to save the day in his Challenger II.

“The last time we spoke with him, he was so excited that we were getting married, and were expecting our first child. He was sad that he wouldn't be able to make our wedding as he would be on tour. Kylie remembers when we saw him the last time, two weeks before his death, they hugged goodbye and Brett said, ‘look after Chablebear’, which is one of Rich's nicknames.

“His death hit us so hard. We were going to postpone the wedding, but he wanted so badly to be there. We knew he would want us to, and that's what we remember about him a lot. It was never about him, he always prioritised other people, he would love easily and anger slowly. We miss him so badly that it hurts unbearably, missing him every day - especially in September. There are still mornings where we wake up and feel he's still with us.

“We are so proud of him. So proud of his bravery and everything he stood for, both as an individual and for his country. He made such a huge and profound impact on every single person he ever met, a testimony to which is the amount of people who attended his funeral. We think of him every day, and like to think that he checks in on us from time to time. We will see him again one day.”


Pte Douglas Niall Halliday, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (167)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Wallasey, Merseyside

Died: 23 June 2010

Location: Nahr-e Saraj, Gereshk

Incident: Killed in a vehicle accident with three other soldiers

His cousin Helen Fisher: "When he little, he was a happy, mucky, cheeky and absolutely beautiful little boy. And that never changed."

Tpr Joshua Hammond, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (168)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Tank Regiment

From: Plymouth, Devon

Died: 01 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when an IED was detonated under his Viking armoured vehicle

His stepmother Leigh: "Josh was a real comedian, an absolutely fantastic lad, and he literally had time for everybody. He would put everyone else before himself. He was just the tops, the best son, the best brother, we couldn’t be more proud of him. He had been in Afghanistan less than three weeks when he was killed, but he absolutely loved it. He would joke about getting a good sun tan, and in the pictures he sent us he and his friends looked like kids in a playground. But there was a serious side too, and he told us he had seen someone getting blown up. I said to him, ‘Can’t I just come out there and put you in a suitcase and bring you home?’ After he died his friend Lee made a bench in the shape of a tattoo Josh had on his shoulder, which is big enough for 15 people to sit on. We put it on the coastal path at Wembury, near Plymouth, so people can sit there and look out at the sea. Every year on his birthday, on the anniversary of his death and on Remembrance Sunday we go there with his family and friends and light lanterns and set off fireworks in his memory, or have a barbecue. Lee also made a box that we use to store our memories. Whenever the kids make a card or draw pictures for him, we put it in the box. The clothes he bought for his siblings just before he went to Afghanistan are in there too, so they can see them when they’re older. Now some of his siblings want to follow in his footsteps by joining the Army, which is tough. I don’t want my boys to go."

L/Cpl Scott Hardy, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (169)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Chelmsford, Essex

Died: 16 March 2010

Location: Helmand, north of Musa Qala

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on operation in Taliban territory

His family: "Possessing great inner strength and a powerful personality, Scott could be relied upon, even in the worst of situations, to lift his mens’ morale. They loved him - he loved them. Whilst being a highly competitive man, his role as a dearly loved son, brother, uncle and partner, developed his gift for attentiveness towards those around him. His young nephews and nieces agreed that his presence, ‘brightened a room’. His father, brother, sisters and childhood sweetheart, Charlene, feel words fail to express the sorrow only a heartbroken family knows. To lose Scott, is to lose a huge part of life itself. But he will always be with us, making us smile, giving us pride and gratitude. We also wish to remember his Viking comrades with heartfelt sympathy. Rest in Peace Valiant Friend."

L/Cpl Christopher Harkett, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (170)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Welsh Regiment

From: Pontardawe, Swansea Valley

Died: 14 March 2009

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Injured while on foot patrol and died at the scene

His parents Alicia and Gerwyn: '"Chris was our son, brother of Kyle and loving husband of Danielle, though he will always remain that little blue-eyed boy who was always happy, full of fun and continuously seeking adventure. Always the life and inspiration of wherever he went, his beautiful smile and caring nature were so endearing. Chris would always put other people before himself.

"As a family we had many great times together, memories that no one can take from us and we were so proud when he married his Irish rose, Danielle, who he simply adored.

"During his short life, Chris touched the hearts of so many people, which is testament to the person he was. Where there was sadness, he brought fun, where there was fear, he brought a steady hand and we all witnessed his undying love for his beautiful wife and the dedication to his family. Whilst our hearts are full of sorrow, we find peace knowing that Chris died a soldier. A father cannot expect any more of his son, than to lay down his life for his friends.

His brother Kyle: "The determination and 'never give up' attitude Chris showed through his military and sporting achievements have instilled strength in me. I shall now live life with that same determination and strive for success in everything I do, in honour of my best mate."

Farewell Brave Soldier,

Goodbye Dear Husband and Brother,

Goodnight our Son,

Sleep in peace for your duty is done.

Cpl Christopher Harrison, 26

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Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Watford, Hertfordshire

Died: 09 May 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in a blast while on foot patrol

His family: "Chris was not only a huge presence both in stature and personality, but was also a brave and brilliant Royal Marine and highly accomplished mortar controller. He was primarily a caring and loving husband, brother and son, with a constant smile on his face who was immensely popular with friends and comrades. His nickname of ‘H-bomb’, according to his Royal Marine friends, stemmed from his tendency to leave chaos in his wake. He was a born entertainer with a wicked ability to mimic people around him and a wonderful sense of humour. He is remembered for his unique and entertaining dance style, as memorably demonstrated at his wedding reception whilst on R&R leave from Afghanistan in 2008.

"Everyone who knew and loved him reveres his memory and misses him terribly. He lives on in our hearts and minds. We will continue to celebrate his life and memory and raise a port ‘toast’ to him whenever possible. Love you Chris. Becky, ‘Muv’, Dad & Russ xxx"

Cpl John Harrison, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (172)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: East Kilbride, Lanarkshire

Died: 09 September 2009

Location: Kunduz

Incident: Killed in a firefight with the Taliban during the rescue of hostage Stephen Farrell

His father Alan Snr: "I often recall John's feeling of real satisfaction when he completed the Platoon Sergeants' battle course - on which he did really well. Sadly for us all he chose to go to Afghanistan on a nine-month op, rather than go to Catterick as an instructor, which would have been another career choice. I am so proud of him and miss him every day. I miss talking to him. Our lives are not the same."

His mother Elizabeth: "My mind goes back to the spring evening when we all took John to the bus station to the coach down South. We wanted to drive him down to England but he was having none of it. When I saw him enthusiastically board that dark coach I was feeling anxious. At the end of that training and after a hurried passing out parade my boy was going off to Kosovo. I was distraught. We didn’t know what they were going to. He never leaves my mind. I miss him desperately and am immensely proud of him. All the family and friends are."

His twin brother Alan: “Five years on, I can just imagine the amazing things John would have done with his life, had he not been taken from us. John’s death affected many people’s lives. He’s with me forever. I’m so proud to be his brother and miss him every day. John always led the way. He always had an opinion. Sometimes, it was as much like having an older brother as having a twin. I think if John could have taken selection at 14, he probably would have. He just knew that it was the life for him. I admire him for the way he turned his childhood ambition into reality, something not many of us get the chance to do. He was physically imposing, but kind and intelligent."

RM Matthew Harrison, 23

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Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

Died: 13 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin district

Incident: Shot while on foot patrol

His elder brother David: "Matthew was an understated genius who could achieve anything he set his mind to. Matt’s short and action-packed life, conducted in true Harrison spirit, will be an enduring source of inspiration for those who were privileged enough to know him."

RM David Charles Hart, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (174)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: York, Yorkshire

Died: 08 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in explosion while on foot patrol

His parents Dilys and Chris: "David loved his family, his girlfriend and friends, many of whom he had known since early age. Throughout his life, David showed the qualities of the Commando spirit. He had a great personality and was a friend to everyone. His cheerfulness, his sense of humour and, of course, his smile will be sorely missed, but never forgotten. We are immensely proud, as he was, of his achievements."

His sister Sarah: "Dave was the best brother I could ever have wished for. He was caring, funny, had an infamous cheeky grin and would always be there for you. I am so proud to have been his sister, and of his chosen career as a Royal Marines Commando. He truly loved his job and relished the challenges he was facing on a daily basis. Dave, I will miss you so much. You were so brave and I will always remember you as a true hero."

Cpl Jake Hartley, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (175)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Dewsbury, West Yorkshire

Died: 06 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah Durai

Incident: Killed when Warrior armoured vehicle was hit by an IED

His mother Natalie Taylor: "It was just the three of us: me and my two sons, Jake and Ethan. That year it was Jake’s 21st, Ethan’s 13th, and my 40th. The plan was all of us were going to celebrate together when he got back – but Jake was killed four days before his birthday.

"When they were growing up they were very close. They were always out playing on their bikes. Jake was a sporty person and Ethan really looked up to him – even more so once he joined the Army. I would often overhear him telling his friends, ‘my brother is a soldier’.

"When he died it was the biggest shock for everybody, but for Ethan it was like something had been drained out of him. His skin colour was so pale. I was really concerned even though I felt like that as well – we were just in a nightmare. Ethan became a Cadet the same year we lost Jake. He’s 15 now and wants to join the Royal Engineers. He has experienced a different side of war and suffered loss but the desire to do something very similar is overwhelming. He’s a very intelligent boy and has it all planned out, although of late he seems to have changed into more of a man than a boy.

"How I will feel when he goes out is impossible to say. I will be worried and devastated and will probably try to talk him out – but I know he will want to go."


Pte Matthew Haseldin, 21

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Settle, Yorkshire

Died: 03 November 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Received fatal gunshot wound when insurgents attacked his patrol

Matthew's parents, Alan and Jill: "Matthew was a loving son and we are very proud of him. He had only been in the Army for a few months. Friends and family will miss him greatly. Rest in peace.''

His uncle, Barry Thompson: “He was always very competitive. He wanted to be the best at whatever he did and I have no doubt this is how he served his brief time in his job in the British Army.”

His friend Ben Wallbank: “He was always very cheery. Even at 7.30am, Haseldin would be singing along to his iPod on the way to college. People will remember him as a cheeky, funny young lad. Goodbye our brother, we will always love and miss you.”

L/Cpl Jabron Hashmi, 24

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Service: Army

Regiment: Intelligence Corps

From: Birmingham

Died: 01 July 2006

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed when an RPG hit government compound

His family: "Jabron was never shy to show his love for the people he cared for. His affectionate bear hugs, his kisses planted on both cheeks of those he embraced, his generosity that would often leave him with very little to see to his own needs, his deep passion and intellectual curiosity to understand the world he lived in, the faith he upheld, his identity and role in life, are all things we continue to long for as a family despite the numerous cherished memories. The dark fact is there will never be another Jabron for our family in this world. And this is something we have been coming to terms with since July 1, 2006.

"However, anyone who loved Jabron is comforted by his legacy. Someone who was remarkable at befriending strangers, Jabron did truly bridge cultural and religious gaps in dying. His loss became symbolic in the aftermath of 7/7 carnage in Britain, his adopted home.

"The conviction shared by the likes of Jabron, Alan Henning, David Haines, and very many others keeps this diverse world together. Anyone who transcends religious, ethnic, nationalistic and other boundaries to serve his or her duty as a human in upholding humanity is a hero to us. And these heroes remain a beacon of hope for mankind."

L/Bdr Matthew Hatton, 23

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: Haxby, North Yorkshire

Died: 13 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Wounded by one IED blast and Killed by a second while attempting to clear a safe "extraction route" to a helicopter landing site. Two soldiers, Capt Mark Hale and Rifleman Daniel Wild, were killed in a third blast when they came to his aid

His parents Phil and Jill: "Matthew wanted to be a soldier from a very young age, joining the Army was his dream come true. He was a lad who loved the outdoors and had a true spirit for adventure and simply thrived on new challenges and experiences, he lived his life to the full.With a huge heart, he always looked after and supported his family and friends, he had a fun and mischievous personality, which together with his brilliant smile touched everyone who met him. We are so very proud of our son and all he achieved in his short lifetime, he was a very special son, brother, friend and soldier. He was the best and is sadly missed by all of us."

L/Cpl Alex Hawkins, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (179)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: East Dereham, Norfolk

Died: 25 July 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Vehicle caught in IED explosion while returning to base after patrol

His mother Jan: "Alex was an easy-going person and one who was highly regarded by those who knew him. A kind and loving son with a great sense of humour whom we miss every day. He had a great future in the Army, possibly ending with commission. He had so much to look forward to and it was brutally taken away from him. That said, we are and always will be, extremely proud of him and what he achieved in his short but full life."

Pte Robert Hayes, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (180)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Died: 03 January 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

From his mother Diane Baldwin: "Robbie Hayes had a smile that was catching. He could manage to fit the word ‘vigorous’ into any sentence and he was always the first one on the dance floor. Rob loved being a part of Newmarket Rugby Club, boxing for the Army and playing the guitar in his bedroom, when he thought no one was listening. He had a passion for cooking (and eating) and after watching ‘Come Dine with Me’ he would always rate my cooking as 10/10. His loyal friendship and wicked sense of humour meant that Rob was constantly surrounded by people who loved him.

Private Robert Hayes joined the 1st Battalion the Royal Anglian Regiment at the age of 18 and within the Viking’s he found a second family. Rob was deployed to Afghanistan on the 16th of October 2009, serving at Forward Operating Base: Paraang in Nad e-Ali. Robbie was killed by an Improvised Explosive Device on the 3rd of January 2010 after volunteering to go out on an extra patrol. He was only 19 and had been in the Army for just over a year. One of Rob’s Comrades Private Daniel Greenland said “I have never met someone as motivated and brave. He was a great solider and an even better friend”.

Before his deployment Rob told his girlfriend Jemma, “As long as we love each other nothing else matters”. Years after Rob’s death his words are still so true. As to be loved, is to live forever in someone’s heart. You will never know how proud I am of you my darling son. You were a brave soldier but you will always be my baby boy. Tomorrow starts without you. I miss your laugh, I miss your smile but most of all I just miss you. I love you, I love you, I love you, Mum x"

Capt Lisa Head, 29

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

Died: 19 April 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Died in hospital the day after being wounded clearing roadside bombs

Her best friend, Major Natalie Slade: "I met Lisa in 2003 when we attended a pre Royal Military Academy Sandhurst course together. We hit it off immediately and became the best of friends. She was an incredibly likeable person, so fun to be around and always the centre of each party. With her love of red wine, Maltesers and ‘Afro’ hair, she soon became the person that everybody wanted to befriend. Due to her surname being Head, she was soon awarded the nickname of Schward (an army slang word for head) and to this day it is how I still refer to her.

"My fondest memories of her are; clubbing to the song ‘Hey Ya’ by Outkast, her 20p bets to stop smoking at the drop of a hat, and her frank, honest opinions. As a true friend she always told you straight. Lisa was destined for greatness and was taken from us far too early. Although her family have never publically spoken to the press, I would like to say on their behalf that they are incredibly proud of what she achieved and are content that she died doing what she loved doing. She loved the Army and was very proud to be a Bomb Disposal Expert."

Capt Stephen Healey, 29

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Welsh

From: Cardiff

Died: 26 May 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed by an IED while on vehicle patrol

His partner Thea Davies: "Steve is sorely missed by all who knew him. He always wore a big smile and loved living life; always keen for new experiences and challenges. He loved his life in the Army and was truly happy in his career. Steve is always in our thoughts, and all who knew him will have some fond memories that will be cherished forever. He will always be in our hearts and he will never be forgotten. He was truly respected by all who knew him, both in and out of work."

Pte Lewis Hendry, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (183)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Parachute Regiment

(Video) The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan 2001 -- 2014

From: Norwich, Norfolk

Died: 09 February 2011

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali district

Incident: Killed in small arms fire

His family: "Lewis lived life to the full – and more! Words can’t describe how much he will be missed. He was not only a soldier, a son, brother and grandson, but a friend to all. He was proud to be a member of the 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment. Loved by so many and will never be forgotten."

L/Cpl Jonathan Hetherington, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Corps of Signals

From: Port Talbot, Wales

Died: 27 August 2006

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Killed fighting rebels during an assault on his platoon house

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Pte Robert Hetherington, 25

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Scotland, Scotland

Died: 30 April 2013

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed along with two others while travelling in an army vehicle hit by an IED

His friend Lance Corporal Russ MacLean: “I first met Bobby on a TA exercise in the south of France in the summer of 2009. I instantly bonded with him due to his infectious and riotous laugh which made even my most feeble jokes seem to be stadium stand-up comedy. Following the exercise we became firm friends; out with the TA, enjoying many legendary nights out as our ‘bromance’ flourished. Bobby was my best friend. He was the life and soul of the party and one of the kindest and friendliest people I have ever met. He was always at the end of the phone or across the table at a pub if you had problems you needed to talk about.”

Gdsmn Daryl Hickey, 27

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Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Birmingham

Died: 12 July 2007

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Shot while providing cover fire as his platoon assaulted a Taliban position

His mother Bridget: "Daryl’s death has come as a shock to us all. He had only recently written to me saying that he would be home in August - in time for his 28th birthday. I am still coming to terms with it, it is so hard to take in. His passing has left a huge hole that I cannot begin to imagine ever being filled.

"Daryl had wanted to enlist from being a boy and when he was told he must wait three years because of childhood asthma, he never gave up hope. He was always determined and as soon as he could, he enlisted. When I asked him recently if he would ever leave, he told me that he intended to stay in for his pension. He may not have enjoyed every part of the Army, but he was proud to be a Guardsman. It was something he lived and died for.

"Daryl had already been to Iraq and was not worried about going to Afghanistan. He believed that they could make a difference. He never talked about the dangers that he faced, to Daryl it was just his job. We are all so very proud of him. Anyone who knew Daryl loved him and we have been overcome by the many cards and letters received from friends and colleagues, both in the Army and at home. While words cannot begin to express the loss that we feel, they have helped us try and come to terms with Daryl’s passing. They say that everyone has faults, but I couldn’t find one in Daryl.

"I would like to thank everyone for their words of kindness, our family and friends, and Daryl’s many friends in the Army and at home who have been so supportive through this difficult time. I do not intend to spend my life being bitter about Daryl’s passing because that would be a waste of his life. I want him to be remembered as the loyal, loving and generous son that he was to me and the devoted brother he was to his younger sister, Elaine; the son who took his mum to watch his favourite football team, Birmingham; the brother who supported his sister throughout her childhood and the man who always put others before himself. We all miss him so much. We pray for the safe return of Daryl’s comrades in the Grenadier Guards and ask God that no other families have to suffer such an unbearable loss."

L/Cpl Darren Hicks, 29

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Coldstream Guards

From: Mousehole, Cornwall

Died: 11 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Killed in an explosion

His brother Chris Hicks: "Darren had two loves in his life – the Army and his family. At the time of his death, he’d just become a father for the second time and he was still buzzing about that when he went on tour. He loved the idea of getting home from work, putting his pyjamas on and getting an early night, along with his wife, Katie, and if I ever get the opportunity to stick a pair of slippers on at 7 o’clock at night, I have a little chuckle to myself because I know that’s what he would have loved to have been doing. He was a massive family man and we all miss him hugely."

Capt David Hicks, 26

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

Medals / Military Awards: Military Cross

From: Wokingham, Berkshire

Died: 11 August 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed when his patrol base was attacked by small arms fire, RPGs and indirect fire

His CO Lt Marni Olivier: "His calming influence and willingness to make time to listen to our concerns always impressed me. I trusted his judgement and thoughts. He led us extremely well in some very dangerous situations."

L/Cpl James Hill, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (189)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Coldstream Guards

From: Redhill, Surrey

Died: 08 October 2009

Location: Helmand, Camp Bastion

Incident: Killed by an IED on a training range

His family: "James was our only child who lit up our lives from the day he was born with his loving, laughing, head on approach to life.

"As he grew he developed many talents. He was a musician – on the one hand, skilfully playing his guitars through huge amplifiers, on the other, using a gentle touch on his piano; he was a poet, writing down thoughts and feelings until the day he died and he was a soldier – something at which he excelled.

"But his real talent, the wonderful thing that has given us so much pride and comfort in our grief, was not fully revealed until after he died.

"From the day he was killed we began to hear from his friends and colleagues, both in the Army and his civilian life, of the way that he had looked out for, cared for, helped and supported others whenever it was needed. So many of them have come to us, to see how we are, for they say James would have always done the same for them. He would, we found, take on the world for anyone in trouble. In our sadness we have been comforted by the knowledge that James left his mark on the world where it matters most – in peoples’ hearts.

"His death left a gaping hole in so many lives, especially ours. He meant absolutely everything to us and words cannot describe the utter despair that comes with losing him.

"James – son, fiancé, friend, you lived the Regimental motto and were truly ‘Second to None’."

L/Cpl Kieron Hill, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (190)

Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment

From: Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

Died: 28 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Garmsir area

Incident: Killed by an explosion during an operation

His stepfather John Holmes: "He was a really, really nice guy, very funny, he always had a smile on his face. From the age of 13 all he wanted to do was join the Army. He became a Cadet when he was 13 and joined up when he was 16, it was all he wanted to do. He made Lance Corporal within two years and he was aiming to be a Sergeant. He was always a fast mover! It’s been five years since he died and it has been hard for everyone, especially his mother and me. His death has changed our perception of life. We live life as it comes now, because you don’t know what’s round the corner. We used to panic about money but we just don’t now.

"After he died we raised £30,000 to build a war memorial in Clifton with Kieron’s name and those of the others who have died since the First World War. We created a memorial garden around it, and we go there on his birthday, on the anniversary and on Remembrance Sunday. The council also named a bus after him, a No.48, that goes right past our house. On a personal level, I joined 504 Sqn Royal Auxiliary Air Force as a Reservist to take his name further and carry on his good work. I didn’t have any military background before, I am a Royal Mail driver, but now I am a Leading Aircraftman in the Reserves."

Rfn Daniel Holkham, 19

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Isle of Sheppey, Kent

Died: 27 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a suicide car bomber while on foot patrol

His father Rodney: "Daniel was one of those people that becalmed a room as soon as he entered it, and had a smile that made you feel happy even if you had cause not to. He was never flustered or panicked, probably the reason he was 'Vallon Man' searching for IEDs. It was his nature and had such a great outlook on life. We will never stop missing Daniel and life has not been, and will never be, the same again without him."

RM Jonathan Holland, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (192)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Chorley, Lancashire

Died: 21 February 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died after hitting a landmine during a patrol

His brother Michael: "We were close all through our lives because he was just a year and two days older than me. When we were younger we used to fight - I think all brothers do - but once we had left school we were best friends. We both worked for my Dad, then I decided to join the Army and shortly afterwards Jonathan joined up. Part of the reason would have been for the challenge; it was a massive achievement just to actually get into the Marines. He always felt he got one up on me because I was in the Army and he was in the Marines – he used to give me a bit of stick about it. The Marines call the Army lads ‘pongos’ because they say they don’t wash, so that’s what he used to call me.

"We would come home on a Friday after being away all week and get together with our partners and have a big Chinese. My Mum loved us both coming home at weekends whenever we could; we are a close-knit family, which is why it was such a big blow for us. Jon was aware of the danger, without a doubt. He had been in Afghanistan for three months, he came home in January for his R&R for two weeks. He had a fiancée, Hayley, so he spent the majority of time with her. He’d only been back in Afghanistan for a few weeks before it happened.

"I had left the Army and he had actually signed off from the Marines, handed his chip in. By the end of 2007 he would have been due to leave. I think he’d sort of done his bit and had enough – though he enjoyed it because he loved the Marines and he loved what it was all about and loved the guys he worked with as well. You do your first five years and then you just want a bit of normality, you miss the family at home. We were both planning to work for my Dad again, with a long-term goal of being business partners. It was devastating. You really don’t expect it to happen to someone close to you who you love."

RM Richard Hollington, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (193)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Petersfield, Hampshire

Died: 20 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin district

Incident: Died in Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, following a blast while on patrol

His parents Richard and Jenny: "Hey Hun, So much has changed since we last saw you, but I think you’d be proud of us - as we are all so very proud of you. We’ve tried hard to “man up” and be brave, and live our lives like you’d want us to. You’d laugh at some of the things we’ve done and even now I can’t believe the lengths your dad has gone to in raising money in your memory – persuading people it would be a good idea to join him in walking 103 miles non-stop along the South Downs Way for one! It nearly killed him and there was very nearly a divorce or two along the way!! The karaoke at the Cricketers was phenomenal – I’ll never forget it but I’m not sure that many others can remember much about it - the lads were just back from “Ganners” – it was messy!! You’d have loved it.

Some of your bessie mates and ex-girlfriends are married, others have split up. It’s hard to think you would be 27 and perhaps sensible and mature!! Ooops - sorry, that’s really mean – only joking! I know from your letters, phone calls and, of course, the stories we’ve since been told, how much you were enjoying the challenge and life of a Royal Marine in action. Living your dream I guess?

Since you died we’ve heard so many funny stories about the things you got up to – your old tutor, Helen from South Downs has a great supply – that’s got you worried hasn’t it!!?

And, of course, the family dynamics have changed - Dad and I rattle round the house and try to keep busy – Nick and Charlie have flown the nest (it took a while) - Nick’s a home owner and off to Vegas for his hols (he knew you’d approve)!! Chas is training to be a paramedic and loving London student life. Minstrel, your dog, has transferred his affections - to Nick if he’s around, and then Charlie, down the pecking order with me at the bottom of the list of course -walker, feeder and woman! We sold your car … another little bit of you gone.

We miss you hun, we miss the banter, we miss you loafing around the house, taking up so much space, and the mess. Family Christmases and your birthday each Boxing Day are an ordeal to be got through. The girlies help to distract us - you didn’t really know your gorgeous little cousins Lia and Sofie- they’re 7 and 5 now and would have adored you so.

We all send all the love in the world.

xxxxx"

Capt Richard Holloway, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (194)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Engineers

From: County Durham

Died: 23 December 2013

Location: East of Kabul'

Incident: Shot while on operations

His mother Jaquie: "Richard died doing a job he believed in. He knew, and so do we, that he was making a difference, that it was worthwhile, and no one will convince me otherwise. A friend has described him as a 'pig in muck', so happy was he in his chosen career. We are so very proud of his achievements, his absolute commitment to the Armed Forces. We are in awe of his supreme courage, regularly going as he did where we dare not go. In life, Richard gave us the greatest joy; his death has caused us the greatest sorrow and despair. He saw a life full of opportunities and recognised an exciting world just waiting to be explored. Some of his regular activities were clear for all to see when he was at home. I would come in from work to find our dining-room transformed – a sea of mountain bikes, surf boards, paddles, even a canoe, wetsuits, drysuits and all sorts of other associated gear. We love Richard for his sensitivity, the strong principles by which he lived, his wicked sense of humour and dry wit, his ability to inspire others, his love of the simple things in life, his strength of character and humility, his single-mindedness. Above all, we love him for his passion for life and his willingness to share that passion with us, his family, his friends and his brothers-in-arms."

Cpl Harvey Alex Holmes, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (195)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Hyde, Greater Manchester

Died: 02 May 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an explosion while providing protection to a patrol investigating a compound

His sister Elizabeth: "How do we try to sum up our beloved Harvey in a few sentences? Well, he was a larger-than-life character who was committed to his life in the Army and his service to his Queen and Country. Typical of everything Harvey did, he was very committed to every member of our close family, his friends and his Regiment. Harvey was a parishioner at his local church, St Mary’s in Newton, where he chose to lay at rest, and where his mum, sister and the rest of his heartbroken family visit him on a regular basis. As part of his last wishes, Harvey gifted the church a considerable sum of money to enable them to complete the restoration of its magnificent towers.

"Sharing a passion with his father who had passed away in April 2000, he loved all things trains and planes and would spend many an hour indulging and expanding his already in-depth knowledge. So great was his respect for his fellow brothers in arms, he would spend hours listening to the experiences of old soldiers and would regularly donate every spare penny to the Salvation Army collector in his local town of Hyde.

"The loss of Harvey touched many people, those he knew well and those that knew of him as the hero of our small community. His friends and neighbours can tell many a tall tale of Harvey’s exploits, from when he was a toddler to becoming one of the bravest, most courageous men they have ever known. To sum it up, his family hope that Harvey’s death in Afghanistan had some purpose. In reality, it is difficult to accept that there is any significant improvement to the lives of the people who inhabit the troubled lands of Afghanistan."

L/Cpl Dale Hopkins, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (196)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Redditch, Worcestershire

Died: 06 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when his Jackal armoured vehicle was hit by an explosion and small-arms fire, alongside two comrades, Cpl Kevin Mulligan and Pte Kyle Adams

His mother Sue Featherstone: "I believe that Dale would have believed it was worthwhile and I'd like to think that he and the others who died have done some good out there. But, it has been extremely difficult coping with his loss. At its worst, I wanted to join him. Five years on, it's not such a shock to think of him and I live for the others in the family, his sisters and my grandchildren."

Bdr Craig Hopson, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (197)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: Castleford, West Yorkshire

Died: 25 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed by an IED while on vehicle patrol

His family: "Craig was the light in so very many lives. The light has now gone out. His family and many, many friends will love him and miss him forever. Craig the legend. Our Craig has left a hole in our lives that no one else can ever fill. He was loved so much."

Cpl Simon Hornby, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (198)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Liverpool, Merseyside

Died: 19 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His brother Adam Hornby: "Simon was a happy lad - outgoing and always up for a laugh. He loved Liverpool Football Club and he loved to go out with his mates. He was my big brother, there was a year between us, and he always looked out for me. He always wanted to be a soldier, I always remember that. I was in the military too so there was a bit of rivalry. Simon was doing something he loved when he died, but it doesn't make what happened any easier. The last time I spoke to Simon was over the phone. He called me from Afghanistan and he said it was bad over there. The last thing he told me was 'I love you, brother' and I said ‘I love you, bro’ back. He died a week after that phone call.

''He served in Iraq as well - he was awarded a medal because he he found a bomb and saved a lot of people. It's been nearly five years since he died but I don't speak about it. This has been the first time in years. I can't even look at pictures of him, it's the same for all the family. Simon's death has had a devastating effect on everyone. The only thing we have got left is pride."

Cpl Jonathan Horne, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (199)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Walsall, West Midlands

Died: 10 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed in action by an IED

Lt Col Rob Thomson, CO2 Rifles Battlegroup: "He adored life in all its richness. And somehow he always managed to get his way into the Corporals’ Mess football team – no one else thought he was as good as he did. He was wildly and genuinely popular in the Corporals’ Mess and he would dance (badly) to the very end at their fabulous parties. He leaves a gaping hole in his Platoon, his Company and the Battle Group. Our thoughts and prayers are with his adored wife, Rachel, and his children Frankie and Jessica."

C/Sgt Martyn Simon Horton, 34

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (200)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Runcorn, Cheshire

Died: 23 June 2010

Location: Nahr-e Saraj, Gereshk

Incident: Killed in a vehicle accident with three other soldiers

His sister Caroline Horton: "He loved fighting for his friends and family. He was a loving dad, brother and son – he touched everyone he met."

RM Anthony Hotine, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (201)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Torquay, Devon

Died: 02 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on joint patrol with the Afghan National Army

His mother Nikki: "Everyone called him Tino. He was incredibly popular, and nobody ever had a bad word to say about him. There was just an essence to him, a cheekiness. He would wind us up one moment, and make us laugh the next. Tino was lovely as a child and just so funny as a teenager. He was sent home from school for setting off stink bombs and another time because he had won a game of pool and stripped down to his underwear in celebration. He was a wind-up merchant, always up for a laugh. I have a photo of him larking around in a mankini.

"But he never got into trouble. That just wasn’t his way. Some of his friends told me about en evening they had in a nightclub. There were a bunch of rugby lads, causing a scene, trying to get into a fight. But Tino wasn’t having any of it. He started doing silly dances around them to try and calm things down, and by the end of the night they were all drinking together. That was just Tino. He had a smile for everyone, an amazing sense of humour. I’ve never really met someone who made me laugh quite as much as my son did."

Sgt Lee Houltram, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (202)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Royal Marines

From: Cowie, Stirlingshire

Died: 29 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by an explosive booby-trap during a raid on a Taliban bomb factory.

Sgt Houltram was a member of the elite Special Boat Service. No information about his personal life or family was ever released. What is known is that Sgt Houltram was a keen boxer who represented the Forces in the ring. In 2011, the town of Cowie in Stirling held a bout in his honour, awarding the inaugural Lee Andrew Houltram Memorial Shield to a 22-year-old from Bannockburn. One soldier in the SBS said: “Andy was a legend in the unit. A jock with a lot of charm, but also hard as nails. All the young lads used to look up to him as someone they could be like with a lot of hard work.”

Pte John Howard, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (203)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Parachute Regiment

From: New Zealand

Died: 05 December 2010

Location: Helmand, Lakshar Gah district

Incident: Shot during an operation against insurgents

His family: "Jack was immensely proud to be both a Para and a New Zealander. He was absolutely passionate about what he was doing. He was never prepared to accept less than the best and was always striving for the next challenge. His decision to try for the Paras, which he regarded as the foremost Infantry Regiment in the world, reflected this drive and passion. Jack came from a loving family with a long military history. He was the fourth generation of our family to serve in the military. Jack was well-read and believed strongly in what he was doing. He had an understanding of the conflict he was engaged in and prepared his position robustly. However, he never let his profession detract from his innate humanity. Jack died serving alongside some of the great friends he had made in the Army. He comes from a strong and loving family and we miss him dearly."

His friend Jonathan Chilton-Towle: "He was a great mate and part of the glue that bound our group of friends together. He was full of energy and laughs, and always had your back when things were tough. Even at a young age, Jack was interested in all things military. His best subjects at school were history and classics, probably because of all the battles. He was in the Air Training Corps, and I know his family had a strong tradition of military service. It wasn't that surprising when he left University and went to the UK to pursue his dreams by joining the Parachute Regiment. Next thing we knew he was fighting in Afghanistan.

"I was always in awe of the bravery it must have taken for him just to be there. From his stories and the emails, we knew he was involved in combat and that it was dangerous, but it still came as a huge shock when we heard he had been killed. We all took it pretty hard, and even though he has been gone for three years it still sometimes doesn't feel real. Jack may have left this earth far too soon but I believe he managed to squeeze every drop of life out of the 23 years he had. Miss you mate."

Tpr Andrew Howarth, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (204)

Service: Army

Regiment: Queens Royal Lancers

From: Bournemouth, Dorset

Died: 18 September 2010

Location: Helmand, Lakshar Gah district

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on vehicle patrol

His father John: "I was in the Queen’s Royal Lancers, as was Andrew’s uncle and granddad too, so it was in his blood. He signed up to the Signals to start with but a week into his training I got a call saying he’d re-badged.

"He was such a character, one of those people who just lives life for life. A lot of people called him ‘the joker’ because if anybody was down, he’d always try and put a smile on their face. He was a happy-go-lucky chap and his Colonel said he always volunteered to be the first one for anything, like a true soldier. He loved his family and I’ll always remember how he used to go up behind his granddad and ruffle his head, which used to annoy my dad big style.

"But really he had two families, us and the Army. All his best mates in the Regiment made a pact before they went out to Afghanistan that if anything happened to one of them, they would always go and visit the family now and then. On September 18, it was the anniversary of his death and about 10 of the lads came down to go and visit his grave. In a way it helped take my mind off things because it still hurts, despite what anyone says. To me, Andrew was the best son in the world. I want everyone in this country to remember not just him, but all of them and the sacrifices they have made to keep us safe."

His mother Sarah: "He would walk in the room and it would light up. He was always joking and dancing, he loved his music. He liked to help people, even in the street if he saw an old lady, he’d help her across the road with her shopping. Him and his brother followed each other around, looked after each other and got up to all sorts they shouldn’t have! Even now, his brother feels like his right arm is lost without Andrew; they did everything together. He’s left such a big hole, because he was such a big character."

Rfn Aidan Howell, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (205)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Sidcup, Kent

Died: 28 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Kajaki area

Incident: Killed by a roadside bomb

His family: "He may be recognised as a hero now, but to his family and everyone who was lucky enough to know him, he was already a hero. Aidan was a big Leeds United fan and met the players, his heroes, before he left for Afghanistan. He was known as ‘Sunshine Boy’ to his family and he was a loving son, grandson, and a cheeky and cocky brother. He loved his mates both at home and in the Army and he was so proud to be a soldier as we were utterly proud of him."

SAC Scott Hughes, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (206)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF Regiment

From: Y Felinheli, Gwynedd

Died: 07 November 2010

Location: Cyprus

Incident: Hit by a speedboat while swimming in the sea during "decompression activities" on return from Afghanistan. He was due home the next day

His family: "Another year has passed us by / And still we ask the question why / Our beautiful precious Son and Brother / Why couldn`t it have been some other / Four years has passed since we held you near / Some days it feels like you were just here / And others more like a hundred years / Since we saw your smile so bright and clear / We are so desperate to hold you near / We put on a brave face from day to day / But we know this pain and suffering is here to stay. With love today, always and forever from Mum, Dad and your Brother Adam."

Rfn Daniel Hume, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (207)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Berkshire

Died: 09 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Near Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on foot patrol

His father Adrian: "He used to live life for the moment and being in the Army was probably the biggest example of that. He loved his life in the Army and had really found his place. He wouldn't have a bad word said about it. I used to ask him, 'Wouldn't you rather be based back in the UK than out in Afghanistan?' And he would say it's like being in a football team: you don't want to be on the substitutes' bench, you want to be where the action is. When he wanted to do something, he just did it, he never worried about the consequences. His attitude has rubbed off on the whole family. My daughter was planning a visit to the Philippines but was worried about spending her savings. I said, 'Go on, just spend it, you never know how long you've got.'"

Pte Richard Hunt, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (208)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Welsh

From: Abergavenny, Monmouthshire

Died: 15 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala region

Incident: Died in Selly Oak Hospital, Birmingham, following an explosion while on vehicle patrol on 13 August

His mother Hazel: "He was just so full of life - so much energy all the time. He played practical jokes all the time, especially on his poor sister. His friends told me about them afterwards – and I could just imagine them. He once hid in a kitchen cupboard for almost two hours with a bottle of tomato ketchup, just to trick a friend. He was 6ft 2in. All that time, in a tiny kitchen cupboard. His room was chaos, he left a trail of debris everywhere he went, but then he would take hours getting ready to go out. Hours in front of the mirror. I would say, 'you’ve got a short back and sides, what are you trying to do?' Then it would be, 'Mum, can you iron this?' He was just a typical lad, winding everyone up, but then he would surprise you with his thoughtfulness. He was the 200th to die. It’s been five years. Grief is funny. You’re alright – and then suddenly from nowhere, something will knock you for six. We played the Black Eyed Peas at his funeral – that song 'I’ve Got a Feeling'. It surprised people, but he loved that song. If it comes on, I end up in floods of tears, in the oddest places."

Hazel Hunt has set up the foundation Welsh Warrior in Richard's memory, to help Welsh servicemen and women.

Pte Dean Hutchinson, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (209)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: , County Durham

Died: 14 February 2011

Location: Helmand, Camp Bastion

Incident: Killed in a fire, not thought to be a result of enemy action

His mother Elaine: "You'll have to forgive me if I cry – it still gets me – but Dean was always such a happy-go-lucky boy. He always had a smile on his face and was known for being a practical joker. His mood was infectious. I remember once when he was only a small boy, he must have been about four, and we were on a caravan holiday with some other families. I was in the caravan with his baby brother, Liam, and Dean went off to the clubhouse with the others. They were putting on some entertainment for the kids with Rory the Tiger. And they all came back in hysterics because they had asked Dean who his superhero was and he had said his Dad. And they had asked, 'Your Dad? Why!' And Dean had replied: 'Because Dad helps Mam with the washing up and the baby.' He was always saying silly things like that. It still makes me cry thinking about it. After he died, I was told many times about a day when morale was really low in Camp Bastion and everyone was down in the dumps. Then Dean comes back in a right mood and bangs his bag down on his bed and everyone just cracks up. The whole place was in hysterics. He hadn't even said anything. Nobody had a bad word to say about him. I am immensely proud of him. I could not have wished for a better son, or a better brother for Liam."

Pte Alex Isaac, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (210)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Wirral, Merseyside

Died: 23 June 2010

Location: Nahr-e Saraj, Gereshk

Incident: Killed in a vehicle accident with three other soldiers

His father John Isaac: "Alex, you have gone back to the place we all come from, and to where we will all return. All I have left is your spirit in my heart and the memories precious to me."

Pte Damien Jackson, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (211)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: South Shields, Tyne and Wear

Died: 05 July 2006

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Shot in firefight with Taliban

His father Daniel: "I wish everyone to know just how extremely proud I am of my son Damien, of all that he has achieved in his lifetime and of the fact that he died, when duty called, protecting others, in the service of his country. A fine, upstanding South Shields lad, Damien was immensely proud to have achieved his ultimate ambition in becoming a member of the finest regiment in the British Army. He will be missed and fondly remembered by everyone who knew him. My family and I are desolated but we will strive to seek inspiration from the example of his courage."

Gdsmn Jamie Janes, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (212)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Brighton, East Sussex

Died: 05 October 2009

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Died en route to hospital after being wounded by an IED while on foot patrol

His mother Jacqui: "Jamie was a real mummy's boy, being the youngest of seven. He was spoilt rotten. From a very early age he wanted to follow in his brothers' footsteps and join up. He overcame so much with dyslexia and chronic asthma, but he was so determined. When he was 16, he went off to the Foundation College in Harrogate. I was so proud.

"He was so excited about joining the Guards. He was thinking about being stood outside Buckingham Palace with girls coming up to him and asking for their picture taken with him. But, as it turned out, Jamie was a much better soldier in the field.

"He never told war stories but he was so, so proud of the good he was doing in Afghanistan. He would tell us how young girls were now able to go to school without the fear of being raped and how children were now able to play happily in the villages, and it was Jamie and the other lads who had made that possible. He achieved so much in his short life and I am so happy and proud that he lived his life to the full.

"Growing up he just didn't stop smiling, despite his asthma, he never complained and was always cheerful. He was the glue that helped keep our family together. I really believe that Jamie was put on this earth for a reason. The explosion that killed him could have taken a lot more lads and I know Jamie will be looking down saying, 'you may have got me, but you didn't get my mates'. That was him, always thinking of others. He was a real carer.

"I don't think I have fully accepted it and I don't forgive the Taliban, but I am just so grateful that Jamie made a difference to so many innocent lives in Afghanistan. After he died, I received letters from Afghan elders saying how sorry they were and how much he had achieved for them.

"Jamie was the youngest by six years and we used to joke that he was the best mistake that God ever made."

Capt Tom Jennings, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (213)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Special Boat Service

From: Krakow, Poland

Died: 22 December 2011

Location: Kabul

Incident: Died after his vehicle was struck by an IED south of Kabul

His parents: "Tomasz was a loving and very likeable person with massive zest for life; ambitious and determined to do well, not only for himself but for his family; his wife and his two boys who he absolutely adored.

"He was a ‘man of action’, a real doer. He used to say that there is nothing impossible in life, but you must have a desire to achieve it. He loved learning, sport (being a big rugby enthusiast), facing new challenges and travelling. He spent time in Africa, sightseeing and working; he fell in love with the continent, planning to go back there one day with his family for a holiday.

"Tom loved his work: the work environment, his colleagues and simply being a Royal Marine. He was so proud to be part of the work that they were achieving in Afghanistan. Tom had enormous energy, and knowledge that he could have given so much more to life and others.

"We all lost a very precious person and our lives are not the same today because we miss his presence so much; especially as we approach Christmas, the time which should be full of joy and happiness."

His widow Emylie: "What do I miss most? His drive and ambition, his laugh, his confidence... quite simply his presence, as cheesy as that sounds.We met when I was 18, during our first year at university. So much happened in the eight years that we were together – both of us graduated, Tom started his military training, we moved in together, got engaged and married, had two beautiful boys and chose our dog Dushka. We were building our lives together.

"Even now, I am having to figure out who I am without him, as well as try to keep things as normal as I can for our children. Being as sociable and fun-loving as he was, Tom made a lot of great friends; having them by my side has been a huge help over the past few years. I have done a fair bit of fundraising in my husband's memory, mainly to keep myself focused on doing something positive, for some good to come out of it all.

"I raised £2,000 for MOSAIC – a Dorset-based charity which supports bereaved children and their families. To mark what should have been my husband’s 30th birthday, I had a BBQ with friends and family and auctioned off Tom's sporting equipment (diving gear, climbing gear, mountain bike etc).There was also a sponsored 'Toddle for Tom', organised by our youngest son’s childminder, with all the children she cares for walking a mile to raise money for the same charity.

"The main fundraising event though, was Kilimanjaro last year. Tom had climbed the mountain before I met him.My brother and I came up with the idea because we wanted to do something memorable.

"Tomasz did so much in his life and I want to be able to say that I have lived my life as fully and as actively as he did, so that I can teach our boys to follow their dreams in the same way. I organised the trip which involved my brother and 11 other friends and colleagues.Together we raised around £15,000 for the Royal Marines Charitable Trust Fund. I have to stress that it was not all me – I have some amazing friends who took it upon themselves to help out in every way they could. I am not entirely sure of the total raised but I think it may be about £20,000."

Cpl Dean John, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (214)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Port Talbot, South Wales

Died: 15 March 2009

Location: Helmand, Garmsir area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while travelling in a Jackal armoured vehicle

His mother Debbie: "Dean was always smiling. Always. He had a nickname of ‘Demolition Dean’ because he liked taking things apart. He was the only two-year-old who could demolish a metal Tonka truck, even though they’re supposed to be indestructible. He was always a happy-go-lucky little boy, eager to help everybody. He loved anything mechanical and was quite happy to be covered from head to toe in grease and oil.

"He joined the Army at 17. It was heart-wrenching but we were immensely proud. It was Dean’s second tour of Afghanistan. In the last phone call I received a few days before he was killed, he said he was concerned about keeping up morale for the younger lads. He said, ‘I need to protect those boys.’ I just reminded him he was still a young lad himself. He was 25 when he was killed.

"I didn’t think it would happen to him. Knowing he only had a few weeks left before he was due to come back made it even harder. Dean was a real family man and loved his wife and three boys. They have lots of memories of him. The little one was only two when Dean died but the older two keep reminding him about his dad."

L/Cpl James Johnson, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (215)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Chatham, Kent

Died: 28 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when he stepped on landmine

His fiancée Bernadette Broadley: "I met Jimmy through a friend on a night out, and from the moment we met till the moment he was taken, we had an amazing relationship. He was my soulmate. Jimmy was a fun, loving person, who was caring and enjoyed having a good time when he was off-duty. His loves were his XBox, nights out and watching the rugby. He had a daughter, Chloe, who he was very proud of. He was loved by everybody that knew and met him, especially his Mum, Dad, brothers Lawrence and Colin and his two sisters, Maryanne and Jean. Jimmy joined the Army at the age of 19, and served his country for 12 years. He served in Kenya, Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan. He was dedicated to his job in the Army and intended to continue his career and work his way up the ranks. Losing Jimmy was heart-breaking and he will always be missed but never forgotten."

His brother Lawrence: "We have you in our hearts and minds all the time, when things are tough we remember your unfazed face saying ‘Nae Dramas’. It cheers us up and we get over it. You will always be remembered as a loving father, son, brother, uncle and nephew. A massive personality and a true gent was taken away from us on July 28, 2008. You died a hero - rest in peace, Jimmy, and don’t drink the bar dry. Our love will always be with you until we meet again. Your family."

Sgt Lee Johnson, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (216)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Stockton-on-Tees

Died: 08 December 2007

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Killed when his vehicle hit a suspected landmine, which also seriously injured a colleague

His CO Lt Col Simon Downey MBE: "Sgt 'Judo Jonno' Johnson was one of life’s great gems. A huge personality and a supreme soldier, he had a zest for life that took all before him. Energetic, deeply professional, warm and encouraging, he could get the best from anyone by inspiration, by his unfailing humour, by his example and his sheer determination."

2Lt Ralph Johnson, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (217)

Service: Army

Regiment: Household Cavalry Regiment

From: Berkshire, Windsor, k

Died: 01 August 2006

Location: Helmand

Incident: Patrol attacked with RPGs and heavy machine guns

His friend Gregg McLeod: "I met Ralph on a pre-RMAS course in 2004 in Winchester. Within the first week, his South African accent, his humour and his fitness had made him stand out in our group. He was instantly well-liked and soon became my gym partner, my coursework accomplice and my wingman for nights out. Ralph was fun to be around whatever the occasion and he made the course a far more enjoyable experience for all of us.

At RMA Sandhurst in 2004/05, Ralph and I were in different companies and, due to the course tempo, we drifted apart but still caught up in the college bar or in the academy gym. When Ralph told me he had been accepted into the Household Cavalry I was delighted for him: I knew he would do a great job and fit in very well. When he told me he was likely to be off to Afghanistan “within a year” I was rather jealous! You never think anything will happen to you or your friends.

"In August 2006 I received news a in a text from a friend who had been on the same course in Winchester with me and Ralph. She was in Afghanistan and heard the devastating news that Ralph had been killed.

"I broke down and cried all night. Ralph was the first friend I lost in combat and he was one of the nicest guys in the world. I often wonder what he’d be doing now – I know he’d be doing it damn well, whatever it was!

Ralph was a great friend, a dedicated officer and one of life’s wonderful people who are taken too early."

Flt Lt Steven Johnson, 38

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (218)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Collingham, Nottinghamshire

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His colleagues: ''Flt Lt Steve Johnson was a highly intelligent individual and a very capable navigator. His focus was always to ensure that he carried out his duties in the most professional manner possible. Having served on all the Kinloss squadrons, Steve’s professional ability, coupled with his dry sense of humour and positive attitude, was well known to everyone. On his return from operations in the Middle East, he was to be awarded the ultimate accolade of appointment to crew captaincy. Away from work, Steve lived in an idyllic cottage in the Scottish countryside where he was a dedicated father to Victoria and Charlotte and a loving husband to Jan. Steve will be sadly missed by all who knew him.''

Sgt Andrew Jones, 35

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Engineers

From: Newport, South Wales

Died: 18 September 2010

Location: Helmand, Lakshar Gah district

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on vehicle patrol

His widow Joanne: "Andrew was a happy, funny and caring man. He was a loving husband, father and son, and has left a gaping hole in our lives."

L/Cpl Michael Jones, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (220)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Royal Marines

From: Newbald , North Yorkshire

Died: 29 July 2007

Location: Nimruz

Incident: Killed in a gun battle with Taliban during a special mission

His father Alan: "It's too hard, impossible even, to pay tribute in just a few words. I'm finding these days my grief is too much - and I get so upset, it doesn't seem to end. I don't seem to have it in me anymore, I have declined a couple of invites to Buckingham Palace because it is too hard now. One thing that does come to mind is something that Michael liked, and that was the poem about the GreenBeret men. He used to get a soft-spoken Irish fellow from his squadron to recite this poem for him - he liked that poem. When he was badged Special Forces, he was allowed to purchase a watch - you know, a decent watch with the Squadron's badge on the back. He was really proud of that. I have inherited it and it is with me all the time. I can't part with it. He was very proud of it. His last words to me were, 'Don't go all soft on me'. That was the last time I spoke to him, a couple of emails after that but they were the last words. I gave him a hug before he went, it was like hugging a bar of steel - he was so tough."

Sgt Barry Keen, 34

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Corps of Signals

From: Gateshead, County Durham

Died: 27 July 2007

Location: Helmand, Mirmandab

Incident: Killed by a mortar attack on the fourth day of an operation against Taliban

His mother Roslyn: "A light in our lives went out when our son Barry was killed. Words cannot explain how much he is missed, especially his kindness to his friends: we will miss him always."

L/Cpl Tom Keogh, 24

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Paddington, London

Died: 07 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a gunshot during a firefight

His family: "Tom was our eldest son and we all loved and admired him greatly. He loved the Army life and lived to the full. He brought laughter and happiness to our home and to all who knew him. Our family has been left devastated by Tom’s tragic death, but not a day will pass without us remembering the happiness and pride he gave us. We love you Tom."

Pte Christopher Kershaw, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (223)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Bradford, West Yorkshire

Died: 06 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah Durai

Incident: Killed when Warrior armoured vehicle was hit by an IED

His mother Monica: "Ever since he was a boy, Christopher's dream was to join the Army. His uncles had both served and his grandfather and great-grandfather as well. He would play in the garden digging holes in my lawn and when I shouted at him and asked what he was doing he said he was making a trench. When I told him to stop he went and hid in the hedgerows instead. 'He joined the Cadets at Thornbury Barracks in Bradford when he was 14. He was so proud of his uniform that he never let me iron it: he insisted on doing it himself so he could get the creases right. I've still got a photograph of him from then looking so smart with a cheesy grin and his big brown eyes.

"I never wanted him to join the Army. I was worried, obviously, about the dangers, but I knew it was all he wanted to do. He rang me from Dubai on his way out to Afghanistan and told me he loved me. He said: 'I'm living the dream, Mum.'"

Gdsmn Christopher King, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (224)

Service: Army

Regiment: Coldstream Guards

From: Birkenhead, Merseyside

Died: 22 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an IED while protecting a vehicle patrol

His family: "Chris was a tremendous son, he was proud to be a Guardsman and died serving his country doing a job he loved. We are very proud of the fact that Chris was prepared to do his duty, helping to secure a lasting peace and provide stability to the people of Afghanistan."

Pte John King, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (225)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Yorkshire Regiment

From: Darlington, County Durham

Died: 30 December 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by a roadside bomb while on foot patrol

His family: "John was a tremendous son, brother and boyfriend. He was a devoted grandson, a loving family member, and a proud soldier who died doing a job he adored. He will be sadly missed by all his family, friends, and loyal German Shepherd dog Rex."

Rfn Martin Kinggett, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (226)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Dagenham, London

Died: 25 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Shot while on foot patrol

His mother Lisa Inns: "From the moment he could talk, Martin wanted to be a soldier. When he was still a boy, Martin’s favourite film was Kelly’s Heroes. He must have watched it 30 times before he ever got to the end, because they’d always put it on TV late in the evening, and he’d fall asleep watching it. He was brave. They all were, but if they were looking for volunteers, Martin’s hand would always go up. ‘I’ll do that,’ he’d say. He was killed trying to help others. Martin was always joking. He was a classic cheeky chappie, the sort of boy who’d hide behind doors and then jump out to give me a fright. It was only six months before he died that we lost his Nan. He had his time of crying, but after the funeral, he said to me, ‘Nan wouldn’t want us to be sad, to go on crying’. Then he made us all laugh. I remember those words now when I’m thinking about him. It can be hard. His three sisters miss him so much. My youngest, Harley, is only seven. She still has the soldier doll she was given at Martin’s passing out parade. She calls it her 'Mart-Mart doll'. Last November, she was one of the posey-bearers to the Queen when she opened the new SSAFA headquarters in London. She wore Martin’s medals. I was proud and sad all at the same time."


L/Cpl Stephen Kingscott, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Plymouth, Devon

Died: 16 February 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Died after coming under fire while on foot patrol

His Commanding Officer Lt Col Joe Cavanagh, 1 RIFLES: "L/Cpl Steve Kingscott died from wounds sustained in combat, despite the very best efforts of his fellow Riflemen on the spot - who had to fight to extract him - and the outstanding attempts to save his life by medical staff all the way back from battlefield to field hospital. When Steve was hit, he and his OMLT company colleagues, together with their Afghan National Army counterparts, were taking the fight to the enemy yet again in the latest of a series of brave and successful missions. The depth of Steve’s previous experience and the speed with which he picked up new skills made him a model Rifleman, no more so than on operations; that he was also a battalion 1st XI footballer and cricketer gives some idea of the breadth of his talent. We are so sorry for Steve’s parents and family, his beloved girlfriend, and his friends; they will miss him terribly, as we will. He was a splendid representative of the Battalion and The Rifles. We are all very proud to have served alongside him. Once a Rifleman, always a Rifleman. Swift and Bold."

L/Cpl David Kirkness, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (228)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Leeds, West Yorkshire

Died: 15 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed with another British soldier and two Afghan soldiers in a suspected suicide bomb attack while manning a checkpoint in a market place

His mother Maggie: "I’m proud of him and I love the army, but like other mums I am up and down. I can’t move on. I still remember day one, I still remember that knock on the door. I remember it every day. You don’t forget.

It’s coming up to five years now and it just seems like yesterday and then you start thinking is he dead? Is he not undercover somewhere? And he is going to knock on my door some day. You know he isn’t but it gives you that bit of hope that what’s happened is not true.

He learned Pashto, did his snipering, did his lance corporal, which he was absolutely thrilled that he did. They asked if someone would learn the language because it was better if someone in group knew it so he put his hand up. He would learn it off a laptop that he brought home.

He wanted to intermingle with the Afghans when he was out and about; he wanted to know what they were saying. I am not sure whether it was all worth it, but I am sure if you asked him, and if he could, he would do it all again.

His brother Christopher’s in the army now. He’s been in 12 months come January. He is in 3 Rifles now - in David’s batallion - up in Edinburgh. David said when you are going in the army you are going to be with me - in my batallion. And he still kept his word even though David isn’t around anymore.

I don’t go out these days. I haven’t got a life. I just exist since David’s death. It’s so hard. You don’t expect your kids to go before you. I’ve got to keep myself together because I’ve got Christopher. If it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t be here now.

I’ve been trying to get Elizabeth Cross for nearly five years now and nobody wants to know. I’ve written to the Queen and everyone. Mums should get something. I don’t care about dads, but for mums there should be something. I’m the one he would speak to, I am the one who spent money so he had all the decent stuff, I spent thousands. Mums are suffering. No one seems to care. I give birth to that child and I had to make every decision for him.

I’m just glad it’s over and all the lads have come home to their families now. I think it’s disgusting the way they were treated. They have to survive on nothing. People in prison get treated better than these lads did. People seem to think it’s all over. Well it isn’t over for people such as me."

Cpl Jamie Kirkpatrick, 32

From: Edinburgh

Died: 27 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed in a firefight with insurgent forces

His father Ian: "Jamie’s death was a devastating blow to all his family, and it has been, and remains, a long hard journey to try and adjust to life without him. There is no doubt though that coping has been made easier by the support from all his family and his wider circle of friends, both at home and in the Army. As you would expect, in an operational environment such as Helmand, the importance of friendship, loyalty and trust come to the fore, and Jamie was part of a superb team he christened ‘Team Handsome’. He was delighted when David Bailey, the photographer, came to Afghanistan to capture images of the front line for his book, Heroes. It raised a lot of money for charity and also serves as a very important keepsake of Jamie and the Team. David Bailey also donated four signed copies of the team photograph for us. The family also have a book commissioned by his team leader SSgt Scott 'Doc' Docherty, full of stories and photographs of Team Handsome's time in Helmand, which the family and Jamie’s daughter, Holly, will treasure in years to come. Jamie doted on Holly and the fact that he will never have the opportunity to be there when she is growing up, is for all of us the most heart-wrenching aspect to his passing.

"The family have attended many notable events along the way, including the repatriation through now-Royal Wootton Bassett, his funeral in Llanelli, which saw the church full and the congregation spilling out into the surrounding grounds, and the presentation of the Elizabeth Cross to the family. These were all very poignant affairs.

"In an attempt to keep Jamie’s name alive, his very wide circle of Llanelli friends and his Army friends are tireless in their efforts to raise money for good causes such as Help for Heroes, The Carver Barracks Injured Soldiers Fund, The Invicta Foundation, and The Llanelli Memorial Fund, to name but a few."


Pte Jonathan Kitulagoda, 23

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Plymouth, Devon

Died: 28 January 2004

Location: Kabul

Incident: Killed in a suicide bomb attack near military base

His brother Christopher: "Jon’s death still hurts although the acuteness has dulled. We received many letters and stories from his friends and acquaintances and even strangers that were also upset by his passing. It was a shock for us to realise what he meant, and still means, to so many people. It is difficult to sum him up in words, but that is as good a testament to his character as any. We will always remember him as a man who was brave enough to go after what he wanted in life, cared for his family and friends, and had a smile ready for whatever life put in front of him. We miss you."

Sgt Benjamin Knight, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (231)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Bridgwater, Somerset

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His mother Trish: "Ben was full of life, very caring, intelligent and loved squash. He represented Somerset and the South West at squash and helped run training and coaching sessions for youngsters at his local club. He continued to play after he joined the RAF. Ben had wanted to join the RAF from an early age. As a small boy he had wanted to be an astronaut but by the age of about 11 - and after watching the film Top Gun on many occasions - he lowered his expectations slightly and set his mind on joining the RAF and a career in flying. This was his dream job. Ben had an extremely good memory. He became a member of Mensa when he was eight years old and at that time he was one of the youngest to join. As a child he liked to win and he liked to get his own way, which he usually succeeded in. There was a time when he was a teenager and still at school when we gave him over £100 to go to Bristol to buy some new clothes. He spent the whole amount on a new squash racket. His father and I couldn't tell him off, though – we knew how much he loved his squash and always had to have the latest racket. I used to say to him, 'I love you Ben' and he would always reply 'I love you, too, Mother' and give me a big hug if we were together. He is missed terribly by close family, friends and loved ones. Living without him is a constant struggle to us and will be for the rest of our lives."

Rfn Remand Kulung, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (232)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Basaha, Nepal

Died: 12 August 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died from injuries two days after a helicopter hit his look-out post

His Commanding Officer Lt Col Gerald Strickland MBE: "Every one of his close friends has told me how he was always there for them with gentle support and a real commitment to help. When others were tired, he was the one who stayed up; when others were struggling, he was the one who stayed with them. He was never angry, and always there with a joke or a light word. He shared his wonderful human spirit with all whom he met, but above all he was devoted to his wife and family."

L/Cpl Siddhanta Kunwar, 28

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Pokhara, Nepal

Died: 30 October 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Shot by a man wearing an Afghan police uniform

His family: "Siddhanta was the youngest child of our family and was raised with love and care. He was a very loving child and loved by all teachers. Siddhanta was a very active and intelligent student. He showed good leadership qualities and had the quality of making an impression by his thought and intelligence. He was a person of determination. Any programme without him was incomplete, as he was the inspiration. Siddhanta was very interested in watching English movies and listening to the music. As he was growing, he started showing an interest in the British Army. He completed his training and was very happy. During his service,he was a very brave and committed soldier. He inspired us about his duty and responsibility. He worked for good causes and contributed to establishing world peace. His visits [home] bought joy and happiness to our family. We never thought about his untimely demise. It gives much pain to us for a lifetime. We miss him so much as lovable son, caring brother and a very good-hearted person. We are very proud for his sacrifice for the good reason, but you will remain in our heart in every moments of our joy and sorrow."

Pte Thomas Lake, 29

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment

From: Watford, Hertfordshire

Died: 20 November 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed in an explosion while on patrol

His mother Carol: "Tom was a wonderful son and I will miss him more than I can say. He had so many friends who will remember him as a loyal, fun-loving action man, who was always the first to try anything new and usually excelled at it. Tom loved the Army and was so proud to be a soldier; he died doing something he loved and believed in. I will always be proud of my boy."


Rfn Martin Lamb, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (235)

Service: Army

Regiment: Reconnaissance Patrol

From: Gloucester, Gloucestershire

Died: 05 June 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by IED while on foot patrol

His parents Abby and Lloyd and brother Ricky: "Even from a young age we knew Martin wanted to be a soldier,. He regularly used weights to build himself up and air rifles with his brother Ricky.

"Despite this, once he had left school we encouraged him to take on an apprenticeship, which he did, qualifying as a carpenter. He joined up at 19 and served until his death on June 5, 2011. He married the love of his life, Melissa, and provided us with a beautiful granddaughter Rosie, whom we cherish. Martin was a very fit lad and came through the notoriously difficult Marine Commando course. While serving in Iraq he was invited to join the Marines, but he politely declined, saying 'No thanks its soldiering for me'."

Sgt John Langton, 29

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Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Liverpool, Merseyside

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His colleague Flight Lt Ian Tuff: “It’s hard to come to terms with it. Sgt Langton was a good friend. He was the life and soul. He was very professional and loved his job. He will be sadly missed by all the boys in the squadron.”

L/Cpl Richard Larkin, 39

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Service: Army

Regiment: Special Air Service

From: Cookley, Worcestershire

Died: 17 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was caught in an explosion

His family: "L/Cpl Richard Larkin was a beloved husband, father, son and brother whose tragic and untimely death will be deeply mourned by his family, friends and colleagues."

RM Michael Laski, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (238)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Liverpool

Died: 25 February 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Died at Selly Oak Hospital, Birmingham, after coming under fire while on foot patrol

His father Michael: "'Michael got it into his mind that he wanted to be a Royal Marine and there was no stopping him. It's the hardest course in the British Army and he passed with flying colours. He loved being a Marine. He was a joker in the Marines but I think he was more like that with his mates than with us. He was a caring boy, willing to help people out even when he was young. And he was always smiling. From when he was a baby upwards, he always had a smile on his face.

''I lost my wife, Janet, before Michael. She died in August; Michael came home and then went back to Afghanistan in September. He was there five months when he was shot. The doctors in Kandahar said he wouldn't regain consciousness but they flew him back [to Birmingham]. We turned off his life support. He was only shot once and there was no obvious trauma. He just looked like he was lying in bed asleep. I was really grateful for that.

''At his funeral, there were so many people they couldn't fit in the church. The pub across the road opened early so people could sit down. I knew he had a lot of friends but I was taken aback by how many were there. I just remember all the people being outside. It's those things that stick in your mind.Our other son, Jonathan, was born later on in life. He was five when he lost his mother and five-and-a-half when Michael was killed. The last few years have been tough but we talk about his mum and brother all the time. We look through Michael's photos from Afghanistan. Sometimes Jonathan says, 'I want to be a Royal Marine like my brother'. I've always been one to say let them do whatever they want to do in life, but that would be very difficult. We miss Michael so much."

Cpl Damian Lawrence, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (239)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Whitby, North Yorkshire

Died: 17 February 2008

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Killed after stepping on a landmine while on patrol

His mother Alison: "Joining the Army was all Damian ever wanted to do. He wanted a camouflage suit from the age of three. He used to walk around in his uniform at playschool with a backpack full of sticks and stones. He was the sort of boy who was always in A&E, he just wanted to be outside all the time. He joined up the first day he could, when he was 15 and three-quarters, and he loved everything about it. He was a talented marksman and was very, very good at his job. He was mentioned in dispatches. He was 6ft 4 and just built of muscle. He was a fine man and everyone adored him. When he came back from the Army on leave he always used to bounce into the house, never on his own, but with 10 or 15 lads who wanted feeding and a place to sleep. When he died the whole town came to a standstill.

"His daughter Jessica is absolutely gorgeous. She’s very much like him in looks and temperament. We all miss him. He’s just left a very big gap to fill."

Tpr Phillip Lawrence, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: Light Dragoons

From: Birkenhead, Merseyside

Died: 27 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on vehicle patrol

Eight months before Tpr Phillip Lawrence died, he had become a father, with the birth of his daughter, Jessica. His widow Amy: “Jess and I would most like Philto be remembered for being the caring, happy-go-lucky person he was, who was always willing to help anyone any way he could. I think hewould like to be remembered as the life and soul of the party, who was always the first person on the dance floor andwho always made the most of life and never had any regrets.

“Phil never spoke of the risks out in Afghanistan as he always said if you talk like that something will happen. When he came home on his R&R I noticed adifference to when he had first gone out. He didn't talk about what was happening or going on but the night before his flight back out to Afghanistan he said if anything was to happen to him, what he wanted for his funeral and how he wanted Jess to be brought up, and that he wanted us to be proud of him and know how much he loved us.

“My happiest memory of Phil is the moment Jess was born and put into his arms for the first time. It's the one and only time I've ever seen him speechless and not know what to say, with just a massive grin on his face.I talk about Phil as much as Jess wants me to, and tell her how much she is like him, as she is a double of him in her personality and her features. We talk about his favourite things, how much he would be proud of Jess and how much he loves us and is still with us, just not physically. We also choose together something fun to do on Phil’s anniversary every year that Jess thinks we would have been doing together as a family."

Pte Robert Laws, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (241)

Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment

From: Bromsgrove, Worcestershire

Died: 04 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed when the vehicle he was travelling in was hit by an RPG

His mother Wendy: "Everybody smiles when they think of Robbie. He always wanted to be a soldier, even when he was a little boy. In the Army he was nicknamed 'The Morale Machine', because he made everyone laugh and kept everyone going. It was the same at home, he had this cheeky smile and a booming laugh and he was friends with so many people. We are all so proud of him, and to have known him. When he passed out from Catterick he was ‘best shot on light machine gun’ and also ‘best endeavour’, but could only take one prize and chose best shot. It underlines what a promising career it was that was cut short so tragically.

"He was brave, too. One of his Commanding Officers said he had earned a reputation for humour, dependability and courage, and had been in fierce battles with the enemy. He turned 18 in March 2009, arrived in Afghanistan in the May, and was killed two months later. But he had been in fierce battles, saved lives by clearing mines and packed a lot into his time there. He was proud to be a soldier, he was living his dream and you couldn’t have stopped him being a soldier. As his Platoon Commander said, his two passions in life were his family and the Army. He was a big, big personality and the five years since his death have been devastating for the family. Since his funeral we have started raising money for Help for Heroes, which has given us purpose. Rob was compassionate, he always put others before himself, he always looked after other people, and this is our way of doing that on his behalf. The last thing he bought me was a Help for Heroes wristband at the airport when he left, and so far we and his friends have raised £60,000 for the charity in his name. I know he would have approved."

Tpr James Leverett, 20

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Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Dragoon Guards

From: Great Yarmouth, Norfolk

Died: 05 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an IED while on vehicle patrol

Major Denis James, Officer Commanding D (The Green Horse) Squadron, The Viking Group: "No matter how much you annoyed Levy, he was always good to you. He had a love for using his thunderous thighs to body-slam people to the ground. He had an infectious smile, which always cheered me up. He was a kind and caring person who would always help those in trouble. The night before his death he managed to buy a melon on ‘tick’ from the Afghan National Army, and then proceeded to chase me around the tank park trying to smash it over my head. I like to think that he is looking down now laughing at the fact that he never even paid for it! Levy you will be deeply missed. We will make sure that his child knows he was a hero."

Tpr Kieran Collinson, 1st Troop, D (The Green Horse) Squadron, The Viking Group: "Levy was one of life’s characters. He was great company, had a wicked sense of humour, and was totally suited to life in the regiment. He was a man of the highest quality and was to be recommended for promotion to Lance Corporal. He was a giant of an individual, and excelled at rugby in his youth. However, his focus in life was his girlfriend, Tiffany. He was excited at the prospect of the birth of their first child and had planned his R&R around it. He was also close to his mother, Sharon, and loved both of his parents dearly.

"Levy died a soldier, fighting the enemy. He will always be remembered as his photograph shows him: a strong man, smiling and joking, amongst his friends in 1st Troop."

Lt Aaron Lewis, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (243)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: Essex, Essex

Died: 15 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Died in hospital in Kandahar after being fatally wounded by enemy fire

His mother Helen: "There are not enough words to describe Aaron and all that he was and still is to not only us, his family and friends, but to so many others whose lives he touched and to those whose lives have been changed or been affected by his loss and the legacy that lives on in memory of him. Aaron once wrote: 'do things that scare you a little or that you are not sure you can do, just try it. For me, that was living, nothing is impossible and it is a wonderful feeling, having no limits and feeling like nothing is out of reach gives you a superb sense of freedom, so... go for it, learn, experience and enjoy yourself, look after those you love and live it up alongside them, sharing these experiences is unparalleled.' Aaron, the true meaning of an officer and a gentleman, who lived his all-too short life to the full, we will never get over the loss of Aaron, there is a massive void in our family that can never ever be filled. Your very proud but heartbroken family x."

Pte Conrad Lewis, 22

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Service: Army

Regiment: The Parachute Regiment

From: Bournemouth, Dorset

Died: 09 February 2011

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali district

Incident: Killed in small arms fire

His family: "Conrad was an outstanding young man, with a character the depth of which you only truly find out in these sad circumstances. He was a warm-hearted, funny, kind, loving, handsome and clearly a brave young man. It is a cliché to say that everyone loved him, but they did, from people of his own generation to adults of all generations. If you met Conrad you were touched by him and he made you feel good about life. He had a smile that literally could light up a room, change your mood for the day, and a hug that made you feel loved and safe, which he never shied away from giving, regardless of the time, place or audience."

Rfn Sachin Limbu, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (245)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Rajghat, Morang, Nepal

Died: 02 January 2012

Location: Walizi Village

Incident: Died at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, after being struck by an IED in June 2010

His father Mr Dillisher Limbu, a retired Gurkha, who was with him when he died: "My wife and I are immensely proud of our only beloved son who has sacrificed his life for the good of others. Sachin was our only son and we both extend our sincere thanks to all the staff at the New Queen Elizabeth Hospital and Brigade of Gurkhas who have supported us all so closely."


S. Sgt. Brett Linley, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (246)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

Medals / Military Awards: George Medal

From: Birmingham

Died: 17 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed in an explosion while clearing IEDs

His mother Anne: "Brett was the most caring of human beings. He wanted to save lives, not take them. That is why he did the work he did. Helping rather than hurting was what he believed in. He would have gone back to Afghanistan if he had been spared and tried to save more lives. We knew nothing of his work while he was out there. He would only laugh and joke on the phone with us, more interested in what we were doing. His senior officers have since told us that when a new explosive device was unearthed, they went to Brett to gather the forensic evidence to try and trace it back to its maker. He had to use the finest hand tools and drills to do the work, which was obviously very dangerous. But he did it, and they did find the maker of that device. I’m sure that is one of the reasons he was awarded the George Medal. Brett may have been the life and soul of any party, but he could flick a switch when it came to work and be the consummate professional.

"His passing has left such an enormous hole in our lives. We try to celebrate his life all the time rather than live with an awful sadness. But it is not easy. People say that things like this get easier with time. They do not. When you lose a child it works the other way. Every day is worse than the day before. After four years, we have now decided to move home so that there is no direct connection with Brett. Our memories though of a loving, caring son will always be with us."

SAC Graham Livingstone, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (247)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF Regiment

From: Strathclyde

Died: 13 April 2008

Location: Kandahar

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on patrol

His sister Emma-Louise: "We are a very close family and Graham is still very much a big part of our lives. We still talk about him every day. My daughter is four years old and she knows all about her Uncle Graham. It’s important for her to learn. He was very well liked and loved. He was just one of those personalities that made you automatically feel better. He was jokey and funny and happy and was always looking on the brighter side of life. He joined the TA as soon as he could and he loved it, going out training weekends whenever he could. He was very, very committed to it. When he joined the RAF, it was wonderful to see what he achieved in only a short time. He was very confident, there was no situation Graham didn’t feel comfortable in or that he wouldn’t take control of. He is very sadly missed by all his family.”

A Sgt Michael Lockett, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (248)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Monifieth, Angus

Died: 21 September 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed while confirming the discovery of a roadside bomb

His parents Mal and April: "We are immensely proud of Mike - he was everything that we could ever have wanted in a son and was a devoted father to Connor, Chloe and Courtney. He was always positive, and always seemed larger than life. Words simply cannot express what he meant to his close and wider family and his many friends. His passing has left a huge void in all our lives that can never be filled. We can only take solace in the fact that he died doing a job that he was born to do with his ‘boys’ in 2 Mercian Regiment. He would want us all to celebrate his life by remembering the many good times, with a cold beer, broad smile, and looking forward to the future."

CFN Anthony Lombardi, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (249)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire

Died: 04 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah, Babaji area

Incident: Hit by an explosion while driving an escort vehicle as part of a Viking supply convoy

His mother Helen: “I remember we were on holiday in Italy, he was only little. They had some little quad bikes and all the kids were on them, they were going round the circuit really carefully. Not him. He put his head down, revved it up and off he went. All the Italian blokes were running around waving. He was about five at the time - a little monkey. But he was determined. He took after his Dad in that - once he started something, he was determined. Later, the Army Careers people went to his school and he just came home and said, 'I'm joining up'. His Dad went and signed the papers. I thought, 'if he really wants to do it he'll do it when he's 18 anyway.

"He was deployed to Iraq when he was 18. He never really discussed it, he didn't say what he had seen or what he had done. It changed him, I don't know what it was but I found that when he was at home he couldn't sit still. Maybe it was because he was so used to being on the go all the time.”

Shortly before CFN Lombardi's next deployment, this time to Afghanistan, his fiancée Ellie Blakey gave birth to their son, Harvey. “He loved being a dad. Harvey was about six months when Anthony went to Afghanistan. He was due home in the October. He was home in June on R&R. He was tired but he was all right in himself. He didn't discuss what he had done, he brought some photographs home - and it was straight out to the supermarket to get a crate of beer. He enjoyed his time when he came home, meeting up with all his mates.”

But only weeks later he was killed. “To be honest, I used to stand in my kitchen and I would just imagine how the knock on the door would be,” said Mrs Lombardi. “I think deep down I didn't think he was going to come home. When he went to Iraq I was OK but Afghanistan to me seemed different."

Sgt Robert Loughran-Dickson, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (250)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Military Police

From: Deal, Kent

Died: 18 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Shot during a gun battle

His son Rob: "My dad was an amazing man, he was loving and caring and always knew what to say to makes things seem OK. He was dedicated to whatever he focused on, whether that be work, or being a father.

"I honestly don't know if [Afghanistan] was worth the sacrifice that has been made, but I hope it was. I hope there are people who are able sleep feeling slightly safer and that they appreciate what has been given. I'm glad the campaign is ending, as I wouldn't want another person to have to feel the loss of losing someone in war.

"I miss having a Dad, who I can talk to when things aren't great. I miss his smile, and him telling me he is proud of me and that he approves of how my life is. I miss the fact that I can't tell him that I love him, or tell him how my day has been. He was always there for me, regardless of when it was. He took the time to go for walks/hikes with me, and go running, although I probably slowed him down!!! My Dad knew when I was trying to pull the wool over his eyes, and never let me get away with it!!! It's the small things that made him amazing.

"I wish I had been able to tell him that I am gay, I'm pretty sure he knew, but I never told him outright and that's a big regret of mine. I knew he wouldn't have cared, because I'm his son, and his love was unconditional." His wife Jennifer: "We met at the Chinese takeaway where Robert worked in Deal – his home-town. I’d seen him and thought, ‘He looks a bit nice’. So when my friends asked, ‘where can we get a good takeaway? I said ‘I know one! I know one!’.

"When we went in he just passed me his phone number and said, ‘call me’. I didn’t call, though. Eventually he called me and said, ‘I’m still waiting for that phone call’, and I said, 'It’s not very ladylike for a woman to call a bloke, it should be the other way around.' He said, ‘Well I’m calling now’ and that was it, that was the start of our friendship, then it developed into a relationship and then it developed into a marriage.

"We loved doing spur of the moment things. We’d be sitting in the house, and think ‘right...' and then we’d get into the car, with our son Rob, and drive off. We’d just say pick that road, go left or right or straight ahead, and end up wherever... but there was always a burger bar. Rob and his Dad loved burgers. So we always ended up where there was a burger bar.

"Robert was a good man. He always put everybody before himself. Always. I’m not just saying that because he’s a soldier and fought for his country, I’m saying it because I was his wife. He loved the Army, he loved the British flag; he loved everything it stood for. He loved Queen and Country.

"Since he died, it has been horrible. Every time it comes to Remembrance Sunday, it’s like living through it all over again. Every time it comes and you lay a wreath, the grief comes all over again. But, you just have to knuckle down and get on with life.

"You expect them to come home after their shift at work and say, ‘OK, what’s for dinner? If there’s nothing cooked, we’ll have takeaway’. Life has to keep going on – you just wish that person was with you. One of his biggest dreams was to go to Reykjavík in Iceland and I’m going to go in January. I’m going to take a passport picture of my husband and I’m going to leave it in Iceland. I’ll do it for him."

RM Alexander Lucas, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (251)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Edinburgh

Died: 24 November 2008

Location: Helmand, Kajaki area

Incident: Killed while clearing IEDs

His father Adrian: "Alec was a deeply loved son and brother, who was devoted to his fiancee and daughter. He brought so much happiness to all who met him and was described by close friends as a fantastic role model. He will be deeply missed and cherished by all who knew him."

RM Jason Mackie, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (252)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Royal Marines

From: Oxford, Oxfordshire

Died: 14 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when his vehicle struck an IED

His mother Lee remembered when her son completed his Marine training and won his green beret. She said the first thing he did was phone his brother Richard, who is also a Royal Marine and was stationed in Afghanistan at the time. “He and both his brothers were very, very close. I never heard them fight or bicker like other children do. They all got on extremely well. I will always remember when he phoned his brother to tell him that he had passed out and got his green beret. It was a lovely conversation. We all listened in.

"Jason was the most amazing child. He was very much loved and very much part of the family. He was a really happy child growing up - very outdoorsy, very amicable, gregarious. He had the most amazing laugh. Even his friends now say the thing they miss the most is his laugh. It was a very contagious laugh. Losing a child is not something you ever get over. They say that time heals all, but they are wrong. Nothing can heal the loss of a child in a mother’s life. It’s not something you get over, you just learn to live with it."

RM Travis Mackin, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (253)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Plymouth, Devon

Died: 11 January 2009

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Killed in an explosion during a routine patrol

His mother Debbie: "He was a courageous and loving man who was an inspiration to us all and our lives will be a quieter place without his infectious sense of humour and quick wit."

His colleagues: "Travis was the biggest bag of morale the Marine Corps has ever known and that sums him up completely. Travis, we love and miss you dreadfully but are thankful to have had you in our lives."

Gdsmn Jimmy Major, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (254)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Died: 03 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Shin Kalay

Incident: Shot by an Afghan policeman in an unprovoked attack, along with five other British soldiers

His father Adrian: "Jimmy was a comedian and a gentleman who looked after his Mum, loved sport and loved life. We used to have a caravan and he used to love going camping abroad. On one trip to France when he was 15, we took him to the D-Day landing beaches. At the time, he was doing an electrical job in Grimsby but he decided then that he wanted to join the Army and we signed him in at 17. I’m patriotic so I thought it was good that he joined up.”

Since his son's death, Mr Major has set up a cafe at a petrol station in Saltfleet, named Jimmy’s Cafe. He said: “We have a lot of customers come in to the cafe and they see the pictures of him we have on the wall. They ask about him - and when I tell them he was killed in Afghanistan they say ‘Sorry’ and feel embarrassed. But I say ‘it’s OK, we want to keep his memory alive’.”

Capt Carl Manley, 41

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (255)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Special Boat Service

From: Poole, Dorset

Died: 24 September 2012

Location: Bagram Airforce Base

Incident: Natural causes

His widow Sheralee: "Carl and I met when he was at HMS Nelson in Portsmouth and I was working at an insurance company there. His friends asked him to go out to the local nightclub, Martine’s, and my friends also phoned to ask me to go out with them. Neither of us wanted to go: I was at home already and I wanted to stay in and watch a bit of TV. But both of us ended up there.

"I was having a really good evening and one of them, Julie, pointed Carl out to me and said: 'I’ve just seen this guy with the most fantastic smile'. I thought: he seems really nice. Then, as he was dancing with another friend, he was looking at me. So my friend said: 'I know her, would you like to meet her?' We arranged to meet up the next day, and that was that.

"He was a fantastic dad. Our daughter, Lara, has just turned 21, Daniel is 19, and Tom has just turned 17. He wasn’t one of these men who wouldn’t change nappies – he would do everything I did.

"With his job, he was away a lot but he would always take them out when he could. He would take them to the cinema and to the park. When they were a little bit older, the boys got into motorbikes so he’d take them off-road biking. Tom really loved it. They’d go to a farm outside Poole and spend hours there on a MoD range. They’d come back really tired, but they were so enthusiastic about it.

"I’ve got a couple of pictures of him with the kids as babies. There is one of us as a family: I’m next to him, he’s got Tom on his back and he is hugging the two other kids. He’s looking down at the kids and smiling. He was always smiling."

Sgt John Manuel, 38

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (256)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Tyne and Wear, Gateshead

Died: 12 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin, south of

Incident: Killed in an explosion caused by a 13-year-old suspected suicide bomber

Mjr Richard Maltby Royal Marines, Officer Commanding X-Ray Company: "Sgt Manuel was a larger-than-life character who had become part of the backbone of X-Ray Company. A limitless ‘ball of fire’, Sgt Manuel was at the forefront of company life. Hugely popular, he combined a mischievous sense of humour with a dedication and professional manner that was second to none."

WOC2 David Markland, 36

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (257)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Euxton, Lancashire

Died: 08 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by a blast while conducting route clearance operations

His sister Lorra: "A man, a son, a brother, a husband, a father, a friend who oozed enhanced sensitivity and of solid character, with an overwhelming aura of laughter and humour of the infectious kind.

''To say David is missed does not measure the monstrous gap that he has left in our lives, in our hearts and in our minds."

Cpl Loren Marlton-Thomas, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (258)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Engineers

From: Braintree, Essex

Died: 15 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Died in an explosion while searching for roadside bombs

His friend Christopher Kerrigan: "He was the glue that held us together when times were hard. He was whatever you needed him to be. He was a friend and a brother who will be missed forever."

RM David Marsh, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (259)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Died: 30 March 2008

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on patrol

Friends and relatives of David Marsh hold an annual race in memory of him, called the Billy the Kid Dash. The race, around his home village of Thurgoland, south Yorkshire, regularly attracts more than 1,000 participants and has raised thousands of pounds for the Royal Marines' Benevolent Fund. His friend Haley Dixon: "We know how much it means to us as a group of friends when we organise the dash, yet it always overwhelms us to see how much public support we get. There are so many people who knew David or have some relationship with the Royal Marines and the troops out in Afghanistan, but there are just as many who support us because they believe in the cause. It makes me so proud to see everyone come together, and shows us the hard work pays off to create such a great event. It's a true testament to David and his buzz for living life to its full."

L/Cpl Kyle Cleet Marshall, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (260)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Parachute Regiment

From: Newcastle, Tyne and Wear

Died: 14 February 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

His family: "Kyle was a very lively, outgoing, loving and much-loved son. He will be sadly missed by all his family and friends."

Rfn Mark Marshall, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (261)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Exeter, Devon

Died: 14 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a roadside bomb while on foot patrol

L/Cpl Brent Meheux: "Mark, or ‘Marshy’ as he was known to his mates, and I met when we joined the TA together in 2007. Before we left to join 3 Rifles I remember 6 Rifles putting on a welfare morning in Exeter and afterwards Marshy, his mum Lynn, sister Jo, myself and my wife spent a lazy summer afternoon sat in a local pub garden.

"His brother Alex couldn’t make it, but from the chat and the way they were together, you knew how close he was to his family. He was, without a doubt, the apple of his mum’s eye.

"I know how devastated they will be by his death, but I also remember his mum saying that she always knew he’d do this, ever since he was a child he’d always wanted to join up, and how, although she hated the thought of him being away, they were all really proud of him for following his dreams.

"A few months from now, when I’ve left 3 Rifles, I’ll be propping up a bar in Exeter TA Centre and some young recruit is bound to ask me how ‘Marshy’ died. I’ll smile, raise my glass and tell him: ‘He died how he lived, my son, as a Rifleman, swift and bold’."

L/Cpl Nicky Mason, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (262)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Aveley, Essex

Died: 13 September 2008

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Killed by booby-trap device while on routine patrol

His father Dennis: "I’m raising money to keep his name alive and the only way I can do it is through charity. He was the 120th to die and a lot of things changed at the time. Deaths were being publicised more – before that it was all behind closed doors. Nicky always wanted to join the Army. When he was three or four he had a picture of the Paras on his bedroom wall. Later he took up judo, football and boxing – he was an all-rounder. He was very close to his family and really looked after his sisters. He was never unhappy, always positive and always put himself forward for things. In fact, that was probably why he was killed. He’d drive people mad because he’d be getting people out of bed and make them go out and train with him. But he was kind and would cheer people up. If one of the lads was down, after five minutes talking to Nicky, they’d be laughing and joking. He would never talk about being in Afghanistan and I wouldn’t ask him about it. I tried to ignore him being out there and wouldn’t watch the news. When he was back home he would be his old self. He didn’t seem to have changed and would say that where he was based wasn’t dangerous which, of course, wasn’t true. I think once he went back there he would probably turn like a switch.

"Nicky had so much going for him. He was a great soldier and opportunities were being thrown at him. I often think about what he could have achieved. I started to raise money for Nicky to keep his memory alive – to make sure he is never forgotten. The response can be overwhelming sometimes and, now that we’re a registered charity - Lancecorporalnickymasonmemorialfund.co.uk - we can push out and further."

Cpl Thomas Mason, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (263)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Rosyth, Fife

Died: 25 October 2009

Location: Kandahar

Incident: Died in hospital in the UK from injuries from an IED sustained on 15 September.

His sister Kelly. Kelly and her mother Linda have set up a charity in Tom’s memory: The Thomas (Tam) Mason Foundation. Itraises money locally in Fife, Scotland, to help young people get involved in sport – a life-long interest of Tom’s: "We wanted to do something to remember Tom. He was always a really keen sportsman. He started learning spirit combat [a martial art] when he was nine years old, and he ended up teaching it as a teenager. Tom decided I needed a bit more discipline in my life, so he took me along to the classes. I ended up getting my junior black belt, and I still do adult classes. It’s a connection Tom and I had, and it’s a way of staying close to him. It’s helped shape me into the woman I am today.

"Tom and I were always close growing up. We shared the same group of friends and at times I think he must have hated having to drag his wee sister round with him. I think he always wanted to be a soldier. I remember as kids playing war at the old Salvation hall across from our house. He shouted ‘bomb!’ when a brick fell off and hit me off the head (I still have the scars to prove it!).

"I turned 28 recently. Tom was 27 when he died, and I found it very difficult to be older than him. It was an emotional day, and I couldn't celebrate it. Tom was always my older brother. It feels wrong that I’m still here, older than him, and he's gone.

"One of the nice things that has happened since losing Tom is that I gained a new family member. Before Tom went to Afghanistan he got two puppies from my mum, Flash and Prophet.Tom’s widow couldn’t look after Flash, so she gave him to me. He has brought so much joy into my life as he’sa part of Tom. I speak to Tom through Flash every day. He always manages to put a smile on my face no matter how hard the day has been. I smile at the memories I have of Tom, but I cry because I know I can't make any more."

His mother Linda: "Family and friends all go to the cemetery on that day every year to talk to Tom and remember him. In past years, we’ve set off Chinese lanterns in the evening.

"Tom was adorable as a child, a mother’s boy. He told me his friends were all jealous because he’d got the best mum. ‘You’re the prettiest and you make the best chips,’ he told me. ‘What could be better than that?’

"Because of his bright red hair, Tom always got caught doing naughty things because he stood out so much. It was carrot coloured, and as he got older he got very self-conscious about it. He’d say he was a strawberry blond, not a ginger!

"The charity is very important to us. We’ve raised about £8,000, and it’s spent locally in Fife. If kids can’t afford to go to a tournament, for instance, or they need sports equipment, they can apply for a donation. Tom would have been very proud.

"Things move on when somebody dies. It’s always fresh for us, his family, but obviously his ex-colleagues are doing other things now and there’s less about Afghanistan in the papers. Commanding Officers change, life moves on. It’s important for us to remind everyone that there was a man called Tom Mason, he did exist, he was an important person to a lot of people. He’s the first thing I think of when I wake in the morning, and the last thing before I go to sleep. People always ask me on Remembrance Day what I’ll be doing to remember Tom. But I don’t need one day of the year to think of him. I think of him every single day."

Sgt Jonathan Mathews, 35

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (264)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Edinburgh

Died: 28 July 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Shot while on foot patrol

His CO Lt Col Jamie Campbell: "The death of Sgt Jon Mathews came as a great shock to the Battalion. A hugely popular man, he was a fine senior non-commissioned officer who loved his job and cared deeply about those in his charge. An experienced field soldier and a simply superb trainer, he rose quickly up the ranks.

"He always led from the front, inspiring others to follow and with his operational background and determination to make a difference, was ideally suited to the demands of Helmand province. An absolute professional, he was courageous, reliable to the core and unwaveringly loyal to all.

"But his love of soldiering could never be matched by his absolute devotion to his wife Shona and his children, William and Meghan. No matter where he found himself he always found time to keep in touch with them. He will be sorely missed by all."

Rfn Liam Maughan, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (265)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Doncaster, South Yorkshire

Died: 06 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Shot while protecting his platoon as they engaged with Afghans

His family: "What best describes Liam? He was handsome, cheeky, funny, stubborn, irresponsible, tall, infuriating (at times), social, gregarious, popular, carefree, generous, kind hearted - and as we now know immensely brave for an 18 year old.

"At over 6ft tall, dark skin, blonde hair and green eyes, he was never short of female friends. Indeed it is fair to say that amongst his peer group he was a 'stand out' as much for his careless antics as for his good lucks.

"He would always supply the entertainment, for him the crazier the better. This would inevitably result in minor incidents, from falling out of a tree trying to protect a nest from a cat, jumping into a swimming pool before he could swim, or getting stuck in a sand quarry and requiring a JCB to pull him out of the mud.

"I remember one occasion while he was on leave he decided he would ‘bull’ my work boots. That is to apply the mirror finish to them that service people are known for. Unfortunately, his enthusiasm didn’t extend to the second boot. So up until the point I retired them, I had one outstandingly polished boot and one dull, sad-looking one. Despite my best efforts I could not achieve in two years the finish he achieved in 20 minutes! He enjoyed soldiering, though. About Afghanistan, he would tell us not to worry: 'It’s not like you see on the news, sometimes it's boring.' He even claimed to have read a book. I nearly believed him - nearly as much as I did when he said: 'Don’t worry the Taliban can’t shoot. They are unprofessional and not disciplined.'

"He also said of his time out there that he had 'some of the best laughs ever'. Liam wasn’t a one to ponder the bigger questions, of that I am pleased. He took everything in his stride and nothing fazed him."

Sjt Paul McAleese, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (266)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Hereford, Herefordshire

Died: 20 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on routine foot patrol

His widow Joanne: “The morning he headed off to Afghanistan he tried to slip out of the house without waking me, but he couldn’t work out the ignition on his hire car. So he had to come back in for help. I was standing out there in my pyjamas at six in the morning, trying to help him start the car. His last words to me were, 'look after Charley,' our son.

"Mac was a soldier when we first got together and he was a soldier when I married him, so I had always known of the dangers of his work. As an Army wife you see so much on the news and read in the papers about soldiers dying, but live with the hope your husband is going to come home. For me, it wasn’t to be.”

On the day before the second anniversary of his death, his father, John, died of a heart attack. John had been one of the SAS contingent who liberated the Iranian embassy in London in 1980. “He’d never had heart problems before, so you have to think it was a broken heart. My Mac’s ambition had always been to follow his dad into the regiment. But that wasn’t the biggest thing in his life. He said to me that me and Charley were the most important. I have tried every day since he died to tell Charley [who is now five and at school] what a great man his father was."

L/Sgt Dale Alanzo McCallum, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (267)

Service: Army

Regiment: Scots Guards

From: Hanover, Jamaica

Died: 01 August 2010

Location: Helmand, Lakshar Gah district

Incident: Shot during a security operation

Lt Col LCP Jopp MC: "LSgt McCallum was a giant amongst men. It was not just his physique that made him such an imposing character – his fellow soldiers used to remark that ‘even his muscles have muscles’ – but his enthusiastic, energetic and indefatigable zest for life that made him such a well-loved soldier. He wanted to be the best. But not because he wanted to be better than everyone else, so that he made them feel inadequate – that wasn’t him at all. He was just a driven, quiet professional. He oozed competence and inspired confidence.

"He was also cool. Very cool, indeed. His passing meant that he will never fulfil his personal crusade and life’s work – teaching white men to dance! He was a patient and diligent instructor, and a whole generation of Scots Guardsmen have benefitted from his tuition. He would often have to be reminded that an appropriate background activity on a range was something like first aid, not ‘having a dance off’.

LSgt McCallum died protecting his men. Checkpoint Said Abdul in the Lashkar Gar area of Helmand Province had come under considerable insurgent pressure. When a sniper attacked the checkpoint with consistent and accurate fire, LSgt McCallum did what he had done many times before. He grabbed his rifle, headed for the high ground in order to locate and neutralise the enemy threat. He was killed by an enemy bullet while doing so."


Cpl Brent McCarthy, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (268)

Service: RAF

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Telford, Shropshire

Died: 12 May 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah district

Incident: Shot by members of the Afghan Police Force while providing security for a meeting with local officials

His father John, on behalf of the McCarthy family: "Brent literally skidded into the world at 11.33am on Wednesday, February 18, 1987. If it wasn’t for nature’s safety rope and a quick-thinking nurse, he could have easily ended up on the floor. Sarah and myself were so happy to now have a complete family with Jodie and Brent, one girl and one boy. Brent was a happy-go-lucky child who always loved to be outside playing with his friends. He also had a cheeky side to him which showed in lots of ways. I remember once when he was around 18 months old, he decided to taunt his mother by taking an expensive Wedgwood sweet dish and gesturing as though he was going to throw it. Before Sarah could get there, he launched it at great speed. However, typical of Brent, he took great care to make sure it landed on the settee. He then ran off laughing.

"Brent always enjoyed sport and took up roller hockey, getting into a team in Telford. This is where l first witnessed his aggressive side. He would never back down, regardless how big the opposition was. However, this was always done in a controlled way as Brent was a kind and caring man who would not harm a fly. He was a loving son who cared deeply for his family. He loved the family gatherings and enjoyed meeting up with his cousins and disappearing to nightclubs when the oldies were ready for bed. Of all the Dads in the world Brent could have chosen, he chose me, and for that I will forever be proud and grateful. A devoted son, brother, uncle and nephew, who is missed every minute of every day. God bless and sleep tight."

Pte Aaron McClure, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (269)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Ipswich, Suffolk

Died: 23 August 2007

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: One of three killed when US F15 providing air support to ground troops dropped bomb

His Platoon Sgt ‘Woody’ Woodrow: "Pte ‘Troy’ McClure was an amazingly robust soldier with potential beyond his young years. He was always helpful and dependable in the thick of things. We will miss him deeply and he will never be forgotten."

Rgr Aaron McCormick, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (270)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Irish Regiment

From: County Londonderry

Died: 14 November 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

His mother Margaret McCormick: "Aaron was very intelligent; he got four A-levels and nine GCSEs, and he always had to be constantly doing something to keep his mind busy. He played the clarinet and he was moving onto the saxophone. He wanted to join the RAF from being about two years old. He loved aeroplanes. But the Royal Irish was in his blood. They originally wanted him to go to Sandhurst, but he said he wanted to start at the bottom. He'd say how could he give anyone else orders, when he didn't know what it was like to take them?

"He was a Star Trek fan, he grew up being mad about everything to do with space. He was an adventurer and a practical joker; he was the joker of the family and had us all in stitches. If you were feeling down, he would always think of something to cheer you up. You never knew what was going to happen or where he would be hiding – wherever you'd least expect him. He would have loved the ice bucket challenge – the whole house would have been soaked. He was full of life, loved a good laugh and a good carry on. There was a serious side of him as well. All his friends say he was the one they'd go to if they ever had a problem, and that he was caring and wise beyond his years. He phoned home as much as he possibly could, but never let on he was scared. He kept all that from us so we weren't upset or worried. It's very hard. There is just a hole and it will never be filled, never. We still talk about him daily. If we're talking amongst the family, it's as if he's still here. Because he is, he'll always be with us. We're so proud of him. He was brave, he really was."

L/Cpl Luke McCulloch, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (271)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Irish Regiment

From: Gillingham, Kent

Died: 06 September 2006

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in a Taliban attack on patrol

His mother Elaine McCulloch-Brandt: "Luke always wanted to make you laugh. One time, we were sunbathing out in the yard and without notice he came and threw buckets of water over us. Or, when he was little, he’d come into my room in the middle of the night and pull my blankets off and run away laughing.

''If things were hard or you were sad, he’d say, 'Mum, life’s too short. Let it go over your head.' Those are things I should be telling him, I’d think, not the other way around.

''I’ve heard so many stories from Afghanistan about how he’d try and make everybody laugh. When they were packing up to go into the war zone he was the only one that calmed them down because of his attitude. I’m happy he was like that but not surprised – it’s who he was.

''If he was anxious, we’d talk it out. But I don’t think he showed many people that side. He did once tell me he was scared in Afghanistan. He said, 'Mum, it’s not a nice place. It’s not nice what you see out there.' But he said he was doing it to make sure that violence doesn’t come here to us.

''One time, they were out on patrol and came across a village with a lot of kids. The kids were thirsty, and even though it was three hours to get back to camp, Luke insisted on giving away most of the water. He was like that, he’d give the shirt off his back to someone else.

''He wasn’t materialistic at all. One year when we were living in South Africa we were robbed just before Christmas. He took his presents, wrapped them up and told me to give them to his brother.

''Luke wasn’t the type of young man who didn’t like his mother to kiss him in front of friends. I’m 5ft 4 and he’s more than 6ft but when we were at a wedding in Scotland and he bent down to let me kiss him. Something I do with both my boys is kiss them on their eyes, on their foreheads, on their cheeks and lips, and give them a hug. One friend said, ‘Why do you let your mum do that?' and he turned around and said, 'Because I love her.”

Capt John McDermid, 43

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (272)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Glasgow

Died: 14 November 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: While leading a patrol, his vehicle was hit by an IED, killing Capt McDermid and wounding one other

His family: "John’s family and friends are devastated by this loss. John was such an important part of their lives and his death has left a void that can never be filled. Every one who knew John knew how loving, dedicated, strong, hilarious and truly wonderful he was. Although very much a family man, John’s sense of duty and responsibility were never overlooked."

Pte Sean McDonald, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (273)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Edinburgh

Died: 07 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a blast while on foot patrol

His mother Jacqueline: "My son was so proud to be a soldier. He will be desperately missed by all family and friends. This tragedy has left a hole in our lives and a hole in our heart. Sleep well Baby Boy."

A Sjt Stuart McGrath, 28

(Video) This Is What Winning Looks Like (Full Length)

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (274)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire

Died: 16 September 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Died in an explosion while on foot patrol

His friend Sandy Ablott: "Stuart, I can't start to explain what a void your passing has left on this world, I remember the fun-loving teen who was like a big brother to my three, and many youngsters in the local community, Air Cadet nights started at our house with a cuppa and a bit of banter, then off you, Peter and Tom would go collecting the little 'uns en route, seeing them safely there and back, then returning for a bit of supper and a laugh before your train was due. I am honoured to have seen the man you became, with time always for your family, comrades and never forgetting your old friends. I am angered and deeply saddened by this tragedy and loss to your family and all who knew you."

L/Cpl Stephen McKee, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (275)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Irish Regiment

From: Banbridge, County Down

Died: 09 March 2011

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali district

Incident: Killed when his vehicle hit an IED

His brother Robert: "Less than a year before than his death, whilst Stephen was attending his Section Commanders’ course at IBS Brecon, he travelled home on a weekend off to Ternhill to visit his heavily pregnant wife. Carley, by chance, gave birth to their baby daughter Keeley that weekend. Both were ecstatic. However, their joy was short-lived as disaster struck when their baby daughter died tragically two days later. Both Stephen and Carley were left heartbroken. Stephen returned to complete his course later on in the year. In late 2010, Stephen was offered the chance of a posting in the UK rather than joining the remainder of 1RIR halfway through another tour of Afghanistan. His response: 'I did not spend months doing my Section Commanders’ course to take the easy option.' I think that sums him up. On March 9, just days before the first anniversary of his daughter’s death, Stephen lost his life. In the days leading up to his death, he had the opportunity, by chance, to phone all of the family at home. He was laid to rest beside his daughter in his home town Banbridge. I know that his wife Carley, and indeed all of the family, drew great comfort from the fact that he is reunited with his little girl.

"Growing up, Stephen did not have much interest in the academic side of life, but excelled at anything sporty. After leaving school, he worked at various jobs before joining Royal Irish Regiment home service (3RIR) on a part-time basis. It was here that he caught the bug for the military life. When RIR Home Service was disbanded, he and younger brother Michael transferred to 1st Battalion Royal Irish, then based at Inverness. He was shortly after deployed on his first tour of Afghanistan on Op Herrick 8. Stephen enjoyed the Army life and was definitely in for the duration. And it was through the Army that he met Carley. Throughout his life he had more than his fair share of misfortune, between injuries and accidents. Despite this, Stephen always had a happy-go-lucky attitude, and I can honestly say was the most easy-going, honest, funny person I have ever met. In 27 years I never witnessed him having a disagreement with anyone."

RM Robert McKibben, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (276)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 3 Commando Brigade, UK Landing Force Command Support Group

From: Country Mayo, Irish republic

Died: 12 November 2008

Location: Helmand, Garmsir area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on joint patrol with Afghan forces

His family: "It is hard to summarise someone who meant so much to us all without resorting to hackneyed phrases or clichés. Rob was a wonderful son, brother, cousin, uncle and friend the type of person you just liked to be around. He had a brilliant sense of humour and could always see the funny side of a situation although not at the expense of others. He also had a serious side and he hated to see injustice or unfairness to others, especially to those smaller than him and, at 6ft 6, that was most people.

"Rob was an intelligent man who chose the Marines after he completed a degree and travelled, making sure that it was what he really wanted to do and he loved it - relishing the training and the challenges and never giving up - it wasn't in his nature. Although Rob never got to experience the joy of fatherhood, he was a wonderful and greatly missed uncle and amazing at throwing kids safely into the air to their delight and the gasps of the waiting parents!

"Rob has left a huge hole in our lives and even after six years, the pain of loss makes it seem only yesterday. We keep waiting for his memory to fade - just a little - but it doesn't and he will always be a major part of our family and a much missed friend to many."

L/Cpl Jonathan McKinlay, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (277)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Darlington, County Durham

Died: 14 September 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed by small arms fire while on patrol with Afghan police

His widow Lisa: "He was very thrill-seeking and now I've become a bit of a thrill-seeker myself. Doing charity work is what's got me through the past three years. It's kept me busy and focused. It's all about Jon. It keeps him alive to me. Life will never be the same. I'm a completely different person now. It's made me more adventurous. I was very career-focused, whereas now I'm more about living for the moment because that's all we've got left. My priority is living the life Jon would’ve wanted us to live.

"Whatever I can do to ensure his memory is kept alive, I'm happy to do. I remember our first meeting: he came to my house with flowers and a bottle of wine. We talked non-stop for four hours and we had such a strong feeling, a connection, that that was how it was meant to be: just me and him. He had rubbish banter, no doubt about it. He was funny, an amazing cook and such a character. Everything about him was just fantastic."

Pte Robert McLaren, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (278)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment

From: Isle of Mull, Argyll and Bute

Died: 11 June 2009

Location: Kandahar

Incident: Killed while on operation by an IED

His parents Alasdair and Linda: "We are very proud of Robert; he died doing a job he loved and we will cherish fond memories of Robert for ever."

Pte McLaren was killed just six weeks after finishing his training, and two weeks after his first patrol. Officer Commanding 2 Platoon, Lt Robert Colquhoun: "No soldier has impressed me so much in such a short amount of time. Always pushing himself forward to get a new angle to defeat the enemy and support his friends, he acquitted himself throughout his short time with 2 Platoon with bravery and skill.

"His final action exemplified this: with his section pinned down by accurate rifle fire from two sides and the target of indirect rocket attacks, his instinct was to thrust forward once again to improve his position and relieve pressure on his comrades.

"Killed taking the fight to the enemy, he will ever be remembered with a smile on his face, ready and willing to do what was necessary to get the job done. Committed, fearless and courageous, his measured steadfastness set him apart from his peers. Had his life not been cruelly cut short Robert was destined for great things and all who knew him will miss him greatly. We are the richer for having known him."

R. Highrs. Scott McLaren, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (279)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Edinburgh

Died: 04 July 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Captured and killed by Taliban after going missing from his post at night

His family: "We were extremely proud of Scott. He loved the Army and despite his short time in 4 SCOTS had made many friends. Scott was a beloved son to James and Ann and brother to Kirsty, James and Ross. His family and friends, Grandmother Evelyn, Uncle Graham, Aunty Heather and close friend Michael will miss him dreadfully. We will always be thinking of him."


L/Bdr Liam McLaughlin, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (280)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: , Lancashire

Died: 03 March 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by RPG during a Nato-led ISAF operation

The principal at his former school Liz Nicholls: "He was a popular and committed pupil who excelled on the sports field, particularly in rugby, football and cricket. We are very proud of his willingness to serve this country in one of the most dangerous areas of the world and we shall remember him with great affection."

His CO Lt Col Neil Wilson: "'Paddy' was a real character, that rare combination of natural verve and determined professionalism that is an absolute pleasure to be around. He was an extremely popular young soldier, and undoubtedly had a bright future ahead of him. He leaves a void that will be felt by the entire regiment."

RM Nigel Dean Mead, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (281)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Carmarthen, Camarthenshire

Died: 15 May 2011

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali district

Incident: Killed by an IED while searching a compound

His mother Amanda: "You had the most wonderful and warming personality. Although you turned out to be a proud and heroic Royal Marine, you will always be my little blue-eyed boy. The consequences of never hearing you say the words, 'I love you Mam', or never again having one of your loving and comforting 'cwches' and never hearing your cheeky laugh leaves me with a broken heart for the rest of my life."

Spr Guy Mellors, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (282)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Coventry, West Midlands

Died: 15 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed while clearing roadside bombs

His partner Sonia Fleming: "Michael was my soulmate, the best loving partner and Dad anyone could have asked for. He lived to be a hero and died a hero. We are all extremely proud of him and always will be."

Lt Paul Mervis, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (283)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: London, London

Died: 12 June 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed in an explosion while on foot patrol

His family: "Paul was a wonderful, loving son, brother and friend - generous and thoughtful, with an infectious sense of fun. Paul was killed doing the job he chose and loved. He was passionately committed to his men - far beyond mere duty. He had read widely about Afghanistan, and went with a genuine desire to help bring enough stability there to enable reconstruction to follow."

CO2 Rifles Battle Group, Lt Col Rob Thomson: "Lt Paul Mervis was utterly irrepressible. There was no more committed officer in The Rifles and the Riflemen adored being under his command. He had taken the fight to the enemy at every turn and it had not been without a cost - Rifleman Thatcher was in his platoon and his beloved 10 Platoon had already had two other Riflemen wounded in action, including his Platoon Sergeant.

"It was a cost which hurt him to the core but it did not deter him. He adored platoon command and the richness of its challenge and there was nothing he would not do for one of his Riflemen. In the mess, most of us could not keep up with him. He was full of enquiry and was a deep thinker - about soldiering and about life. He read more about Afghanistan than anyone as we prepared for this tour and his empathy for the people of this fascinating country was exemplary. He had been due to move on soon to train recruit Riflemen back in Catterick which he would have done brilliantly but it is a measure of the man and his passion for those he commanded that, since our arrival here, he had, on every occasion we met, asked if he could stay on."

Sgt Stuart Millar, 40

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (284)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment

From: Motherwell, Lanarkshire

Died: 31 August 2009

Location: Helmand, north of Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed in a blast, thought to have been caused by an RPG, while on foot patrol

His father Charles Angus Findlayson Millar: "Stuart was always trying to get the best for his lads. The company called him 'Grandad', because he was about the oldest among them. The senior officers would sometimes wind his neck in, as the Army phrase goes, when he was pushing a wee bit too hard over things.

"One day one of the lads had a wee bit too much sunburn, or dehydration rather. It was deemed self-inflicted and he was punished. Stuart went to the staff involved and made an official complaint. He was angry at the lad for getting into that situation, but for some pen-pusher in an air-conditioned office to make such a statement - he really took that to heart.

"Another time he organised a Highland Games, competing against the Americans in Camp Bastion, with all the usual things like trying to toss a caber. The boys raised a few thousand dollars that way.

"Just before he died, he came home for the fortnight, for his birthday. He took me for a drive around the countryside at Nigg, and he just said, ‘See what we’ve got here? This is it, this is the life that everybody should have. Who would want to lose that?’ He wanted to do his bit to make the world a better place. He felt that the thing they were doing was right. But I think he was more or less saying, without making a statement as such, that this could happen to him."

Flt Lt Leigh Mitchelmore, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (285)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Bournemouth, Dorset

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His widow Claire: ''He was an exceptional person, wonderful husband and a daddy in a million.''

L/Cpl Nigel Moffett, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (286)

Service: Army

Regiment: Light Dragoons

From: Belfast

Died: 30 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Died in an explosion while on an operation

His father Nigel: "Dear Son, I wanted to update you. Niall got his Visa after the longest wait in history so he is in America now and getting settled into married life with his US wife Kristin. Interesting twist on the war years! Rachael is due early next year with her second and Miriam is almost there with her first. A sum total of eight grandchildren thus far, still short of double figures though. Hannah graduated and wandered around a bit but is back in the way and has a great job. Owen is still Owen! and a Dad. Paul is happy at work on his laptop, which accompanies him at all times and sports a ginger beard. Kevin left our wee home and has gone to Wales as opposed to Hell! He is enjoying life as a student. Carolyn is working in Glasgow and the four wee ones are getting big. Michelle runs Young Women programme in church and is still at home. Carol is still riding her bike and tinkling the ivories. Beethoven is her current favourite and therefore mine also! Me, I have the health of a condemned building that refuses to fall down. As to the troops, they are coming home, albeit temporarily. There are other pots boiling elsewhere. Bless 'em all! The Regiments remain, the flag still flies and peace is still bought with a price. 'Tis a fine thing to remember the fallen of the Frist World War in this centenary year. Memory is indeed the treasury and guardian of all things. You and the rest live there, forever marching! As to the future, I look forward to that meeting, beyond the river, where me, thee, Elaine and we, all get togetherand silently agree: God knew best. Dad."

Pte Jonathan Monk, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (287)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment

From: London

Died: 09 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed in an explosion while clearing IEDs

His mother Diana: "Jonathan wanted to be a soldier from a very young age. Never wavered. My uncle, Norman Painting, who played Phil Archer in The Archers for many years, was invited on This Is Your Life when Jonathan was four. It was going to be a long day’s filming, from late morning to the early hours of the following day, so we said to Jonathan, ‘If you behave really well, what would you like as a reward?’ And he thought for a bit and he said, ‘A soldier’s uniform’. He was impeccably behaved all day and we bought him a uniform from the Army surplus store. He was in there almost every week after that, throughout his childhood, saving up for things. There was never any doubt as to what he was going to do. A week before he went back to Afghanistan, I asked him how he felt. I thought of it as a very scary place, and he said he couldn’t wait. It's some consolation to us that he died doing a job he loved."

Sgt David Monkhouse, 35

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (288)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Dragoon Guards

From: Aspatria, Cumbria

Died: 17 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

His mother Bobby: "He was a fun-loving lad – when he was three years old he carried a toy gun and an Action Man. His bedroom was always full of soldiers – when he was a little lad he was always going into the Army.

"He went into the Army Cadets as soon as he could, and he passed all his exams in the Army because that is where he wanted to be. His daughter, Daisy Twinkle, makes life worth living and makes up for what we have lost with David."

L/Cpl Stephen Daniel Monkhouse, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (289)

Service: Army

Regiment: Scots Guards

Medals / Military Awards: Military Cross

From: Greenock, Inverclyde

Died: 21 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Lakshar Gah district

Incident: Shot while trying to rescue a colleague

His father Billy Monkhouse, who has raised more than £7,000 through sponsored hikes and other activities for the Forces Children's Trust: "Stephen doted on Brandon – he just knows his Dad's a star in the sky. Myself and Stephen had planned to do Ben Lomond and Ben Nevis when he got home from the Army. There must have been at least a dozen times on Ben Nevis on the way up when I thought, I'm not going to make this. But I had a photograph of Stephen with me, just his wee photograph, and I could just hear him saying, 'You're not chucking it are you? You're not packing it in?'. It kept you going. I thought, once I'm up there allI've got to do is come down. But you felt closer to heaven because it's the top of Great Britain. I had a few minutes to myself, and a few tears were shed. I don't think you ever get over it, you just learn how to deal with it a bit better. You still have your weak moments. I'd say there are more strong moments than weak moments now. There are certain things, I'm on Facebook and friends with Steve's Army pals. It's just dealing with it rather than dwelling on it. Life goes on and you realise life's a wee bit too short, and a lot shorter for some folk."

Cpl John Moore, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (290)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Bellshill, Lanarkshire

Died: 07 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a blast while on foot patrol

His father Ian Whitelaw: "Johnathan was a much loved boy by his mum, dad, grandmother, sisters and nieces and his men from 1 Scots. From a young age he wanted to join the forces like his 'Da', and after he joined the Air Cadets 266 Squadron in Hamilton, he joined the Army.

"Within a short career he rose from a Private to Corporal and even his CO commented 'he was a high flyer'. Johnathan loved his job. Whether it was leading his men out in the field or onto the dance floor to do the Macarena, he was always at the front, or playing the fool - it's images of him doing this that brings smiles to our faces.

"In Afghanistan, Johnathan would train in 50-degree heat with a backpack on and the men had an expression: 'There's keen and there's John Moore keen'.

"Since that fateful night, our family life has changed. Some people say that time is a great healer. It's not. The family learns to cope, but this is helped by keeping touch with the men who were with Johnathan and the Regiment.

"Of course, there are certain days that we find harder than most, such as his birthday, Christmas and the anniversary of his death. But there are many others in the same situation that have loved ones taken from them. We have to take comfort in knowing that he died doing a job that he loved and his name in now engraved in Hamilton's Roll of Honour in the Town Hall."

Spr Adam Moralee, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (291)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Newcastle, Tyne and Wear

Died: 05 March 2014

Location: Helmand, Camp Bastion

Incident: Injured while preparing equipment for redeployment out of Afghanistan

His family: "Adam was a loving son, fiancé and friend who touched everyone’s hearts that came into contact with him. His passion for cars and anything with an engine made him a true petrolhead through and through. As a son he was full of life and always the joker of the family, who never took anything too seriously. He loved his job and the friends he made from his time in the Army, and he would never have swapped those experiences for the world. He treated his fiancée, Emma, like his princess and the love they shared was clear to all of those who were lucky enough to see it. To be his wife would have made Emma feel like the luckiest girl in the world and they were each other’s one true love and soulmates. Adam touched the hearts of all of us who were lucky to know him and not a day will go by where he is not in our thoughts and hearts. He will be sorely missed by family and friends and forever loved by all. Rest in peace son!"

L/Cpl Paul Muirhead, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (292)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Irish Regiment

From: Bearley, Warks

Died: 06 September 2006

Location: Helmand

Incident: Fatally injured in a Taliban attack on base on 1 September, died in Oman hospital

His mother Violet Claydon: "Paul volunteered to go to Afghanistan quite early on. There wasn’t much TV footage of the fighting in 2006 but some of his friends were already out there, and he said he wanted to be where they were. Paul told me it wouldn’t be dangerous, but I think that was to put my mind at ease so that I wouldn’t worry about him.

''When Paul was little he was quite quiet. He’d be nannied by his two older sisters and he would follow me around and stay close. But when he got older, he became protective of his sisters and his younger brother, and would always make sure no one picked on them. We spoke to some of the lads in Afghanistan and they said he was exactly the same there – always protective and looking out for other people.

''When Paul left for Afghanistan we dropped him at the airport. It was the last time I saw him, other than those final days in hospital. As he was walking through the doors, he turned around and gave me the biggest smile. Paul was very caring to a lot of different people, and that’s how he lived his whole life."

Cpl Kevin Mulligan, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (293)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Alloa, Clackmannshire

Died: 06 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when his Jackal armoured vehicle was hit by an explosion and small-arms fire, alongside two comrades, L/Cpl Dale Hopkins and Pte Kyle Adams

His family: "Kevin was the light and love in all our lives and he will always be close in our hearts."

Cpl Damian Mulvihill, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (294)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Plymouth, Devon

Died: 20 February 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on patrol

His friend Carl Harwood: "Damian was an outstanding member of the Royal Navy Water Polo Squad. A real character who engaged all with his West Country twang. He was a true gentle giant out of the pool and a mentor to the younger players. He was very fiery when it came to his sport and I still haven’t seen anyone with a shot as hard as his. In 2004 there was a very memorable trip to Australia. We had just won a water polo tournament in the Long Tan Pool in Cairns and were invited to a social. Damian was the life and soul of the party, removing his shirt and getting the celebrations into full swing! The day after the night before, Damian was a little worse for wear during the long drive to Townsville. A well-needed truckers’ breakfast on the freeway was required! He was soon back fighting fit after that. Damian will never be forgotten by the Inter Service Water Polo Community and this has been reflected in the Damian Mulvihill Trophy which is awarded annually during the Inter Service Tournament. The players from the Army and RAF teams vote on the most outstanding Royal Navy Player and they are presented with the prestigious award. A true friend and fellow Plymothian, he is always in my thoughts and prayers – RIP Big D."

Tpr James Munday, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (295)

Service: Army

Regiment: Household Cavalry Regiment

From: Birmingham

Died: 15 October 2008

Location: Helmand, Garmsir area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on patrol

His mother Caroline: "James was really good fun, really cheeky, and he had a lovely smile. One minute he was sitting down watching the telly; the next minute he’d be running around making the dog bark and stuff like that.

"He had random sayings he liked. He used to say he was the last of a dying breed, a gentleman. And he used to do lines from the film Borat. And he loved Jim Carrey, he used to do impressions of him. He was a brilliant sportsman. He won gold and silver medals in the Army games for the cavalry. He played rugby as well. And he was in the Musical Ride for the cavalry – which only a few get into.

"He was brilliant at skiing, too. He went to Canada with his dad and his brother Jack and there was a women’s Olympic black run and he went down it straight and his dad said, when he got to the bottom, 'What the hell are you doing, you could have killed yourself'. And James said, 'But what a way to go!'

"Every day I feel the gap in my life. It is six years ago that I lost him and it could have been yesterday."

Rfn Joseph Murphy, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (296)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Castle Bromwich, West Midlands

Died: 10 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed in action by an IED

His mother Jill: "Joe was a lovely lad. He was intelligent and cheeky, beloved by his comrades, with a wicked sense of humour, a talent for drawing and a passion for Aston Villa. From an early age he wanted to be a soldier, much to the irritation of his art teacher. 'If it doesn’t work out in the Army Joseph, you can always be an artist'. But he had a clear vision of what he wanted to do: to join the Army and become a sniper. His Sergeant Major told him once: 'One day you’ll be our RSM.'

"Don’t get me wrong, he could be lippy, but he always had a smile and could win anyone over. ‘I can see your skin through the back of your hair, Dad.’ he said once. ‘You're like baldy locks and the three hairs.' That was Joe. On one occasion he was brought in front of his CO for tagging a sentry post with some well-crafted graffiti. 'He made me chuckle so much I had to turn away and let him go,' the Major later said. Since Joe’s passing, his two great aunts have sold poppies for the British Legion. One of them raised £305 in lieu of presents on her 80th. Happily for the family, his older brother Ben and partner are expecting their first baby four days after Joe’s birthday.

"Joe may not have been such an angel back then but he's an angel now."

Pte David Murray, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (297)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Carlisle, Cumbria

Died: 08 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a suicide bomber while on foot patrol

His family: "A little guy with a big heart. David was the best son, brother, grandson, nephew, cousin and friend that any of us could hope for. Although his time with us was short, he lived every second to the full and taught us the meaning of life.

"David always dreamed of being a soldier like his uncle, papa and granddad. He made us proud, every day, in everything he did. He was the little guy with a big heart, although he would never admit it. He had the biggest, cheekiest grin that we had ever seen and he always made us laugh with his cheeky way.

"David looked after his family in every way he could, his friends were like brothers and sisters to him and his memory will live on through his friends and his family. Although he always wanted us to be happy and would hate to think of us as sad, for a time we will be because we miss him so much. We love you David and are so very proud of you. One day, we will see you again. With love always, your family and friends."

Rfn Stuart Nash, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (298)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Sydney, Australia

Died: 17 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Shot while providing cover for colleagues from compound rooftop

His parents Bill and Amanda: "We are shattered of course, but Stuart was doing what he most wanted to do in life, having harboured a wish for a military career since joining the Cadets at the age of 13. He went to the UK to join up to get a better opportunity to do real soldiering, which he has done, if only briefly. He was a willing volunteer; our soldiers have chosen their profession and we are, and will remain, proud of their willingness to make these sacrifices for the security of all of us who remain at home."

Cpl Lloyd Newell, Not given

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (299)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Not given

Died: 16 June 2011

Location: Helmand

Incident: Fatally wounded by small arms fire while on operations

His family: "He was a man of integrity and principle. He was a natural and talented soldier who loved his work and the military lifestyle. He personified the great British paratrooper – selfless, humble, cheerful and utterly reliable. He did his duty, relishing discomfort as a personal test, and always acting in the greater interests of the team. He attracted friends easily and cared deeply for those around him. His friendship was cherished by all. His vitality was palpable, his dignity natural, his humour refreshing. We salute him."


CSgt Phillip Newman, 36

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (300)

Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment

From: Coventry, West Midlands

Died: 20 September 2007

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Died during a re-supply mission when his vehicle came off the road and overturned

His CO Lt Col Ivan Yardley: "Phillip was well known throughout all ranks of the Battalion as a larger-than-life character and his thirst for adventure was infectious for so many of those who were close to him. He touched many people’s lives, here and abroad; he personified all that was good in a soldier, he led from the front and protected those who could not protect themselves. A tragic loss, but far from a wasted life, I, like so many people who served with Phillip, feel extremely privileged to have known him."

Flt Lt Gareth Nicholas, 40

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (301)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Newquay, Cornwall

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His widow Helen: "He was a loving husband and a devoted father. I feel privileged that he was in my life for 18 years and I have many wonderful memories of our time together. We had only just celebrated our 15th wedding anniversary. My last text from Gareth read: ‘15 years and one day.’"

L/Cpl Ross Nicholls, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (302)

Service: Army

Regiment: Household Cavalry Regiment

From: Edinburgh

Died: 01 August 2006

Location: Helmand

Incident: Patrol attacked with RPGs and heavy machine guns

His grandmother Janet : "I spoke to him on the phone the day before he was going away. He didn't sound worried at all, he just saw it as part of the job."

Cpl Daniel Nield, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (303)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

Died: 30 January 2009

Location: Helmand, Musa Qaleh, north of

Incident: Died from injuries sustained while on a joint patrol with the Afghan National Army

His mother Sheila: "Dan lived for the Army and the job he was doing - he was a forward aircraft controller, which he loved doing, saving many lives. He always said he had two families: the Army and his home life. Dan was very proud coming from Cheltenham: he even had it tattooed around his belly button.

''He had a nickname given to him when he was in Bosnia which was Danny Dogs---, everybody knew him by this name. We didn't mind: it was his life and he enjoyed it until his death. Dan never laughed at you, always with you and loved his life and the job he was doing.”

WO1 Rod Poulter MC: "Cpl Danny Nield was one of the great characters in our Regimental family. I had the pleasure of serving alongside him in the 1st Battalion The Gloucestershire Regiment, commanding him in Cyprus with the then-1 RGBW, and more recently as a fellow Rifleman in the 1st Battalion The Rifles.

''Danny was a very proud West Country soldier and an avid Gloucester RFC fan. Hugely sociable, he believed in working hard and playing harder. Wherever he went he made his mark and inevitably made yet more friends in the process. His death will be felt by his many fellow Riflemen across all seven Battalions of The Rifles. Danny you will be sorely missed but we will never forget you."

Cpl David O'Connor, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (304)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Midhurst, Hampshire

Died: 24 October 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by small arms fire while on patrol

His mother Rosemary Turner: "He was an excellent soldier, but his home was in the bar in camp. He was the epicentre of the social group: he could make them stay out all night and not regret it in the morning because they’d had such good fun. He got to know people incredibly quickly. On his last leave, he walked the West Highland Way with a friend and they met an American woman. A few months after he died, she wrote to me saying what an impact David’s zest for life had made on her.

"He was always a loveable rogue. You never knew what he was going to do next. I was the butt of both my boys' jokes – I couldn’t keep up with their wit. He’d quite often go up to the theatre in the West End to see a musical. He adored Les Miserables. I will never be able to watch that again.

"His biggest passion was parachuting. He had to be out being active: he went to Florida skydiving. He loved the adrenalin, living on the edge.

"As soon as he walked through the door when he was on leave, the house would be in chaos. The dog would go berserk, his stepsister, Tasmin, would start squealing, and the cupboards would soon be empty: he’d eat us out of house and home. I miss that desperately. The thought of him not being here is just intolerable."

Pte Craig O'Donnell, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (305)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Clydebank, Dunbartonshire

Died: 04 September 2006

Location: Kabul

Incident: Killed in a suicide bomb attack

His parents Robert and Lorraine: "Craig was a wonderful son who lived life to the full, and was an ardent fan of Celtic Football Club and the rock band Queen. He was a happy-go-lucky person who always put others first. He was looking forward to moving into married quarters and setting up home with his girlfriend, Jessica, and to the birth of their first child at Christmas. Craig had the ambition to join the regular Army from the age of four, and he talked often about how much he loved serving with The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, which he joined in March 2004. He is sorely missed by all the family - all of whom were extremely proud of him being a soldier, and he was much looked up to by his younger sister Claire."

WO2 Gary O'Donnell, 40

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (306)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

Medals / Military Awards: George Medal

From: Edinburgh

Died: 10 September 2008

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Killed while trying to clear an IED

His widow Toni: ''Gary saved countless lives in Iraq and Afghanistan. He loved what he did and was exceptionally good at it.

"He had a tattoo on his back with the words 'Living the dream' - and that's what he was doing; he wouldn't have been Gary if he wasn't doing that job.

''My youngest son was nine weeks old when he died - but we still talk about him all the time and have reminders of him everywhere in the house. He will always know his father as 'Daddy the Hero'."

Cpl James Oakland, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (307)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Military Police

From: New Moston, Greater Manchester

Died: 22 October 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His aunt Elizabeth: "James – where do I begin? My nephew, godson and friend. I am privileged to have been your 'Aunty Betty'. I watched you grow up and mature into a man. I treasure all the fun times we spent together whilst you were growing up and then all the funny phone calls, letters and texts we shared when you were a serving soldier. You are with me always."

His colleague Cpl Rick Lacey: "Jim was reliable, honest and not afraid to speak his mind. He was one of the funniest people I have ever met. He was loved by all who knew him and will be missed even more. Jim has left a hole in our Company and our hearts that can never be filled. Our thoughts are with his mum, dad, brother and girlfriend Lauren. The memories we have, especially the days and nights out, not forgetting the Army Navy weekends dressed as Smurfs in London, will never ever leave us. Jim we miss you, gone but not forgotten."

Cpl Mark Palin, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (308)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Plymouth, Devon

Died: 18 July 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed by an explosion while escorting a team to recover IED components

His widow Carla: "Cpl Mark Palin – or Mark/Muldoon as he was known to us – was an amazing husband, father, son, brother, uncle and friend. He brought a smile to everyone's faces and had the most infectious laugh that would instantly make you happy. A true legend and hero never to be forgotten."

Capt David Patton, 38

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (309)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Aghadowey, County Londonderry

Died: 27 June 2006

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in gun battle after raid to capture four Taliban members

His widow Paula: "There have been small things we have done to honour my husband David, such as renaming the rural family home in Aghadowey 'Birdsong' - not only was this his favourite book, but when he was repatriated to Northern Ireland it was one of those hot July days, and all we could hear amid the heat was the sound of swallows. But how best to honour him in just a few words? I have given the matter some thought.

''In the end, I believe that the only person qualified to speak on this matter is my husband himself. Let me explain. When his belongings were returned to me from Afghanistan, I discovered, in an envelope, photographs of me and my daughter that I had sent out to him. At the time Joanna was just 13 months old, born exactly a decade after we first met in 1995. He had written on the back of them and this is what I would like to be remembered. On one photograph of me and our daughter, he wrote: P + J, Received….. in Afghanistan……what a morale booster!! I am looking at these photographs, wishing I was with you both in our house with our animals and the tranquillity of Aghadowey. I am deploying soon on the ground; I will be constantly thinking of you both. My two girls. I love you both now and ‘FOREVER’.

I believe he wrote this message on the night he was killed by Afghan rebels. Despite his unflinching loyalty for his regiment and his men, which I wholeheartedly support and applaud, I draw comfort from the fact that he remained in his heart a loving father and husband and that we gave him comfort and courage on that last night."

Tpr Robert Pearson, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (310)

Service: Army

Regiment: Queen's Royal Lancers

From: Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Died: 21 April 2008

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Killed in suspected mine explosion while travelling in a convoy

His Company Commander Maj Jez Stemp: "Tpr Robert Pearson made an immediate impact on his arrival in Afghanistan, quickly demonstrating his abilities as both a highly professional soldier, and a gifted Viking operator. He was an asset to both the Troop and Company alike, and quickly proved to be a courageous and respected member of the team. Tpr Pearson, or 'Chesney' as he was universally known, typically wanted to be involved in everything, and always approached any task with a smile. His relaxed and amiable personality were matched with a good sense of humour and a love of his favoured football team, Blackburn."

Capt James Philippson, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (311)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: St Albans, Hertfordshire

Died: 11 June 2006

Location: Helmand

Incident: Killed in a firefight against suspected Taliban forces

His mother Patricia Quinlan: "James was tough, soft, disciplined, fun and adventurous. He was tough because he was a commando. He was soft because he took his mother camping in Canada - not many 26-year-olds would do that! I drank red wine and he drank Wild Turkey as we sat around a campfire and put the world to rights.

''He would do a bit of yoga and he liked his herbal tea, too. He trained very hard. He was a dive master, a freefall parachutist before he joined the Army and an expert skier. He was also great fun, he loved fancy dress and was always Spiderman. Because of his job we always celebrated when we were all together. I remember him picking me up at the station and Dire Straits' Money for Nothing was thumping out of the car. It was one of my favourites, music that he'd grown up with and he loved. One of the things we tried to console ourselves with when he died was that he'd lived three lives in one."

Cpl Michael Pike, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (312)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Huntly, Aberdeenshire

Died: 03 June 2011

Location: Helmand, Pupalzay

Incident: Fatally wounded by insurgent gunfire during a security patrol

His mother Brenda: "I still find it really hard to talk about this. He was an amazing son who would always look out for us. I was on my own with two girls as well and he just adored his two sisters, Alison and Louise. He wanted to go into the military from as early as I can remember. When he was five, he packed his bag and left home and said he was going to be in the Army. It was all he wanted to do and he joined at 16. He had a wife Ida, and children Joshua and Evelynn. He absolutely adored his children. Michael died saving others. It was an ambush and he gave the order for the vehicles to reverse. If he hadn’t, many more would have died, but sadly Michael was shot and killed during the incident. It was his second tour. It is still as hard today as it was then. It feels just like yesterday. The withdrawal from Afghanistan is the end of an era. It killed my son but whatever happens there after, we are all so proud of Michael."

L/Cpl Joseph Pool, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (313)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Dumfries

Died: 05 September 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by rocket propelled grenade while on an operation disrupting insurgents

His mother Stella: "When Joseph was younger he was up to all kind of tricks. He always wanted to surprise me and also make me happy. When he was three, Joseph surprised me one morning when he managed to give me my cereal in bed and didn't spill a drop anywhere. He was so proud of his wee self.

"When Joseph was about six years old, he got his wee brother out of his crib. He got nappies, cream, wipes and clothes and thought it was no bother to change him, but the smell made him think twice about doing it again. Things never changed much as when he got a bit older. He wrote a letter to the neighbours saying that we were having a party. We knew nothing about it till they came to say they couldn’t make it. When I asked him ‘Why did you this?’, he said, ‘I wanted to make you smile’. When Joseph was older he got his wish and he had his two lovely boys Lee and Jamie. They’re so like him, so full of love and fun. I would not change anything for the memories I have. They are always in my mind and forever in my heart. RIP MY DARLING SON JOSEPH XXXX."

Pte Daniel Prior, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (314)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Brighton, East Sussex

Died: 18 March 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Caught in a bomb blast whilst investigating insurgent activity

His father Ian: "When he was a young boy, Daniel enjoyed playing in the rockpools at a local beach. On one occasion when it was time for the family to go home, Dan discovered a crab on the seaweed-covered concrete slope to the beach. His mother and I could see the crab was dead, but Dan did not realise this. He was concerned it was a long way from its friends and he wanted to return it. So, not wanting to upset him, we agreed. Carrying the crab, he slipped backwards and hit his head on the slope. He picked himself up and his main concern was still for the welfare of the crab, which had been flung away when he fell. He retrieved it and carried it to a rockpool. It was only at this point he started to cry with a painfully large bump forming on his head. A few days before Dan died, a comrade in his company was shot in the ankle. Dan shielded him, gave covering fire and first aid. Still under heavy fire from insurgents, Dan, with the help of others, carried the wounded soldier for some distance out of harm's way. Whilst crossing water, Dan held the wound up to stop it getting wet and becoming infected. When I read this account I was reminded of his attempt to rescue the crab. It typified his selfless character. He would always put another’s welfare before his own. This combined with his mischievous and infectious sense of humour – which made it difficult to tell him off when he was younger, especially when he employed his trademark cheeky grin – helped carry him through life, make friends easily, and make a big impression on everyone he met. He is sorely missed by all who knew him."

L/Cpl Michael Pritchard, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (315)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Military Police

From: Eastbourne, Sussex

Died: 20 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Accidentally shot by a British sniper who thought he was an insurgent laying IEDs.

His family: "Michael David Pritchard, struck down in Afghanistan whilst serving his Queen and Country. A brave and brilliant Military Police Officer, who has left behind a wonderful legacy in his wake, truly the best who others adored and respected. He was a legend amongst men. Most importantly a precious son, brother, grandson, nephew, cousin, best friend and soulmate, deeply loved and missed beyond words by us all. Never a moment passes when our beautiful boy isn't in our thoughts. We love you, darling Michael, and will carry you in our hearts forever."

Gdsmn Daniel Probyn, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (316)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Tipton, West Midlands

Died: 26 May 2007

Location: Helmand, Garmsir

Incident: Killed in attack on patrol

His mother Ann: "Daniel was a lovely, caring individual who always put others before himself. He was the eldest of five children, loved animals, bred budgies while at school, loved his motorbikes, loved the Army. His loss to the family has been heartbreaking to every one of us. He didn’t deserve to go the way he did. But we are reassured that he died doing the job he loved. From Mum and Dad X

Look at a poppy

Wear it with pride

A symbol of the soldiers who died

The red and black stand so bold

It means you’ll never grow old.

You stand so tall with your bearskin hat

A pleasure for all to see

Your boots are polished to a standard high

Your tunic is a glowing red

That stands out for all to see

A Queen’s Guard you’ll always be.

Pte James Prosser, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (317)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Welsh

From: Cwmbran,, Torfaen

Died: 27 September 2009

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala region

Incident: Caught in an explosion while on a vehicle patrol

His mother Sarah Adams: "He was just good and honourable. Those are the words that spring to mind when I try to sum James up. He never caused me a moment's grief when he was growing up, he was just lovely. His smile and his blue eyes could light up a room. He was just so handsome. He had never harboured any ambition to join the Army, it came completely out of the blue. He had always wanted to work as a graphic designer, but then he did a couple of weeks' work experience in a graphic design office and he came home and said 'That's not for me mum.'

"As soon as he joined up he loved it. Everyone loved James, he had a fantastic group of friends and in a way they have become like my extra children. I have got to know more about him through them. He was always really quiet to me, but to them he was the joker. There wasn't anyone who didn't like him, he was just so lovely and easygoing. James was so laidback, nothing fazed him and you could never get a rise out of him.

"Every year on his birthday and on the anniversary of his death, we all get together and talk about him and laugh at the happy memories of him.

"Losing him is not something that ever goes away because it's there every day when you wake up. People say it gets easier in time. I don't know. I have tried to stay positive in James's memory, but five years of not seeing him and not seeing him become the person he could have been is hard.

"It has also been hard for James's brother Josh and sister Emma. Josh was just 16 at the time and he was in the house when the knock at the door came. He heard it all as they told me. James was Josh's hero when he was growing up. He always wanted to be just like him and copy everything he did. James was the one who got him into basketball and he had just been selected for the Welsh under 18 squad at the time, but he has not played basketball since.

"Despite the pain, every time I time I think about James, I smile. I remember when he was a little boy and he was always dressing up as Batman or Superman. The number of times I ended up in hospital with him because he thought he could fly.

"In November 2012 I travelled to Camp Bastion to be at the place where he closed his eyes for the last time. It was something I simply had to do. Being there felt like there had been a weight lifted from my shoulders."

His brother Josh: "I miss the brotherly banter and just hearing his laugh... I can't explain it, its too hard."

His friends, Sarah Beckett, Christie Curran, Lara Homan, Scott Roberts, Dom Jarman and Dan Slade: "We are so proud to have an amazing friendship group and Prosser will always be the star of all our unforgettable memories, he is still the glue that holds our group together. He was a real character with the wittiest sense of humour and will always be remembered for his outstanding one-liners.

"When he died at just 21 he left an empty space that nobody will ever fill, he was far too young to have enjoyed properly what life had to offer him. The amount of respect we have for him is indescribable, he is a true friend and a real hero.

"As we are all maturing there are occasions when its hard knowing that he's not here anymore, nothing will ever be the same without him, the heartache will never go away, but remembering that cheeky smile, it's not hard to brighten up your day."

Cpl Arjun Purja Pun, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (318)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Magdi District, Nepal

Died: 13 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed alongside two other British soldiers by an Afghan soldier

Major Simon Archer RGR, Officer Commanding Gurkha Company [Sittang]: "Cpl Arjun Purja Pun was the consummate professional; intelligent, determined, and brave. He was also a very good leader who knew how to get the best out of his men, especially when the situation demanded it. More than this, though, he will be remembered for his true Gurkha spirit and his ever-present smile."

Cpl Kumar Pun, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (319)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Parbat, Nepal

Died: 07 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by a suicide bomber

His CO Mjr Chris Conroy: "Cpl Kumar was unstintingly professional, calm and respectful of all, never failing to help and always willing to volunteer. On operations in Afghanistan he was steadfast, brave and a true leader. He looked after his soldiers as if they were his own, caring for them and watching over their every move."

His colleague L/Cpl Mankumar Rai: "Cpl Kumar was my best friend and comrade. He was always very good and helpful. I miss my best friend Kumar, may his soul rest in peace in heaven."

Sgt Gary Quilliam, 42

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (320)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From:

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His daughter Angela: "Dad was one of the best things that happened to me. He always wanted the best for me. He will be in my heart for eternity. His soul is watching over us."

Rfn Vijay Rai, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (321)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Deaurali, Nepal

Died: 15 October 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Received fatal gunshot wound when insurgents attacked the checkpoint he was guarding

Commanding Officer Lt Col Fraser Rea: "Rifleman Rai was tough, loyal, uncomplaining and utterly professional. He had a ready smile, a big heart and loved his sport and music. He was deeply committed to his fellow soldiers in Amboor Company and to the local Afghans whose lives he strove to improve during the tour. He came from a military background and was immensely proud to have been selected for service in the British Army. He was a talented young man with vast amounts of promise."


Rfn Yubraj Rai, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (322)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Khotang, Nepal

Died: 04 November 2008

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Died from gunshot wounds while on an operation against the Taliban

L/Cpl Gajendra Rai and L/Cpl Sunil Rai, who both served alongside him: "Dear friend Yubraj, you are our best friend, we will never forget you. We used to go everywhere with you. We shared our thoughts no matter how difficult the days were. We are proud to have been your friend, you are the one who inspired us to be brave men like you. You were a really honest, punctual and gentle person. You know that we used to play football, basketball and swim together; you were a really good competitor. We always used to admire your playing style, which was fantastic. We will remember the day that we all spent the whole night talking about our futures, but you broke your promise, you have left us forever. But we are proud of you and what you did for us, your family and for the Queen. Thank you for being our very best friend, we will always remember you."

L/Cpl David Andrew Ramsden, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (323)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Yorkshire Regiment

From: , West Yorkshire

Died: 23 June 2010

Location: Nahr-e Saraj, Gereshk

Incident: Killed in a vehicle accident with three other soldiers

His mother Shirely: "When he was seven, Dave wanted to join the Army; it was his dream. He could not wait till he was 13 to join the Cadets to do his duty to God and Queen, along with his best friend John. Together they joined the Army at 16 and did tours in Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Iraq and his final tour Afghanistan. The lads all knew him as 'Lizard', as somehow he kept two iguanas in his barracks in Northern Ireland.

"His two brothers and two sisters miss him being part of their lives: to his big brother he was someone to look up to; he would talk problems over with his oldest sister and he would play games and fool about with his younger brother. He was a big kid and they would sit on the floor laughing their heads off – especially on Wii and playstation games. He did everything with his twin sister; they always took care of each other.

"To me, his mum, he was a best friend – he was the only one in the family that would get up and dance with me at any time, any place, anywhere. He was known for being a top lad. He was a morale booster when the boys were down – he would burst into Greenday songs while out on exercise and the lads would join in – he was an 'anyone for a brew' tea-maker, a supporter and someone who welcomed the new young ones. He loved tattoos – he had a big lizard on his back, along with Greenday lyrics to the song Jynx (he thought his life had gone down the wrong path once or twice). His love of keeping good cars was the same as his dress sense – it left much to be desired and was laughed about, but it made him an individual to remember.

"He was forever likeable and his cheeky grin was always there. He was down to earth and saw the good side in everyone. I chose you, we loved you and we all miss you, as you would have said from the song you asked for at your funeral (Greenday's Good Riddance): 'Something unpredictable but in the end is right, I hope you had the time of your life.'"


Pte Tony Rawson, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (324)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Dagenham, London

Died: 10 August 2007

Location: Helmand, Jusyalay

Incident: Shot when his patrol came under heavy fire from Taliban

His friend L/Cpl Ben Lake: "Tony was the friendliest bloke you could ever meet, hence the nickname ‘Nicey’. If there was ever a problem, he was the first to offer his helping hand. If someone was feeling down he would go out of his way to help. He was a cracking soldier and an even better friend."

Pte Jason Rawstron, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (325)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Clayton-Le-Moors, Lancashire

Died: 12 September 2008

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Shot during firefight with Taliban forces

His mother Mandy: "Jason’s smile is what has stayed with me. No matter what people did or said, he would just smile at them. His humour was an important part of who he was but he was a peacemaker as well. He was always the one who sorted everything out. I always knew he would make a good soldier. He and his brother would fight like cat and dog - they were both so different - but they were always there for each other and would back each other up when it came down to it. I didn’t want Jason to join the Armed Forces but I didn’t try and persuade him not to sign up. It was very much his decision and I eventually felt so proud when he was passing out at Catterick.

"I last saw Jason a couple of days before he went to Afghanistan. He didn’t want to go. I remember him just walking down the street with his bags on his own. Once he was there his letters changed. He was trying to be his bubbly, old self but I could tell there was a change in him. Six years after Jason’s death it still feels very raw. I keep in touch with a lot of his friends from the Army and locally we organise a music festival every year. Jason loved music. I remember him in a bowler hat with an umbrella, suited and booted as Sam Sparro doing Black and Gold. We always send the money raised to SSAFA and gave them £550 this year."

Spr Connor Ray, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (326)

Service: Army

Regiment: 33 Engineer Regiment

From: Newport , Newport

Died: 18 April 2012

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Died at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, after being injured by an IED on April 11

His brother Vincent on behalf of the family: "Connor was a typical lad. Growing up, he loved computer games and wanted to be a WWF wrestler. Connor was a strong and loyal youngster. He loved to help others. He was also very irritating and would love to annoy you by playing pranks and being immature in a very amusing way. He had a natural ability to always make you laugh. Growing up he was a very competitive person, he wanted to beat everyone – including myself – at everything. As children we seldom got on – we always fought with each other – but when Connor joined the Army and moved away to Harrogate, our relationship grew a great deal stronger. Connor had a million-dollar smile and he knew it. A massive fan of karaoke, Eighties music, power ballads and Abba, at weekends he insisted on going to the Eighties clubs to dance. Out of our siblings, we all believed Connor was our auntie’s favourite. My grandparents were extremely proud of Connor. Joining the Army was what he wanted to do and it made him the man he became. Losing Connor has left a huge void in our lives. We miss him immensely."

Sgt Peter Rayner, 34

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (327)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Bradford, West Yorkshire

Died: 08 October 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

His widow Wendy: "He was a cheeky chappie. Happy go lucky, full of energy and always brightened things up. In the mornings in Afghanistan he would get up and cook his lads bacon - he always looked after them and when morale was down he was the one who would cheer everyone up.

"Our son Derek is now 11. He was seven when his dad died so he has lots of memories of him. He was a really good dad and they were really close. He doesn’t tell me everything and I guess sometimes it does hurt him a bit, but he is doing well and he is proud of his dad. Every year on Remembrance Sunday we always pay tribute at the cenotaph in Bradford and at his grave because his birthday was on November 11, he would have been 39 this year. We put fresh flowers on the grave and set a few balloons off.

"It is nice to chat with his friends and it is good for Derek because he gets to speak to them about what his dad was like. He was an amazing man, an amazing father and soldier. Everyone that knew him loved him because he was such a character."


Capt Daniel Read, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (328)

Service: Army

Regiment: 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Regiment

From: Newquay, Cornwall

Died: 11 January 2010

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala region

Incident: Killed by an IED

His father Les: "How can I describe my son? He was injured three months before and he came back home. I sat on his bedside and said, 'What you gonna do mate?' and he said go back to his lads [in Afghanistan]. That was Daniel. I didn't want him to go but I could not be prouder of Daniel. I've lost my mother and it's awful but that's the natural order of things. Your child? That changes your life. I used to sit in my conservatory once upon a time and it was peaceful. Now it's an empty world out there.

"I raised £1,500 to have a stained-glass window made in his honour at St Margaret's Church, everyone chipped in - the school that he went to, local people and market stall-holders who didn't even know him. I wanted to do the whole window, but I know Dan would say, 'Stop wasting money, Dad'. His ashes are buried right outside the window. I think it would be wonderful if we could do the rest of the window as well in tribute to all the soldiers, those we've lost and those who have come back injured. It's not a lot of money really and it is there for ever. It's there longer than us." Details at http://rainhamchurch.wordpress.com/2014/10/06/new-window-in-chancel/

RM Benjamin Reddy, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (329)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Ascot, Berkshire

Died: 06 March 2007

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Killed when his unit came under fire

His mother Liz: "We have a funny little memory of Ben when he was little. It’s all about the red baseball cap that he would never part with! Like all children at playschool, Ben was picked to take part in the Nativity play. He was excited about being picked to be a shepherd so we set to making his costume out of bed sheets and tea towels (the usual!). The big day arrived and there was Ben dressed as a shepherd but wearing his red baseball cap which he had refused to take off!! He looked really funny - the only shepherd on the hillside with a red baseball cap!! We will always remember that funny memory of him. Bless him."

Sjt Christopher Reed, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (330)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Plymouth, Devon

Died: 01 January 2009

Location: Helmand, Garmsir

Incident: Died in a routine patrol when his vehicle hit an IED

His parents Brian and Joy: "Christopher was in the Territorial Army and doing a job he believed in. He did that job with pride and honour and with people he respected. He was selected to train the Afghanistan National Army and worked in a Forward Operating Base. He believed he was making a difference.

''Christopher became engaged to Heather on the day he left for Afghanistan and was planning on a wedding when he got home. He touched the hearts of all he came into contact with. Christopher will be sadly missed by his mother, father and brother Andrew, his fiancee Heather, all of his family and friends and all who knew him. We are very proud of what he has achieved and what he was trying to achieve."

Cpl Sean Robert Reeve, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (331)

Service: Army

Regiment: SAS

From: Brighton, East Sussex

Died: 17 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was caught in an explosion

His family: "A dearly loved son, brother, godparent, uncle, grandson, and friend, who was loving, loyal, honourable, selfless and gentle. A pillar of strength that all could turn to. Sean’s professionalism and determination for all that he did was an inspiration to those fortunate to have known him. Taken from us but never forgotten."

Pte Leigh Reeves, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (332)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Leicester

Died: 09 August 2006

Location: Kabul, Camp Souter

Incident: A driver, Pte Reeves died in an accident

His brother Jason, who will be 25 next year - the same age Leigh was when he died in 2006:

"Your ever present smile filled our lives with joy

On February 24th you were to be our first baby boy.

From that day we knew how special you would be

Our beautiful Son, our beautiful Leigh.

A brother, a grandson, a best friend too

A Leicester City supporter, he will always be a Blue.

Someone you could turn to if you needed a helping hand

If only we could see you now, in the life you had planned.

As the years go by without you here

We try to carry on with hope not fear.

Some would say we were unlucky to see you fall

But we were blessed to have you at all.

A shoulder to lean on when we felt down

Leigh was the best at removing a frown.

Never afraid to speak his mind

A more honest, loyal man impossible to find.

This is why it's hard you see

To let go, to let things be.

As years go by memories grow fonder

Time doesn't heal, but our love becomes stronger.

And one day we'll all be together once more

When our time comes and God opens the door.

At the gates of Heaven with the key

A lifetime behind us, our beautiful Leigh."


L/Cpl Robert Richards, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (333)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Royal Marines

From: Betws-y-Coed, Conwy, North Wales

Died: 28 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Died in hospital in Birmingham following a blast striking his Viking vehicle

His uncle Ronald: "Martin was known as 'Rob the Gob' by his mates because he would always stand up for them. He would stand up to their seniors and for the other lads in the Platoon. His Commanding Officer once told me when they were still stationed here they had been booked to go down to the South coast for a bit of a break. It was a new Commanding Officer who had booked the trip and when they were down there, he went to Martin and asked him what he thought of it, asked if he was enjoying himself. And Martin said, ‘Whoever booked this was an idiot. He didn’t think about it or he wouldn’t have booked it a week before pay day!’ – and it was him who organised it. He was a great lad, so well liked and respected by everyone back home. We’re in a small village community here. He played football for the local football team, Machno United, whenever he was home on leave and to this day – five years later – they still remember him. His nickname was Rambo because when he was young he always wanted to be a soldier. And on the team’s football shirts, where the name of the sponsor would be, they have Rambo printed instead. And they have the logo of the Royal Marines on the back.

"He comes from a big family and it’s important to us that we keep his memory alive. We should never forget him. I don’t think anybody could ever forget him. His close friends still always talk about him, and even two of the Marines who were with him in Afghanistan have made friends with some of his mates from home. It’s good to see something nice come from something so terrible."

Cpl Liam Riley, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (334)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Killamarsh, Derbyshire

Died: 01 February 2010

Location: Helmand, near Malgir

Incident: Killed by a roadside bomb while on foot patrol

His family: "Liam was a wonderful son who always wanted to join the Army since he was very young. He loved Army-style stories as a little boy and he took to Army life like a duck to water. He was very conscientious with his Army work and didn’t want to disappoint anyone. We were very proud of him and what he achieved both in life and in his career. Liam liked sport and tried many different ones - long enough to get the kit - but none lasted as long as football. This was his love, and when he was at home he played for both Beighton Magpies and the Throstles and was a keen Sheffield Wednesday supporter. One of the things he asked when he rang home was how ‘Wednesday’ were doing. He loved and respected his family and friends and was very close to his siblings Jonathan and Olivia. He was a bubbly, fun-loving lad and all his family and friends loved him - no-one will ever replace him." Prince Harry was also a friend: “I remember Liam Riley so well from the time we spent serving together at the British Army Training Unit at Suffield in Canada. He was a legend. A really special man who got us all going and heading in the right direction. It was a privilege to have worked alongside him. It is incredibly sad also to hear that Liam died alongside his friend, Lance Corporal Graham Shaw. My heart goes out to their loved ones, and to their many, many friends in their regiment and the wider Army.”

Maj Alexis Roberts, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (335)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: , Kent

Died: 04 October 2007

Location: Kandahar, nr airfield

Incident: Killed by an IED while returning to base after an operation

His CO Lt Col Jonny Bourne MBE: "The convoy Lex was leading was completing its final leg when he was killed. I had listened in when he briefed his soldiers before the first leg of the journey deep in Helmand, and I was there to count the vehicles out when they departed. I took Lex aside for a personal chat before he climbed into his vehicle. He was taking it all in his stride, was calm, positive and entirely in control. His poise was humbling. The British Army has lost one of its finest prospects and the nation has lost a dedicated servant, a demonstrably warm-hearted man of profound integrity and courage - quite simply, a very special human being."

Cpl Andrew Roberts, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (336)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Middlesbrough, Teeside

Died: 04 May 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Died after a mortar rocket attack on operating base

His father Steven: "The occasions that Andrew was home on leave will always come to mind. He used to get us all up early, no matter what the weather, and drive to Scarborough in the pouring rain. We would all be in waterproofs and the girls under umbrellas eating fish and chips. Andrew would just look at us all, asking, ‘What are you all doing?’. No matter what life threw at him, he would just respond with a smile, and get on with it. On one of our family nights he had brought back a bottle of sambuca. He poured several glasses out and proceeded to light them. Bad mistake: he had poured them into plastic glasses, which melted, leaving his mother to clean up the mess. There is one thing for which he never forgave me. We were on a camping holiday and we made Andrew take part in a dance competition. He was the only boy in the competition, competing with Irish dancers and modern street dancers. But he still managed to make it into the finals and win the family an extra week’s holiday. Andrew was the complete family man who worshipped his three children and his partner Paula. There is a void in all our lives since our son has gone. This void cannot be filled and the whole dynamic of our family has changed beyond recognition. We have tried to have family nights in his honour, but it’s not the same."

Cpl Richard Robinson, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (337)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Saltash, Cornwall

Died: 17 January 2009

Location: Helmand, north of Sangin

Incident: Hit by enemy fire while on foot patrol

Acting Sgt Simon Lake, Second-in-Command, OMLT 7: "Cpl Robinson, aka Robbo, joined the ‘Devon and Dorsets’ in March 2004 where he was moved into my room - he was only 17. Robbo was such a cool-minded guy and an excellent soldier. We went to Iraq together in April 2006 and were then placed together in the same team for this Afghanistan tour. He brought so much experience to the team being Recce and Sniper qualified. He made my job so much easier; when I needed something doing, Robbo was always ready and would have it squared away within minutes. It was a great honour to serve with such a great Rifleman, a legend in my eyes. But it was also a great honour to be his friend, a close friend, someone who I will never forget. It is a great loss to me. I know that his family will miss him the most and my thoughts go out to them."

Bdr Samuel Robinson, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (338)

Service: Army

Regiment: Regiment Royal Artillery

From: Carmarthen, Camarthenshire

Died: 08 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His mother Ali: "Sam was a kind, loving and gentle son. He always wanted to be in the Army and when he was 16 he wanted to sign up but I talked him out of it. Then when he was 18, he tried to again but I talked him out – as Mums do – but then when he reached 20, he said to me, 'Mum, I've really got to do this,' so we gave him our blessing. That was his calling and I am extremely proud of him. He used to canoe with our local group, Gwendraeth Valley Paddlers, and they now have an annual race in his honour which goes from Carmarthen to Llansteffan. Of the money raised, half goes to Help for Heroes and the other half goes towards the club. The race last month had more people involved than ever.

"I will always remember walking in the woods in Brechfal with Sam when he was quite young, and he would say to me, 'What am I going to be when I'm older?' and I would reply that he would be a sculptor or work with wood as he just loved nature. Of course, he didn't [do that as a career] but I am so proud of what he went on to do. We lived on a mountain when he was little and he would take a bottle of pop, a picnic and the two dogs and just enjoy the outdoors. A lot of his comrades have written to me and said he was 'a gazelle on land, and a fish in water'. That was Sam."

Gdsmn Craig Roderick, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (339)

Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Cardiff

Died: 01 July 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an Afghan policeman

Major Julian Salusbury: "Soon after arriving in the Battalion, Guardsman Roderick was identified as an excellent young soldier. Fit and energetic, he was a proud Guardsman with a bright future. Quite simply, there was never a dull moment with Guardsman Roderick. He threw himself into his life as a soldier and worked and played hard. Generous, friendly and one of the boys, he was always the first to confidently offer me a shot of tequila on a Company night out. He was much liked and will be sorely missed. Guardsmen Roderick worked hard throughout Mission Specific Training to learn the skills needed to deploy on an operational tour. He said that he joined the Army so that he could go to Afghanistan – he relished the chance for adventure. He was employed in the demanding Police Advisory role requiring the utmost patience and professionalism – Guardsman Roderick displayed both with aplomb. His honest, straightforward and inclusive nature endeared him to his Afghan partners: he was a key part of the team."

Cpl Taniela Rogoiruwai, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (340)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Nausori, Fiji

Died: 15 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Shot while on security patrol

His family: "Dan was such a loving husband, who dedicated his life to his work and especially his family. He will be sorely missed by his friends, workmates and especially by his wife and three-year-old son, Matthew. You will always be remembered in our hearts, Daddy. Rest in peace Dan Rogoiruwai."

Gdsmn Michael Roland, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (341)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Worthing, West Sussex

Died: 27 April 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Died after being shot while on an operation to disrupt insurgent activity

His father Barry: "When Michael went away he was so happy because he had become a father. His twin boys were born in January 2012, and he'd just spent three months with them. He was only going away for six months and was focused on making plans for what he could do when he came back to spend more time with them. He had finally got the couple of kids that he wanted and they were coming to live with us. It was all sorted for him. The way that we have coped with his loss is that while he has gone, his kids, who are now two-and-a-half, are still with us. In fact, we are bringing them up. Obviously we mourn Michael’s loss, but we have got his future with us and they take up virtually all of our time, so we cannot get too down about him not being here. He had always wanted a family. Now his boys are with us and they are just totally fantastic and give us a sort of focus and direction. We have got a holiday home in the West of Ireland and that is where Michael spent most of his holidays. Now his kids are going there and playing on the same beaches that he used to play on. It is like going back 20 years, to when we took Michael and his brother there."


L/Cpl Christopher Roney, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (342)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Tyne and Wear, Sunderland

Died: 22 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Suspected "friendly fire"

His family: "Christopher was a doting father to son William, a loving husband to wife Lorna, a fantastic son and an amazing brother. He was a rare type of person, a one-in-a-million you might call it. He always had a few jokes up his sleeve to cheer you up if you were feeling down and it didn’t matter where you were or what you were doing, he was always able to bring a smile to your face, with his quick wit and his cheeky smile. It’s what we all loved about him.

"Chris was an incredible young man who had his whole life ahead of him. He had a good heart an amazing personality and was loved by everyone that knew him.

"He is missed so much, it is hard to put into words. L/Cpl Chris Roney BORN A LEGEND, DIED A HERO, gone but never forgotten."

Sgt Ben Ross, 34

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (343)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Military Police

From: Bangor, Gwynedd

Died: 07 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by a suicide bomber

His widow Sheena: "A very loving husband, a gentleman, his family are so very proud of him. A genuine, quiet, selfless man who was the centre of my world. He will be missed by all who knew him."

His mother, Susie, said: "'Perhaps they are not stars but openings in Heaven where the love of our lost ones shines down upon us to let us know they are happy.' We love and miss you, darling Ben. There is not one day that goes by that we don't at some point think of you. Forever in our hearts - your loving mum."

Spr Jordan Rossi, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (344)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Baildon, West Yorkshire

Died: 23 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died following an explosion while on patrol

His mother Theresa: "He was such a lovely boy. He was a right positive happy person. He had a real soft spot for his granddad. His granddad was a Para, so there was a lot of banter between them over what was better, the Paras or the Royal Engineers. Everyone was touched by Jordan when they met him. They were all so touched when he died too. They all had something good to say about him. Christmas is very different now. It's the same in a lot of ways, with a lovely dinner and everything, but there is just this massive gap at the middle of it. It's awful but one thing is that you learn a lot about people when they die. All his friends told us all these stories about him! He was the youngest in his troop, but they all said that he was the one who kept their spirits up. He had two sisters and a brother and we all miss him so much."

L/Cpl Kenneth Rowe, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (345)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Army Veterinary Corps

From: Newcastle

Died: 24 July 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by insurgent fire while on routine patrol

His mother Lyn: "Family and friends meant the world to Kenneth after growing up in a large close-knit and slightly crazy family. As a result he grew up into a fun-loving, cheeky Geordie who loved to play practical jokes on everyone and generally always have a laugh. He was always very active, participating in every sport you could think of and had a strong competitive nature - he didn't like to lose!

"Ken always had a huge love for all animals, somehow managing to smuggle in a wide range of different pets, slowly turning the family home into a small zoo. All of the above meant he was perfect for his role within the Royal Army Veterinary Corps working closely with his dogs. His career became one of his great loves and this has been demonstrated through his talent, success and the praise he has received, such as being described as 'a rising star'.

"No words can ever really describe him and do justice to the wonderful, funny, kind, loving person he was to all who knew him. His larger-than-life personality and character always ensured he was the centre of attention, making the massive hole he has left behind impossible to fill. We are all so proud of him and the man/soldier he became. There isn’t a day goes by where we don't think of him and feel so much love, tinged with sadness."

Spr Daryn Roy, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (346)

Service: Army

Regiment: 21 Engineer Regiment Group

From: Consett, County Durham

Died: 03 May 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb

His father Alan: "Daryn(Daz) to all his friends had a happy-go-lucky personality, someone who lived his life without regrets. He loved the Army and was immensely proud to be a Sapper in 21 Engineer Regiment. The whole family and all his friends, and all of the Dipton community where he lived were very proud of what he achieved in his short life and is sadly missed by all his family and friends.

"There is one story that comes to mind from his section Commander, Cpl Liam Ord, who travelled up and down the A1 with him and who had to endure Daryn's quick wit about Newcastle getting relegated to the Championship. Cpl Ord never understood why Daryn supported Liverpool. He was a huge fan and in the end Cpl Ord just gave up asking him why,as Daryn just smiled and would say that they were the better team."

Tpr Jack Sadler, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (347)

Service: Army

Regiment: Honourable Artillery Company

From: Exeter, Devon

Died: 04 December 2007

Location: Helmand

Incident: His vehicle was hit by an IED, which also injured two colleagues

His mother Jeannette: "He was the son I bore and miss every day. Jack’s funeral took place on a cold December day in the awesomely beautiful Exeter Cathedral. It was packed with over 600 of his friends and family, but I could see no one through my tears. I could only focus on the lonely coffin as I struggled to believe that I would never see my precious boy again. Jack was a fun-loving and mischievous boy with a wry sense of humour. He was also extremely honest and loyal. There was an incident where, following a school field trip, damage to one of the seats in the coach was reported and the boys were summoned to the headmaster’s office to discover the culprit. Jack knew who the culprit was but he also knew that the boy in question was on a 'three strikes and you’re out' sentence for previous bad behaviour. So Jack took the blame. Shock! Horror! Jack, a vandal? I could hardly believe it, but Jack was always so scrupulously honest! It must be true. No one thought for a minute that he might be protecting someone - except Jack’s year tutor. She rang me. 'This just is not like Jack,' she said. 'We have to get to the bottom of it.' Gently, I did get the truth from Jack but we kept his confidence and the other boy got away with it. Silly, lovely boy. My boy Jack. I am forever a heartbroken Mum."

Lt John Charles Sanderson, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (348)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Oklahoma, , United States

Died: 11 August 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died in a UK hospital following an explosion while on patrol

His father Ian Sanderson: "Those who knew him remember his infectious, inspiring smile and zest for life. John ensured he made the most of his opportunities to travel and learn more about the world. His glass was always half full and his positivity rubbed off on those around him. He was always there to pick you up when you were down and to spur you on, and he took his enthusiasm and positivity into his military career.

"He cared deeply about his men and took a genuine interest in their lives, both professional and private. He believed in their mission in Afghanistan and was keen to see how their lives could be improved. He truly believed in the stabilisation of Afghanistan and on occasions when local nationals and others seemed negative, he always saw the best in people. Despite the often high intensity of combat operations, he remained focused on how he could help those living there. Noticing that a lack of basic veterinary care for local animals led not only to the the loss of liuvestock but also threatened people's livelihood, he campaigned passionately for a vet to come to the area. Although he did not achieve this in his time there, it happened on the following tour and proved successful.

"His letters home captured both the challenges being faced and his desire to succeed. Mindful of what an anxious time his deployment was for friends and family, he was careful to make sure his letters sent love and reassurance. His empathy for others partnered with his love of life made him a great boss, a wonderful friend, a treasured cousin, grandson and brother and a much loved son.

"He will always be missed but the many happy memories we have of him help to keep him alive in our hearts and his smile shines on."

L/Cpl Paul Sandford, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (349)

Service: Army

Regiment: Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters

From: Nottingham

Died: 06 June 2007

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Shot while on patrol clearing a Taliban compound

His brother Matt: "Everyone who ever met him knew he was a trusted friend. Of course, you have brotherly fallouts, but he was always there for you. He was an all-round good guy. He was very much about his friends in the Army and he'd come back with half of them to my Dad's house - you'd suddenly have 17 lads at your door. But that was him, he would never leave one behind. He loved his wife and was looking forward to life with her. With loving memories from all the family."

Sig Ian Sartorius-Jones, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (350)

Service: Army

Regiment: 200 Signals Squadron

From: Runcorn, Cheshire

Died: 24 January 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Died from a gun shot wound. An inquest ruled that he took his own life

His family: "Ian was a lovable character, a devoted father to Dylan, husband to Kellyanne, a wonderful son to Robert and Amanda, and brother to Alan. He will always be missed and loved by all his family and friends."

Cpl William Savage, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (351)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Ardrossan, Ayrshire

Died: 30 April 2013

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed along with two others while travelling in an army vehicle hit by an IED

His widow: "I have lost the love of my life and the father of our son. I know his life will live on through so many amazing memories that we shared together. He will be deeply missed amongst family, friends and the Regiment."

Capt Tom Sawyer, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (352)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: , Hertfordshire

Died: 14 January 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Killed in an explosion while on a mission

His family: "Our family chain has been broken but what we shared can never be taken away. Our precious memories and the love we shared are with us always. So proud of you and the man you became. Sleep tight, precious son, you have earned your rest. Love you."

His widow Katy: "Best husband, son and brother we could ever have asked for. Dedicated to the Army and his lads; he was loyal, loud and loving. He will leave a big hole in all of our lives but will always be remembered as our hero."

L/Cpl Richard Scanlon, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (353)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Queen's Dragoon Guards

From: Rhymney, Gwent

Died: 17 November 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: One of two soldiers killed when their armoured vehicle hit an IED

His sister Lisa: "Before Richard left us he was referred to as a legend for his outstanding character and lust for life. He is, and will be, eternally missed and we will remember his cheeky smile with love and fondness."

S. Sgt. Olaf Schmid, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (354)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

Medals / Military Awards: George Cross

From: Winchester, Hampshire

Died: 31 October 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died while trying to defuse roadside bomb

His widow Christina: "Oz was fearless and didn’t need any coaxing or encouragement. When others needed a few drinks before jumping in a Norwegian Fjord, he would have a coffee and a fag and dive and swim in icy water as if it was bathwater. He would have been comforted in his death to know that indirectly he raised the profile of Afghanistan when it was off the political and public radar, at a time when two or three amputees were being regularly brought back from the conflict. His death made politicians and the upper echelons of the military more accountable and resulted in changes to practice and policies to look after our troops, instead of just leaving it to charities to pick up the tab for injured or dead.

"As he said, ‘It’s just a job and some of us go in for one reason, then years later end up in Afghan in roles, often as politicians' playthings’. He saved so many lives – civilian and military – that he will always be remembered and he didn’t die in vain. I miss him making Cornish pasties and his friendship more than anything else. Britain, his family and his community are the poorer for losing him, but he lives on every day in our hearts.

Cpl Lee Scott, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (355)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Tank Regiment

From: Kings Lynn, Norfolk

Died: 10 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed in an explosion during Operation Panther's Claw

His widow Nikki: "When I think of Lee, a big smile comes across my face and I think that's the same for anyone who knew him.He was so full of life and had so much energy. He was loving, kind, thoughtful and funny.Lee was not only an amazing soldier he was also an incredible Daddy to Kai and Brooke. Not a day goes by when Lee's name is not spoken or he is not thought about. He will always be in our hearts and he will always live on through the charity Scotty's Little Soldiers which was founded in his memory."

Sjt Phillip Scott, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (356)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Edinburgh

Died: 05 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED

His widow Ellen: "My husband was a very brave man, loved by all his family and a very dear husband and father."

Pte Thomas Sephton, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (357)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Warrington, Chesire

Died: 05 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died in Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, following a blast during an IED clearance operation

His friend Pte Charles Emina, 1 Mercians: "Sefo was my closest friend in the world; we were like brothers. He was always the life and soul wherever he went. He loved his friends and family more than anything. He was always first out of the gate on patrol and had pride doing his job for his country. He saved the lives of his section on two occasions and on that tragic day he saved my life and gave his own.

"He is a true hero to his friends, family and his country and as a nation we owe him a debt of gratitude. I love him with all my heart and I will be lost without him. All my love goes to him and his family while he rests in peace."

Gdsmn Jamie Shadrake, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (358)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: South Wales, South Wales

Died: 17 August 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed while on sentry duty during enemy action

His Commanding Officer, Lt Col James Bowder: "Guardsman Shadrake was an extraordinary young man. Bright, committed and imbued with boundless energy, his enthusiasm and lust for life were infectious. He was a talented soldier with a huge amount to offer and would have gone a long way in the Army. Indeed, he was determined to do so, not least in order to impress his elder brother who is a Platoon Sergeant in the battalion."

Kgn David Shaw, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (359)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's

From: Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria

Died: 16 January 2013

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Died in hospital in the UK from wounds suffered in combat

His sister Sarah: "He was always quite active. We’d play rounders on the front street with our sister Michelle and brother Charlie, build dens in the trees and make go-karts to go down the hill. During the summer holidays, we used to go to a football camp. We’ve still got a photograph of me, David and Charlie there and he’s got such a lovely grin on his face. He was a bit mischievous. He drew a cat’s face on our television with a felt tip when he was five – and he blamed me for it. I used to wind him up something chronic, but it backfired as he got older and bigger: he would get me in headlocks. When he was about 16, I realised he was too big and I couldn’t pick on him any more.

"When he was in Afghanistan, he would call us a lot. He was away for his last Christmas, but he called me on Christmas morning at 8am. He said there had been a food fight in the mess over their Christmas dinner.

"He was very cuddly. Every time I saw him, he would have a cuddle. It didn’t matter if I’d only seen him the day before, he’d always give me a big hug.

"I don’t get phone calls out of the blue like I used to. I still expect a phone call asking how I am or a quick message on Facebook, even now. I miss speaking to him, I miss the hugs."

L/Cpl Graham Shaw, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (360)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

Died: 01 February 2010

Location: Helmand, near Malgir

Incident: Killed by a roadside bomb while on foot patrol

His family: "Russ and Karen Shaw, and all the members of Graham’s family, are deeply saddened by the loss of a beloved member of the family, who has been taken away from us in the prime of life. Graham enjoyed life to the full, running everywhere. He ran to visit relatives in Calderdale and often ran on the moors near his home. He was very active and took part in many different sports from skydiving last summer to skiing with the Army in Canada and surfing on the south coast - he was up for anything. Graham was a soldier from 16 when he attended the Army Foundation College in Harrogate. He was proud to be a member of the British Army like his father before him. He knew the danger that he was to face whilst serving in Afghanistan. He lost his life doing the job he liked and enjoyed. We are all very proud of our hero."


Rfn Adrian Sheldon, 25

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (361)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Kirkby-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire

Died: 07 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died when his Jackal vehicle was caught in an explosion

His family: "Adrian was the most kind, generous, caring individual you’ll ever wish to meet. He was truly beautiful inside and out. From 10 years old, he wanted to be in the Army. He joined the Cadets and it just went from there. He was in the Army for 10 years and he'd had quite a few tours - Iraq, Sierra Leone – before Afghanistan. He loved coming home to us, to spend time with his family and friends. But he also liked to have his quiet time too, watching his favourite DVDs, of which he became a true critic.

"Our journey from the day we were told we had lost Adrian to this present day has been a truly harrowing experience which has torn our family apart. It's like pieces crumbling away from us that can never be repaired - that's the only way we can describe it. Adrian is loved and missed every minute of each day and we are all truly heartbroken.

"We will always keep his memory alive and in the past five years have raised over £20,000 for Help For Heroes, the Army Benevolent Fund and the British Legion by walking the Three Yorkshire Peaks and Hadrian's Wall. Adrian is our true hero. We are so proud and honoured to be his parents, and Amy to be his sister.

"Our son and our brother, forever will we be by your side. Your loving parents, Mark and Dianne, and sister Amy.

His father: "My son had an enviable depth and maturity to his character. He was proud to serve Queen and country. That's what he always wanted to do - to be a soldier."

Capt Daniel Shepherd, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (362)

Service: Army

Regiment: Joint Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group

Medals / Military Awards: George Medal

From: Lincoln, Lincolnshire

Died: 20 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed trying to defuse a roadside bomb

His parents David & Judith: "Capt Daniel Marc Shepherd, was an amazing son, brother, uncle, grandson and husband. Army Cadets at 13 years old set out his future career plan to be an Army officer. Daniel loved and lived life to the full, and was passionate about his chosen career in the Army. He genuinely believed that the role he was carrying out as a specialised bomb disposal expert would make a difference to the saving of life for his fellow soldiers and the people of Afghanistan. No amount of time will ever heal our pain and sorrow, all we have now are loving memories, he is so sadly missed.

Our son the soldier,

How great a man he must be,

To join in the fight to set another part of the world free.

So very proud of you we are,

To all of us who loved you,

You will always be our shining star.

Taken from us in a far away place,

Now we have to close our eyes

To see your smiling face.

Our hearts have been broken,

In our thoughts every day,

Precious memories are now our only token

Missed so much, Our Hero Daniel."

L/Cpl Steven Sherwood, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (363)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment

From: Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire

Died: 29 October 2005

Location: Balkh, Mazar-e-sharif

Incident: Shot when convoy came under fire

(Video) And We Will Remember Them

His parents Jeanie and Alan: "It is nine years since we lost Steve in Afghanistan. There has not been a day of those nine years in which Steve not been in our thoughts. Nieces and nephews which Steve will never see, have been born and all of them are, or will be, aware of the uncle they have not met. We speak of him often, usually with humour as our memories of him are dominated by the many escapades he always seemed to find himself involved in. We wonder about the man he would have been now. Would he have married? Would he have children of his own? How would his career in the Army have developed? It was a life he loved and it presented him with many opportunities he may not, otherwise, have had. We would never have tried to deprive him of that life, we are just constantly saddened by his death and the deaths of all the other young men who have lost their lives over the years. To best sum up our feelings, we would quote what is written on Steve’s gravestone: 'To the world he was a soldier, to us he was the world'."

WO2 (QMSI) Dan Shirley, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (364)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Leicester, Leicestershire

Died: 27 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Camp Bastion

Incident: Killed when his vehicle overturned while on patrol

His parents Geoff and Jan: "When Dan was little, we'd go on holiday and he would play soldiers in the sand dunes. All Dan wanted to do was be a soldier. He joined the Cadets when he was 13 years old, then enlisted at 16. He loved the Army and he worked hard at it; he believed he was doing a good job. Suddenly, we lost Dan in June 2008. As parents, we will never get over this, but we've learnt to live with it. Our grandchildren help to keep us going and we have wonderful memories of Dan. He was always smiling, he always seemed happy. We always talk about him with the grandchildren; they ask questions and we show them photographs. His daughter Jordan remembers Dan because she was six, but Aidan was only 18 months old. Jordan has his eyes and when you look at Aidan, it is like you are looking at Dan. The last time he returned to Afghanistan we spoke about it and I didn’t want him to go back. He said hopefully we are doing some good there. One thing he always said was: 'when your time’s come, it’s come. It could happen anywhere.' That’s how he felt. The last time we heard from Dan, it was Father’s Day and he left a message on the phone for his Dad. We always said 'love you' to each other. He said: 'Love you, Dad'. We kept that message for quite a while."

Pte Ratu Silibaravi, 32

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (365)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Fiji, Fiji

Died: 04 May 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Died after a mortar rocket attack on operating base

Lt Col Simon Bell, Commanding Officer: "A quiet, yet determined and popular soldier, Pte Silibaravi was a professional and committed individual. Strong and fit, he had an excellent work ethic, throwing himself wholeheartedly at every challenge."

Rfn Daniel Simpson, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (366)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Croydon, London

Died: 10 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed in action by an IED

His colleague Rfn Sherlock: "Anytime you felt down, Simo would soon sort that out, as it was impossible to feel miserable around such a bloke with his quick wit and cheeky smile. He was a bundle of joy, a barrel of laughs and the 9 Platoon morale-maker. He loved his job and being with the lads and was intensely proud of his Battalion. He was the best mate anyone could ask for, a rock in my life. He will be sorely missed by many, never forgotten and loved always."

Tpr Ashley David Smith, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (367)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Dragoon Guards

From: York, Yorkshire

Died: 18 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by a blast while guarding comrades

His parents Sandra and Dave and family: "Tpr Ashley Smith was the youngest of a very close family and doted on his parents. He worked hard and was passionate about what he was doing and proud of all he had achieved. He cared deeply about his family and the many friends he had in the Army and in his home city of York. Everyone who knew Ashley loved him. He was the best son any mother and father could have wished for, and a loving brother to his brothers and sisters. Ashley will be sorely missed and we are immensely proud of our son."

RM Darren Smith, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (368)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Fleetwood, Lancashire

Died: 14 February 2009

Location: Helmand, South-west of Sangin

Incident: Died from wounds sustained after being shot at by enemy units while on patrol

His Section Commander Cpl John Ballance: "When I was told Daz was going to join my section I had a feeling of satisfaction. Always first to volunteer for any task, both the ‘Gucci’ ones and the mundane, he’d get it cracked with the minimum of fuss, never seeking any recognition for his efforts. Always there with a cheeky smile even when everyone else was feeling down, he never failed to lift the section’s spirits. His fishing stories became legendary within the troop and a source of constant amusement. How one man could be so enthusiastic about the world’s most boring sport we’ll never know! Devoted to his girlfriend Kelly and his little girl Keira, he would speak of them with great love during quieter times; everyone’s thoughts go out to them. A truly genuine guy, Daz will never be forgotten by those who had the pleasure of knowing him."

Spr Mark Antony Smith, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (369)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Swanley, Kent

Died: 26 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin district

Incident: Died in a suspected "friendly fire" incident

His Commanding Officer, Lt Col David Southall: "Sapper Mark Smith, or Smudge to his friends, was one of life’s real characters. A scruffy, loveable wheeler-dealer, he was often near to, but never seemingly the cause of, endless mischief. Big in character and big in heart, he’d charm his way out of the stickiest of situations and we loved him for it. Having served the Corps for eight years, Smudge volunteered for a second tour in Afghanistan as part of a counter IED search team.

''He plied his trade daily, hunting out IEDs in the most deadly of areas. As an accomplished senior Sapper, the younger lads relied much on his presence; his sharp eye and quick wit sustained them all through thick and thin. Mark’s death, a tragic accident, shocked us all."

L/Cpl Matthew Smith, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (370)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Engineers

From: Surrey, Aldershot

Died: 10 August 2012

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali district

Incident: Shot while trying to build a checkpoint

His mother Caroline Smith: "A loving father to four beautiful children, who will be dearly missed by his fiancée, mother, father, family and friends. Our Hero, RIP."

WO2 Michael Smith, 39

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (371)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: Liverpool

Died: 08 March 2007

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in a grenade attack on his base

His CO Lt Col Neil Wilson: "Sgt Maj Smith was an indomitable character and an institution both within his Battery and the wider Regiment."

SAC Luke Southgate, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (372)

Service: RAF

Regiment: Kandahar Airfield Defence Force

From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk

Died: 24 February 2010

Location: Helmand, north of Kandahar Airfield

Incident: Killed by an IED while on vehicle patrol

His family: "We cannot find the words to describe the tragic loss of our dear son Luke. He was the best son, brother and boyfriend any of us could ever have wished for. He died doing the job he loved and always wanted to do. He will be in our hearts always and our thoughts forever."

RM Georgie Sparks, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (373)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Epping, Essex

Died: 27 November 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Attacked with RPGs while on the roof of a building

His sister Katie: ‘"Georgie, my brother, my friend. There are not enough words to describe how much you mean to me and how much I love you.

"G was the best brother I could have wished for. He was one in a billion, a legend and a hero. We as a family were blessed to have had him around, even if it was for such a short time. He touched so many hearts, and I feel privileged and honoured to call him my brother. From a young age his dream was to be a Royal Marine, always dressing up in his camouflage, climbing trees and playing in the fields where we live. He succeeded as he always did and made this dream come true. But it did not stop there. He also went on to win the Commando Medal and become a Royal Marine sniper. I am so proud of him for doing that. He was my Dad’s best friend, my Mum’s baby and loved by all.

"He had so much to give and asked for so little in return: always smiling he could brighten up your darkest day just by walking in the room. He always put others before himself, a true example of this is what he did in Afghanistan. It caused his death and took his precious life away from us. I cannot express how much we all miss him. It still does not feel real. He will be in my thoughts all day, every day. I hold his heart in my heart. God always takes the best. You are truly missed by all x."

Flt Lt Allan Squires, 39

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (374)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Clatterbridge, Wirral

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His family: "He was a universally loved and respected member of the Kinloss family. He was an exceptional pilot, aircraft captain and flying instructor whose experience and professionalism has touched a whole generation of Air Force pilots. Always willing to work hard, he loved his flying, along with the camaraderie and team spirit which he found as part of a Nimrod crew and the Royal Air Force. Although outwardly quiet, Al had a real thirst for life. In sport, he was a gifted runner who trained hard and raced hard. However, Al’s greatest passion was his family. He was a devoted husband to Adele and a doting father to Abigail and Graeme. He will be truly missed."

Cpl Jack Stanley, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (375)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Queen's Royal Hussars

From: Bolton, Greater Manchester

Died: 08 April 2012

Location: Helmand, Pupalzay Kalay

Incident: Died in hospital in the UK after being wounded in an IED blast on Feb 3

His mother Brenda: "Jack was a kind, generous lad with a ready smile. His dedication to his Regiment was equalled only by his passion for Bolton Wanderers Football Club."


Rfn Sheldon Steel, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (376)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Leeds, West Yorkshire

Died: 27 November 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His sister Cody Steel: "Sheldon was a lot of things to a lot of people: a friend, a brother, an inspiration, a true hero. He touched so many peoples lives and had a huge impact on us all.

"He's missed by so many and not a day goes by when we don't think about him and treasure our precious memories we have of him."

Cpl Matthew James Stenton, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (377)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Dragoon Guards

Medals / Military Awards: Military Cross

From: Wakefield, Yorkshire

Died: 21 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Lakshar Gah district

Incident: Shot while trying to rescue a colleague

His family: "Matthew always took life in his stride and never lost sight of the important things in life – his family and friends."

Cpl Seth Stephens, 42

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (378)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Special Boat Service

Medals / Military Awards: Conspicuous Gallantry Cross

From: Poole, Dorset

Died: 01 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Haji Wakil

Incident: Killed during a special forces mission. Awarded posthumous Conspicuous Gallantry Cross for selfless bravery

His widow Karen: "In May 2010, Seth prepared once again for another operational tour of Afghanistan. We were accepting of this routine and valued our family time, particularly when there was a period of separation ahead. There were milestones that Seth was most likely going to miss while he was away: Molly, aged 11, was transitioning from primary to senior school; Heather, aged 15, was going to be undertaking her Duke of Edinburgh Silver expedition, and Seth and I were going to be celebrating our 20th wedding anniversary in August.

"Having met at school, I had spent my entire adult life with Seth and felt secure and happy with the life we had. Seth balanced his work and home life as best he could; he was adventurous, committed, caring and devoted to the three of us and we accepted that he had to work away for long periods from time to time. He never burdened us with worries or heightened my concerns and I always felt confident that he would return home.

"The news that Seth was taken from us was devastating and has changed the course of our lives for all time. However, near at hand were the Royal Marines' military family and they embraced us. We never feel forgotten or hidden away. They offered us a security that was swept away that day and I shall always feel indebted to them.

"The children too have been supported in many ways and, just before the Christmas following Seth’s death, we were invited to a children’s Christmas party at 10 Downing Street, where we met other bereaved families. It was there that we heard about the good work of the Forces Children’s Trust and how it offers children like Heather and Molly opportunities to participate in enriching experiences that allow them to make new friends. Molly, in particular, has benefited from their support and has formed friendships that will, I’m sure, be cherished for the rest of her life.

"Seth was awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross for his act of selfless bravery, which led to his death on July 1, 2010. But his sacrifice saved the lives of his comrades on that day. He was skilled and professional and I never doubted his commitment to those he worked with. After spending time away, he always slipped effortlessly back into family life; he was a spontaneous person who would make the most of every opportunity to relax and have fun. We miss him terribly but I am certain he would be so proud of Heather, who is now at university, and Molly, who is studying for her GCSEs. We have done our best to adjust to having a depleted family and, although we will continue to suffer sensitive days, we are at a stage when we can look back and smile as we remember him. When I think of Seth I feel immense pride and feel honoured and grateful that we filled such a big part of his life."


Cpl Graeme Stiff, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (379)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Died: 15 March 2009

Location: Helmand, Garmsir area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while travelling in a Jackal armoured vehicle

His father Lt-Col David Stiff and mother Hilary: "Graeme was born in the British Military Hospital at Munster, Northern Germany. He spent his early school days as big brother to Mike in Germany and southern England. In 1985, Graeme and Mike became boarders at St James in Grimsby, close to their surviving grandparents who were outstanding ‘in loco parentis’ during the many postings of Mum and Dad.

"Graeme and Mike made many wonderful friends at St James and both became Head Boy in consecutive years, a wonderful first for the school and a proud moment for their family. The family stays in touch with the St James ‘gang’ and still attend an annual football tournament held in Graeme’s honour. Graeme’s closest friends form a team which remain undefeated but we suspect that it won’t be long before age takes its toll!

"In 2003 Graeme eventually followed in his father’s footsteps and joined the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. He loved every minute of his time in the Army and in 2009, when given the choice to take a promotion course or go to Afghanistan, he selflessly and bravely chose the latter.

"Graeme enjoyed every minute of his brief but full career and according to the testament of Commanding Officers (some of whom are personal friends of his father) and Army buddies he was highly regarded and will be sorely missed.

"Graeme was a lively lad who loved a party and had a very easygoing outlook on life. He was in a wonderful, steady relationship with the beautiful Lauren and was all set to have a flourishing military career. He is sorely missed by all who met him. Graeme continues to be a very much loved son, brother, grandson, nephew and cousin who gave his life so that we may all live betters ones.

"Sleep well bonny lad, Galaxy - Mum & Dad xxx."

Pte Gregg Stone, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (380)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Yorkshire Regiment

From: Hull, East Yorkshire

Died: 03 June 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by small arms fire whilst on patrol

His widow Samantha: "Gregg and I were childhood sweethearts and we met at school – he was my soulmate. He was a brilliant husband and a family man who loved his family. He was always the one to want to make us laugh – he always cheered everyone up. He was proud to be a soldier and for what he had achieved in his work. He would also want me to mention his dog Benji who he loved to bits.

His parents and siblings: “He will always be a true hero in all our hearts! Anyone who was blessed enough to have known him will know how much of a credit to his friends and family he was. Words cannot begin to describe this great loss, and we are exceptionally proud of Gregg for everything he was, has, and still is. Gregg was the kindest, funniest, friendliest, most popular lad that you could wish to meet. This is the saddest loss of our laughing boy.”

AER Paul Stout, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (381)

Service: Army

Regiment: SAS

From: Liverpool, Merseyside

Died: 17 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was caught in an explosion

His family: "Paul was a loving father and devoted husband. He was a wonderful son and brother and will be greatly missed by all his family and friends. Our lives will be changed forever by this loss."

His brother Adam: "I don’t know what to say, mate, I am totally devastated. Not only did I lose my brother, but I lost my BEST mate too. I will never forget you, you are a true hero. RIP mate xxx."

Fsr Petero Suesue, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (382)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

From: Levuka, Fiji

Died: 22 May 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Shot while on foot patrol

His family: "Petero epitomised the qualities of the Fijian Fusilier. He was strong yet gentle, compassionate and always willing to support those around him. His ability to include everyone is indicative of his friendly nature and there will be a large hole left in the community with his passing."

RM Scott Summers, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (383)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Crawley, Sussex

Died: 21 February 2007

Location: Helmand

Incident: Driving in a convoy when an accident happened on 4 February. He was flown back to the UK, where he died

His CO Lt Col Matt Holmes: “It was typical of the man that he had volunteered for the task when the accident occurred. Marine Summers had a great sense of humour and fun, which he used to boost the morale of his friends and colleagues, even at the most difficult moments including when under enemy fire. He was selfless to the end, always willing to take on extra tasks for the good of his friends and colleagues. Brave, determined and professional in battle, to which he had courageously returned time and time again, he had proven his mettle on operations in Helmand.”

Flt Lt Steve Swarbrick, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (384)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF - 120 Squadron

From: Liverpool

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His mother Pamela: “I worried about him, the same way I had worried over him since he was a baby. But it’s what he wanted to do and I respected that. He didn’t want an office job with a nine-to-five routine, that wasn’t Steven. He wanted adventure and camaraderie. He loved coming home to recharge his batteries. He was an avid reader and he was seriously intelligent with a winning smile. I just miss him so much.”

Gds Michael Sweeney, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (385)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Coldstream Guards

From: Blyth, Northumberland

Died: 01 April 2010

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Trod on a hidden bomb while on foot patrol

His father Michael: "Michael was always smiling, always happy and always thinking of others. He was just turning from the boy into the man he was going to be! The world will be poorer a place without him in it. There are no prouder parents and brother than we are."

Kgn Ponipate Tagitaginimoce, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (386)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

From: Nausori, Fiji

Died: 15 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Shot while on security patrol

His widow: "A loving husband and a wonderful father who will be deeply missed. Love always, Laisani."

Lt Col Frazer Lawrence OBE, Commanding Officer 1st Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment: "Kingsman ‘Tagi’ Tagitaginimoce was an outstanding soldier and a great friend to many within the Battalion. He died during an attempt to aid one of his comrades. This comes as no surprise as he was an exceptional soldier whose first thought was always for those around him, never himself.

"He epitomised the qualities of a Fijian Kingsman - strong yet gentle, compassionate, principled and honourable, and with a real sense of right and wrong."

L/Cpl Sean Tansey, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (387)

Service: Army

Regiment: Life Guards

From: Washington, Tyne and Wear

Died: 12 August 2006

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed as he repaired a damaged tank

His friend and colleague Ben Scollick: "In 2002 there was a war raging every night on the D Squadron floor of the barracks. One individual had bought a battery-powered, fully-automatic MAC 10 BB machine gun and made it quite clear that all targets were fair game.

''One Sunday evening I had just arrived back at barracks and Tanz walks in with a big stupid grin on his chops. 'I've bought my BB guns back,' he said. Tanz's armoury had enough weapons to kit out all four lads in our room to a level where it became a 'non-target'. However, this did not make going to the ablutions any safer.

"I was brushing my teeth one evening when two lads came in armed with BB guns. Fortunately for me they were after whoever was in the shower. After a couple of seconds of giggling they picked the lock and opened the shower door. To their joint horror, Tanz was stood there, under the waterfall, naked as the day he was born, holding two Desert Eagle gas-powered BB canons. Tanz, in his best Darth Vader impression, uttered the iconic line: 'You underestimate the power of the dark side', while unloading said canons into the two lads foolish enough to cross him. For some reason they both felt it wise to drop to the ground and adopt the foetal position. With his extended magazines, Tanz made sure that no one would ever be targeted in the showers again. There are plenty of other stories that could have been told. This is one of the tamest but also one of my favourites. It truly was an honour to have had you in our lives. We miss you every day brother. I wrote this a short time after Sean's death:

Dreams

Like a Fish out of water,

Or a day without dawn.

I can't hear his laughter,

I'm so lost without Sean.

My life feels so empty,

I'm only a shell.

I'm living in torment,

I think I've found hell.

I stare at his photo,

And remember those days.

When carefree we stumbled,

Along life's rocky ways.

Be it a British city street,

Or an Iraqi desert road,

As brothers-in-arms,

We bravely strode.

It's all finished now,

The dream is well over.

Canada is history,

And I won't mention Dover!

Together till the end,

No questions asked.

Now all I have,

Are dreams of the past.

Forever mate."

L/Cpl Liam Tasker, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (388)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Army Veterinary Corps

From: Kirkcaldy, Fife

Died: 01 March 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Hit by enemy gunfire

His brother Ian: "Liam was the best brother, son, grandson and, indeed, friend you could ask for."

Sgt Luke Taylor, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (389)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: ???

From: Bournemouth, Hampshire

Died: 26 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Shot and killed at Lashkar Gah Main Operating Base by an Afghan National Army soldier

His Commanding Officer: "Physically robust, he was a great sportsman and always led from the front. And that is how I will remember him – a natural leader with inspirational flair who was devoted to his family."

L/Cpl Michael Taylor, 30

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (390)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Rhyl, Clwyd

Died: 22 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin district

Incident: Killed in a gun battle with insurgents

His partner Sonia Fleming: "Michael you were my soulmate, you were the best loving partner and dad anyone could have asked for. You lived to be a hero and died a hero. We are all extremely proud of you and always will be. Your legacy will live on through your three wonderful boys, who will aspire to be just like you."

RM Scott Taylor, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (391)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Buxton, Derbyshire

Died: 30 May 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His mother Jayne: "As soon as Scotty could walk, he wanted to climb. The more danger there was, the more smiles you would see on his face. Picnics by the river would require a spare set of clothes as he would often fall in while climbing on the rocks. He was quite simply fearless. He would run into the North Sea on an Easter visit to Whitby, when nobody else dared to venture in.

"He was mischievous, generous, and full of child-like fun, but he was also mature beyond his years. As a small child he listened intently to his father’s stories about being in the Royal Marines, and he knew from the very start that this is what he wanted to do when he grew up. His favourite subject at school was Physical Education – he trained hard, building up his endurance and his body for the path that he had chosen. When he passed out, he followed in the footsteps of his father and his big brother. We were so proud.

"His dedication in the gym earned him the nickname ‘Scotty the Back’. A fellow Marine once said that when he did a pull-up it looked like he was pulling the Earth down. Scotty loved tea almost as much as he loved exercise. Whether he was in northern England or southern Afghanistan, to Scotty a cup of tea was a cup of tea. Forty-degree heat just kept it hotter for longer.

"On the day Scotty was tragically killed, his brother, Liam, was flying out to begin a tour of duty. He arrived to be told the news of his death, and returned with his beloved brother four days later. We will miss his love and laughter always."

Sgt Matthew Telford, 37

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (392)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Died: 03 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Shin Kalay

Incident: Shot by an Afghan policeman in an unprovoked attack, along with five other British soldiers

His wife Kerry: "I loved Matt’s sense of humour as he was very laidback, he made everyone laugh with his jokes and stories. I felt very protected and safe with him as my husband. He absolutely loved Manchester United and would go to games as much as he could, but once we had our son, Harry, his time was spent more with us. 'Harry was only four at the time Matt died and was just starting to take an interest in football. I have tried to step into the role, and Harry carries on supporting Manchester United.

"I have two favourite memories of Matt – our beautiful wedding on the beach in Mexico and the birth of our son. I can’t really put into words the impact his death has had, as it turned our lives upside-down. Harry didn’t understand – he still thought his Daddy would come home, so that was very difficult. We got through it as we had each other. We have our photographs, home filming and lots of memories. We talk about Matt all the time as I always tell Harry how proud his Dad would be of him."

Scartho Park, a street in Grimsby, was last year renamed as Matthew Telford Park and a plaque has been unveiled as a memorial. Mrs Telford said: "I was happy to agree to the road naming as Harry and I live on the development so we drive past every day. Seeing his name there makes us smile and feel proud his name will be there forever."

Cpl Michael John Thacker, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (393)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Welsh Fusilliers

From: Coventry, West Midlands

Died: 01 June 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Shot while on duty at observation post Tir

His widow Catherine: "Michael was the love of my life. He was an amazing husband and father who will always be remembered as a funny, loving and kind man. Everyone who met Mike instantly liked him and through time came to love him."

His brother Cpl Matthew Thacker: "Cpl Michael Thacker is my big brother and the best I could wish for. We were more than brothers, we were best friends and words cannot express how much he will be missed. Michael is one of those people who would help others before helping himself. He will be leaving behind his beautiful daughter, Millie, and his wife Catherine. Michael could light up a dark room, always making people laugh because of his great personality. Devastated cannot come close to how we as a family are feeling. He died doing the job that we Thacker brothers love. He is a true hero."

Rfn Cyrus Thatcher, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (394)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Reading, Berkshire

Died: 02 June 2009

Location: Helmand, Near Gereshk

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on patrol

His family: "'Remember - do not mourn my death as hard as this will seem but celebrate a great life that has had its ups and downs - I love you all more than you would ever know.' These are some of the words written by our son Rfn Cyrus Thatcher aged 19, who was killed by an IED on June 2, 2009, in a letter he left, unbeknown to us, only to be read in event of his death.

"Where have these last five-and-a-half years gone? Oh, how we have tried and wish we could celebrate that ‘great life’ but as a family it has been impossible to do so when you spend the first year in complete shock, the second year with the knowledge that this is now a reality, the third year trying to accept this reality and the fourth and fifth years still wondering what on earth has happened to our lives, knowing every subsequent day is another day since we last saw his blue eyes, heard his infectious laugh and held him in our arms.

"He was an incredible young man who it turned out was born to be a soldier and what he amounted to in his short life leaves us wondering what he could have achieved had that life not been cut short. It is an agony we, as parents, face on a daily basis watching his brothers living on without him to share their lives. Zac, now 27, still feels the guilt of not being able to protect his younger brother and Steely, now 23, had to face the day he became older than his older brother.

"We will always have three sons who we are equally proud of and love with all our hearts, although there is one who consumes us because he is no longer here and the last sentence of his last letter will forever echo in our heads: 'I wish you all the best with your dreams. Remember chin up, head down. Love Cyrus.'"

WO2 Leonard Perran Thomas, 44

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (395)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Corps of Signals

From: Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire

Died: 01 July 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an Afghan policeman

His family: "Pez was a military man through and through. He thrived in extreme environments, both in the military and in his spare time. He was a keen climber and mountaineer and will be sorely missed by everyone who had the privilege to have met him."

Cpl Matthew Thomas, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (396)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

From: Swansea

Died: 25 September 2010

Location: Helmand, Garmsir district

Incident: Died after his vehicle was struck by a roadside bomb

His mother Beverly: "To his friends in Swansea he was known as 'Greeny', after I bought him a pair of green Dr Marten's boots. As a young boy he loved to play football, rugby and most other sports; ironically he would follow the Swans and spoke of what it would be like to watch them play in the Premier League (Swansea were promoted to the Premier League in 2011, less than a year after his death).

"Matthew was a very inquisitive boy and would often ask some bizarre questions, leaving his family confused and rolling around in laughter.

"It was in Matthew’s final years in school he began to talk about joining the Armed Forces, and after many discussions he opted for the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers in order to gain a trade for future years to come. As a soldier Matthew quickly gained a reputation for his high standards and natural leadership skills, soon moving up the ranks to become Corporal at such a young age.

"To us, his family, Matthew meant the world as he was considerate, happy-go-lucky and always had a smile on his face. He was full of energy and fun, and he lived life to the full. He would spend his time surrounded by his family and friends, of whom he was fiercely protective.

"I sat for hours, days, trying to find the words I could use to sum up Matthew and what he meant to me and to all who knew him. As his mum, no word exists that can describe my feelings of heartache, sadness or emptiness after losing my only child, but I try to take comfort in the face he made so many people happy in the short time he was with us."

L/Cpl Oliver Thomas, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (397)

Service: Army

Regiment: 3 Military Intelligence Battalion

From: Brecon, Powys

Died: 26 April 2014

Location: Kandahar, Takhta Pul district

Incident: Died in a helicopter crash

Roger Williams CBE MP, for whom L/Cpl Thomas worked as a researcher. "The loss of L/Cpl Oliver Thomas was a huge blow to his family, friends and the Intelligence Corps. He was a Reservist who really enjoyed his commitment to the British Army and was exposed to all the dangers experienced by full-time soldiers. The country will need more men and women like Oliver to deliver the defence requirement of this country so the MOD should ensure that they and their families are fully supported.”

His girlfriend Laura McLeod: “I had met my match when I found Oliver. The kindest and most wonderful person I know, we were very in love, with so many plans for the future. We enjoyed every moment we shared together. As my best friend and partner, I am so proud of him and he will forever be my favourite soldier. We will all miss him terribly.”

SAC Gary Thompson, 51

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (398)

Service: RAF

Regiment: Royal Auxiliary Air Force Regiment

From: Nottingham

Died: 13 April 2008

Location: Kandahar

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on patrol

His widow Jaqueline: "When I met Gary I was only 21. The effect he had on me was so strong that when he asked me out for a drink I automatically said no. I was so overwhelmed. I had never felt anything like that before. Growing up with him and growing older with him, he moulded me and my girls into the people we are today. He was incredibly giving. He would much rather give than receive. Every Christmas, he would love to watch people get their presents, but he was really embarrassed when it came to opening his own. Even in his civilian life, when he was running his business, he led from the front and wouldn’t ask others to do anything he wouldn’t do himself. He had an incredibly strong, quiet nature. He was incredibly calm. The only time I have ever felt vulnerable was when I lost Gary. He had always made me feel so safe, immensely loved and protected. Together, I felt we could deal with anything."

Tpr James Thompson, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (399)

Service: Army

Regiment: 23 SAS (V)

From: Whitley Bay, Tyne and Wear

Died: 19 May 2008

Location: Helmand, Musa Qala

Incident: Killed in a blast while on foot patrol

His mother Hilary: "I suppose the thing that sticks out is always his sense of humour. It just carried the family on so many occasions. It’s something he was born with and was there from when he was a small boy. It could be outrageous, sometimes. He was a very good joke teller, one of those people who can remember jokes whatever.His friends told a story at his funeral that when several of them were coming back from a night out James said that they needed a zebra crossing to cross the road to where they were staying. So he went and got a pot of black paint and one of white and painted one. It was still there until recently.

His brother Neil: "While he had a mischievous side he was also a member of an elite Regiment and a consummate professional. He loved his job and, from speaking to his patrol after he died, they assured me of his utter devotion and focus to whatever task they were carrying out. James was one of those people who lived life to the maximum, he constantly strived to push his own limits but did so with humour and dignity. He travelled extensively, I don't know how he had time to fit in all of the things he achieved. As a family we were hit pretty hard by James's death. I believe the stress of it was a huge influence on my father developing cancer. He died nine months after James."

Cpl Stephen Thompson, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (400)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Bovey Tracey, Devon

Died: 07 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His family: "Stephen was the sort of boy who would always look out for his brother and sisters. We remember one time when on holiday in Germany by a river having a picnic. Stephen was about 11 years old. His younger sister fell into the water and was caught by the current and Stephen, without any hesitation, dived in to save her. His caring nature extended to training new recruits. We heard later that he was the one the lads felt was the most approachable if they had any problems. He is still greatly missed by all the family."

Lt Col Rupert Thorneloe, 39

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (401)

Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Kirtlington, Oxfordshire

Died: 01 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Killed when an IED was detonated under his Viking armoured vehicle

When Lt Col Thorneloe died in July 2009, he became the most senior British officer to be killed in action since the Falklands War. His father John: "In my day a chap who commanded a Regiment was in the background, making decisions, but I’m afraid my son had a different attitude and felt he must show he was prepared to take the same risks as the soldiers he was giving orders to. You could say he died unnecessarily, but that was his whole attitude to life - don’t ask people to do things you’re not prepared to do yourself. I’ve learned more about him since he was killed than I ever knew before. He was someone you had to drag things out of. I remember one day I was sitting watching television with him and General Dannatt appeared, and I asked him if he had ever met him. He said, ‘Yes, I had lunch with him yesterday.’ I’ve learned from the soldiers who were with him that they more or less worshipped him as a Commanding Officer because he would sweep the floor to show he could sweep it just as well as anyone else. People have said that had he survived he would have been a General and probably would have commanded the defence forces. Time is a great healer but I’m looking at my office wall, with pictures of him on it, and he is just not there. He left a great gap, especially for his wife and children. One of our favourite pictures is of him sitting against a wall in Afghanistan with a bottle of water. He was under fire at the time and was taking shelter, but when his daughter Hannah saw it, she said: ‘There’s Daddy having a picnic’."

Lt John Thornton, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (402)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Ferndown, Dorset

Died: 30 March 2008

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on patrol

His elder brother Capt Ian Thornton: "John was younger than me, but I always looked up to him for advice. He had a very wise head on his shoulders for someone so young. He had an ability to put things in perspective. Just before he was killed I had joined the military and anything I had concern about he would put it into perspective. He would say: ‘Try not to worry about things, they will turn out for the best.' When he died we were overwhelmed by the outpouring of emotion from people we had never come into contact with, telling us how he had influenced them. People found they had made life-changing decisions based on a small piece of advice he had given. That advice given while he was alive carried on after he died. We met one girl who had become a singer after he said she should follow her dreams. It was a gift really, it was effortless. In his life, his philosophy was not to waste a single day."

Pte Matthew Thornton, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (403)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Barnsley, Yorkshire

Died: 09 November 2011

Location: Helmand, Babaji

Incident: Killed by an IED while on patrol

Capt Stephen Dando: "Matthew was a cracking soldier who gave 100 per cent.

His father Mick, mother Susan, brother Nathan and sister Sarah: "Matthew was proud to be part of the Yorkshire Regiment and he carried out his duties with the utmost professionalism. He was dedicated to serving his country as a soldier and believed they were making a difference. He loved what he was doing. He loved life and lived it to the full – in his work, in his role with the Territorial Army and in his leisure time. His death leaves a huge hole in our lives.''

Cpl Peter Thorpe, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (404)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Corps of Signals

From: Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria

Died: 01 July 2006

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed when an RPG hit government compound

His mother Karen Cargan: "Peter was a born leader from the start, being the eldest of four siblings. He never needed much guidance in life and was determined to achieve success in anything he did from a young age. He was a talented footballer who loved a kick around with his brother and mates and was in a local junior team. He was also gifted at drawing; he initially aimed to be a graphic designer, until one day he decided otherwise and announced that he wanted to join the Army.

"We waved him off at the train station in August 1995, a young naive 16-year-old boy, only for him to return as a confident young man 12 weeks later after completing basic training. He went on to train as an Signaller (Radio Operator) at the Army Apprentice College, Harrogate. Peter went on to complete his communications training at Royal School of Signals, Blandford, Dorset. He was then posted to 216 Parachute Signal Squadron, 5th Airborne Brigade to train as a Paratrooper. This was his proudest achievement, earning his maroon beret and gaining his wings.

"He was a consummate professional, but enjoyed nothing more than letting his hair down with his colleagues and friends, and was the life and soul of many a party! He had served in a variety of places, including a tour of Northern Ireland and was on his second tour of Afghanistan, acting as a Patrol Commander. He had been selected for promotion to Sergeant, but sadly we never got to see him proudly sporting his stripes. Peter was posthumously awarded this rank. He is deeply missed by all his family and friends and is remembered with great love and pride each and every day."

Pte John Thrumble, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (405)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Anglian Regiment

From: Chelmsford, Essex

Died: 23 August 2007

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: One of three killed when US F15 providing air support to ground troops dropped bomb

His Platoon Sgt ‘Woody’ Woodrow: "Pte ‘Mumbles’ was a true character within the platoon, with a great outlook on life. He was a real team player with a heart of gold. We will miss him deeply and he will never be forgotten."

Sgt Gareth Thursby, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (406)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Skipton, North Yorkshire

Died: 15 September 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Shot by a man wearing local Afghan police uniform

His widow Louise: "Gareth was the love of my life. He was an amazing husband and father, happy, full of life and kind hearted with a passion for his work and family. He was brave, hardworking, and devoted to his children. Our Hero."

Rfn Aminiasi Toge, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (407)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Fiji, Fiji

Died: 16 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on foot patrol three days before his 27th birthday

His mother Saimimere: "My boy was the pride of our home. Everybody loved him. I never thought about him dying. He used to phone about three times a week. A couple of days before he died he told me, 'Pray for me, Mama – it’s very bad here, very dangerous.' He didn’t sound frightened. We were so proud of him, although it was hard to imagine him fighting. He was such a gentle boy. I wanted him to join the Army because he wanted that and we thought our hearts would burst with joy when he was accepted."

Rfn Sovita Turagabeci and Rfn Jotame Tagicakibau, Fijian brothers and fellow Riflemen: "Rfn Aminiasi Toge was a true Christian by his belief and his actions. He loved to help people and was like an older brother to Fijians joining the Battalion, ready to put an arm around them and give them advice. He loved socialising and was friendly to everyone. He was always laughing and making the people around him laugh. He loved his job and of course he loved rugby, which he played fast and hard. We are certain that his family will miss him very much. Rfn Toge will also be missed by many people in the Battalion, every Fijian amongst them, including us. We called each other Naita, a Fijian greeting showing respect and friendship for each other and for Rfn Toge’s home province Kadavu and ours Lomaiviti. Aminiasi, you were a hero, see you in heaven. Moce mada Naita.”

SAC Ryan Tomlin, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (408)

Service: RAF

Regiment: RAF Regiment

From: Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

Died: 13 February 2012

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Shot dead during an insurgent attack while on a routine patrol

His father Kevin Tomlin: “Ryan knew what he wanted to do in life probably from the age of six or seven. He spent a short time as a Sea Cadet, went out on a boat for a week and said, ‘I’m not doing that anymore!’ But it was always going to be the Army or Air Force. My dad was in the RAF regiment and I think from then he knew what he was going to do.

“He was always happy, and in later life he was always smiling. He was very outgoing, loved the ladies, loved a drink and loved his car. It’s a job to describe him because there was a side of him that we never knew about when he was in the Forces, but when we spoke to all his friends they all said he was fearless. He was always the first one to say ‘come on then, let’s get going, what are we all sitting around moping for?’ He was pretty highly thought of by everybody and he was always very adventurous. One of the quotes he liked was: 'If you're not living life on the edge, then you're taking up too much room.'”

Ryan’s friend, SAC Pete Buckland, RAF Regiment: “Ryan was an amazing soldier and a even better friend, not a day goes by where I don’t think of him. He is truly missed and will never be forgotten. Shortly after his death I wrote this poem, which I had tattooed:

On the battlefield is where you fell,

A heroic story your legend will tell,

A man so heroic, strong and bold,

We share a brotherhood that will never grow old,

You always thought with honour and pride,

I felt so honoured to fight by your side,

A hero of war you’ll forever be,

My brother, my friend, rest peacefully.”

Capt James Townley, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (409)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Glastonbury, Somerset

Died: 21 September 2012

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali district

Incident: Died from gunshot wounds to the head at Forward Operating Base Shawqat. The coroner recorded a narrative verdict, ruling that the circumstances of the shooting remain "undetermined"

His father Peter: "We will never get over the loss of James but he lives on in the hearts of all those whose lives he touched."

Gdsmn Apete Tuisovurua, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (410)

Service: Army

Regiment: Welsh Guards

From: Fiji, Fiji

Died: 01 July 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by an Afghan policeman

His Commanding Officer Lt Col Dino Bossi: "One of Nature’s true gentlemen, he had a deeply moral outlook on life and enduring principles by which he lived. He was extremely fit and robust but without show or arrogance. Everybody liked him – one could not fail to – and his infectious smile broke down barriers wherever he went."

Pte Brian Tunnicliffe, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (411)

Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment Worcesters and Foresters

From: Ilkeston, Derbyshire

Died: 20 September 2007

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Died during a re-supply mission when his vehicle came off the road and overturned

Capt Richard Slaney, Quarter Master (Technical): "Never afraid of hard work, Pte Tunnicliffe would always get stuck in and offer a lending hand no matter what the task. He had two sides; on one side he was as strong as an ox, he could dig a trench and have brews on in no time. On the other side he loved baking cakes which he would proudly share with the lads, quite clearly he was very popular within the motor transport platoon. A real lively character who was full of chat, he will be truly missed."

Lt Neal Turkington, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (412)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Gurkha Rifles

From: Craigavon, County Armagh

Died: 13 July 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed alongside two other British soldiers by an Afghan soldier

His family: "Neal was jovial, kind, considerate and loyal to his family and friends. Our family were inspired by his presence, and generosity."

Rfn Mark Turner, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (413)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Gateshead, Tyne and Wear

Died: 04 April 2010

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Killed by an IED while on foot patrol

His brother David Ridley: "His beaming smile dazzled all while his contagious sense of humour rightened dark days in the desert of Afghanistan. Rifleman Mark 'Turtle' Turner was responsible for discovering roadside bombs and saved more than 30 of his comrades but 'the most dangerous job in the British Army' ultimately claimed his own life.

"Mark was one of five children, He was a mammy's boy at heart, always generous with cuddles as well as money, often sending home some of his wages to help out. He was an avid Newcastle fan and a keen sportsman winning trophies for snooker, high jump and long jump. Mark loved the Army, joining at age 17 and serving almost five years. He was praised for his bravery and courage and was going to be Lance Corporal. He loved the travelling, the adventures and challenges that the Army life gave him and enjoyed his life to the full. He was a brave young man and a heroic soldier who will forever be remembered for his sacrifice."

A L/Cpl Paul Upton, 31

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (414)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Looe, Cornwall

Died: 25 February 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed when his vehicle was struck by an IED

His brother Leon Upton: "Growing up into a military-orientated family, living in Cyprus, Germany - to name a few postings - it was inevitable that Paul and I would end up joining the Army. We were very close and together joined our local Cadet force. In 1996, I decided to take the plunge and joined my local regiment The Royal Gloucester Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment, closely followed by Paul. We were deployed on numerous operational tours together, to Northern Ireland and Kosovo. On returning, Paul decided to hang up his boots and got out, but the love for Army life was still there and he returned to Kosovo as part of the Reserves. I would often call round and he was always quizzing me on my movements. In 2007, Paul decided to give it another try and joined my regiment again, this time we had amalgamated to form The 1st Battalion The Rifles. I had already completed one tour of Afghanistan and this would become Paul's first in 2008 to 2009. Being deployed together again was great and as friends have commented, when Paul rejoined 'it was as if he had never left the Army all those years ago'.My family have come to terms with what happened on that dreadful day in 2009 and we all agree when we say 'he died doing what he loved'. He is always in our hearts and missed by all that knew him, especially Mum Tina, Dad Peter, stepdad Tony, stepmum Julie, sister Samantha, brother Peter, and his two nephews Callum-Paul and Harrison who he never got to meet. Swift and Bold. Once a Rifleman, always a Rifleman."

WO2 Sean Upton, 35

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (415)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: Nottinghamshire

Died: 27 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on foot patrol

Lt Col John Musgrave, Commanding Officer 5th Regiment Royal Artillery: "A role model to all he met and worked with; always living and working to the highest standards, but also always with a smile on his face and a ready laugh."

Sgt Simon Valentine, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (416)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

From: Bedworth, Warwickshire

Died: 15 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Died following an explosion while on a foot patrol.

His mother Carol: "Some of his closest mates said he was the most perfectionist person you could ever share a room with. You felt guilty if you put a towel down: he wanted everything absolutely tidy and orderly. He was a joy when he came back on leave: there was no ironing left lying around. He couldn't stand the sight of it!"

Pte Joseva Vatubua, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (417)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Royal Regiment of Scotland

From: Suva, Fiji

Died: 01 January 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed by bomb hidden in a wall while targeting enemy positions

His sister Maureen Vatubua: "My brother always wanted to join the Army, but he went so he could support his family and his daughter back in Fiji financially. The last time I saw him was in 2007, after that we just spoke on the phone. I’ll always remember his smile, his laughter, and his love of sports. He was always playing and training, every afternoon. He would play netball, rugby, volleyball, anything really, he just loved training. Once he was in the Army, I heard he became very good at rugby. He was one of the stars of the battalion team and represented the entire army at rugby sevens. I never saw him play but I saw pictures of him in the Fiji Times, the local newspaper, and I think he could have had a big future as a rugby player. Joseva was such a happy person, who loved mixing with his friends and family members. He’s the only boy in the family so we are all so proud of him. I miss my dear brother’s smiling face, his laughter, his jokes, and most of all his kind heart."

L/Cpl Ivano 'Sean' Violino, 29

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (418)

Service: Army

Regiment: Engineer Regiment

From: Maidstone, Kent

Died: 17 September 2007

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Died in an explosion while commanding a vehicle in convoy

His widow Katey: "Sean loved the Army in every way. He was really into his fitness and enjoyed taking part in all the sporting challenges he could. He did the Devizes to Westminster canoe challenge a number of times and especially enjoyed being chased by a crazy swan en route. He also joined the rugby team, which I always thought was strange as he was a small-built man, but he said he enjoyed the buzz and hoped that by running fast enough no one would catch him. The social side was also really important to him; he would never turn down a night out with friends and, of course, a drink of port! He never turned down an invitation for anything. He was always enthusiastic about arranging days out and family get-togethers. Most weekends we were out and about having lunch with friends or family followed by a night on the town. He also had a strange love of ironing and would never be seen with a crease in his clothes. He loved walking the dogs and being in the countryside. He used to love getting involved in my job in a country park, helping out with all sorts from cleaning out the shire horses to working on a till taking money. He was always so chatty and warm and wanted to be everyone’s friend. He was regularly up and down the motorway visiting his mum, sisters and children. He always worried about them all and wanted to make sure they were all OK. We miss Sean every day but have comfort in knowing that he died doing something that he truly loved and was extremely important to him. Never forgotten and always in our hearts."

His colleague WO2 Kevin Rank RE: "Although seven years have passed, the memories of you are still as fresh today as they were then.You were one person I could always call my mate, my comrade, my brother. I still raise a glass to honour you and I will continue to do so until we meet again, until then I know you are always beside me when I need you - I am sure you were during my last Afghanistan tour."

Pte Daniel Wade, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (419)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Warrington, Cheshire

Died: 06 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah Durai

Incident: Killed when Warrior armoured vehicle was hit by an IED

His mother Lisa Billing: "Daniel was a caring, loveable lad who would do anything for anybody. I can boast about how proud I am. We had a very close relationship and he could tell me anything."

His fiancee Emma Hickman was pregnant with his daughter when he was deployed to Afghanistan and he died three months before she was born. She said: "Dan was so looking forward to being a daddy. He used to carry her scan picture with him under his body armour when he went out on patrol. He helped me choose her name – Lexie-Mai – and was so proud he was going to be a father."

L/Sgt David Walker, 36

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (420)

Service: Army

Regiment: Scots Guards

From: Glasgow, Lanarkshire

Died: 18 February 2010

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Shot fighting rebels

His brother Patrick: "Davey had the heart of a lion. He was good to everybody he met and we all miss him terribly."

Spr Richard Walker, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (421)

Service: Army

Regiment: 28 Engineer Regiment

From: Leeds, West Yorkshire

Died: 07 January 2013

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Shot in an apparent "insider attack" by a member of Afghan National Army

His partner Abbie Revill: "He was very devoted to Lilly-Faith [his daughter, who was 18 months old when he died]. If you asked him to say one thing about himself, the first thing he would say is: 'I’ve got a daughter'. He was always talking about her.

"He found it very hard that he couldn’t come back much. He said: 'When I’m back from this tour, that’s it, I’m leaving the Army and spending the rest of my life with my daughter.' That was just before he passed away.

"He used to ring up to speak to Lilly-Faith every day when he was in Germany and every other day when he was in Afghanistan. He would do it on Skype so he could see her starting to crawl and the first time she said 'Dad'. I used to point the camera at her so he could see what she was like.

"He’d ask me how she was sleeping and whether she needed anything. He wanted to know every single thing. If she had a doctor’s appointment, he’d remember it the next week and ask how it had gone. That was amazing, because he had so much on his plate.

"We’ve made a memorial wall in her bedroom: there are two shelves full of his Army photos, pictures of them together and wooden ornaments he had made for her. She’ll say: 'That’s my Daddy, he’s in the sky'. There is a teddy bear he gave her with a recording of his voice, saying: 'To my little princess, Daddy loves you'. She presses that every now and again, so we’ve still got his voice."

Cpl Stephen Walker, 42

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (422)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Lisburn, County Antrim

Died: 21 May 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in a blast while on foot patrol

Lt Col Paul James RM, Commanding Officer 40 Commando Group: "Cpl Stephen ‘Whisky’ Walker, an ex-Navy chef turned Royal Marine Commando, was one of the most professionally astute men I have ever met. Brave, loyal, utterly dedicated and absolutely selfless, he died leading his section on patrol in southern Sangin. Having served 20 years in the Royal Marines, he was my most experienced and probably my best Corporal. I valued his counsel greatly and despite being his Commanding Officer, he taught me tactics. I often joined his section during our pre-deployment training. He was a natural leader who cared passionately for his men; he trained, he operated, he lived and he died at the front."

Major Sean Brady RM, Officer Commanding Alpha Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines: "I went out on patrol with him on a number of occasions in Afghanistan and was immensely impressed with how he led and protected the Marines under his command. On one occasion I vividly remember him physically stopping the lead man of his patrol with a wise hand on the shoulder just as the lead man was about to move through a trip wire. His actions undoubtedly saved the lives of the Marines in the patrol and this event just enhanced his already legendary reputation."

Cpl ‘Geese’ Ghessen RM, Fire Support Group, Alpha Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines: "Whisky was a larger-than-life character who brought humour to everyone he met, and a man that everyone looked up to. He was a proud family man who was also a proud brother of our Corps. He was always ready to speak his mind to better us all. When Whisky was around there was never a dull moment. As a leader you could not have asked for a better NCO, always leading from the front and at hand to share his knowledge and experiences to anyone who would listen. All of the Commando qualities are personified in Whisky who was proud to be a Royal Marine. He was a man that was always ready to stand up for his Marines and because of this he was admired by us all. As a father figure to many, he will be missed by Alpha Company and the Corps as a whole. Whisky was a 'True Bootneck'."

Cpl James Walters, 36

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (423)

Service: Army

Regiment: Air Corps

From: Leedstown, Cornwall

Died: 26 April 2014

Location: Kandahar, Takhta Pul district

Incident: Died in a helicopter crash

His Commanding Officer: “He never talked down to anyone. He was a beautiful bloke, a legend who will be massively missed."

His friend Olly Pryor: “Cpl James Walters, or ‘Bungle’ as he was known, was a hugely committed soldier who had served with distinction throughout the Army Air Corps. Respected and well-liked, he was always a mentor and friend to the less experienced members of the unit. Never afraid to face the challenges of operations in Afghanistan, he served with immense skill and bravery. A huge character, the loss of Bungle has devastated the Squadron and our thoughts and prayers are with his young family at this immensely sad time.”

RM Paul Warren, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (424)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 40 Commando

From: Preston, Lancashire

Died: 21 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin district

Incident: Killed by a blast when his patrol base was attacked by insurgents

His father Cliff Warren: "Time has not healed our loss and it never will. Every day is a struggle but our memories of you, son, make us cry and make us laugh - sometimes at the same time. Your smile and personality would light up a room and you were like the Pied Piper as kids would follow you around at any function we went to. You were our baby, and even though you turned out to be an outstanding son, Royal Marine and friend to many, you not being here to live a life that was rightly yours is something this country should never forget. We miss you so much, Paul xxxxx."

L/Cpl Paul Watkins, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (425)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Lancers

From: Port Elizabeth, South Africa

Died: 16 July 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Fatally wounded by small arms fire while on patrol

His family: "Paul wanted to join the Army from a very young age. He was proud to be a soldier and was proud of what he was doing; he died doing a job that he loved. He was such a loving and caring son, grandson and brother. He will be very sadly missed by his family and friends who loved him dearly."

Spr David Watson, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (426)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Engineers

From: Tyne and Wear, Whickham

Died: 31 December 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Died following an IED blast

His mother Anne: "He was part of Whickham Fellside [a football team in Whickham, Tyne and Wear] from the age of 11 until 17. That was his big passion. That was a good group of friends. Every year in his memory they go down to his grave. Last year, four cars pulled up, full to capacity with all his friends. He was very popular.”

His father Mal: "He used to run a lot - he used to do 30-mile runs when he was 17 years old, just before he started his Army training. He was really into fitness and when he was home on leave from the Army, no matter what the weather, even if it was chucking it down with rain, on went his skimpy shorts and he was off for a run! He never missed a day. There are some big hills around here and he used to race the buses up the banks and he was on a par with them all the way up, even with his rucksack on his back with weights in.

"His loss has been tremendous. We just keep looking, expecting him to come through the door and drop his kit bags in the passageway. Sometimes we sit in the house and we feel his presence. On the day of his funeral there was unbelievably deep snow. The council cleared the roads between the house and the church and when the cortège passed by people were doffing their hats. You don’t see that much. It was nice to see. David had a favourite quote that he lived his life by. It was: ‘If you could not fail, what would you hope to achieve?'"

RM Richard Watson, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (427)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Caterham, Surrey

Died: 12 December 2006

Location: Helmand, Now Zad

Incident: Killed when his patrol came under attack from the Taliban

His mother Tania: "Richard was devoted to both his family and his military service. He lived for each moment and was fanatically enthusiastic throughout every single day of his short life. He died doing his duty, he died amongst his beloved comrades. He died fighting as a Royal Marine, he died with the love of his family within him.

"In or out of his uniform, Richard was and remains our hero; a loving son, dedicated brother and devoted boyfriend. He brought so much joy and happiness to our home, a home that now feels cold and empty without the warmth and love of a mother’s son.

''It is impossible to come to terms with the fact that such a wonderful human being is no longer here with us. He was the epicentre of our family existence and nothing will ever take his place; our lives can never be the same again."

L/Cpl Jamie Webb, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (428)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment Cheshire

From: Handforth, Cheshire

Died: 26 March 2013

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Died after being injured in an attack by insurgents

His brother Luke: "Jamie used to build us up when we were down, because it was mostly hospitals with our family. My Dad has been through a lot: he is diabetic and he had a heart attack. I have a serious heart condition, too. With Mum, we called ourselves 'the Four Musketeers'.

"When I was younger he'd come and visit after my operations in Birmingham: he and my Dad slept in the playroom. He’d always be there, joking around and making me laugh, dancing around to music. He used to play Ready 2 Rumble [a boxing video game] with the children on the ward, and then he would play it with the fathers, as well. He would beat them all. He’d always visit me after I’d had surgery – with food, and say: 'I’ll bring you home, Luke!'

"When he called up from Afghanistan he would ask Mum to put the phone near the budgie. He’d say: 'Can you get him to whistle?' JoJo, our budgie, wouldn’t whistle so I had to whistle down the phone, and Jamie would whistle back. When the soldiers came to visit us, they asked: “Mrs Webb, why would Jamie always whistle on the phone?”

"I spoke to him the morning he died: he was ready to come home. He had a laugh with me on the phone, asking how I was. He gave me his Mercian Regiment Bible once and said: 'Look after that'. I’ve kept that in my room and I always have his dogtags with me. I keep them close to my heart. We visit Jamie’s grave every day. We sing Happy Birthday to him and buy him birthday cakes. Life without him is just not the same. He was my best friend."


Cpl Terry Webster, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (429)

Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment

From: Chester, Cheshire

Died: 04 June 2010

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Killed in exchange of fire with insurgents

His family: "Tez was passionate, loyal and determined. He enjoyed the role he had in the Mercians but he was a family man at heart. He was a fantastic dad to Jess and Liam and he was the perfect soulmate to me. Although this is a very sad time, Tez would want us to be positive. Remember the good times, the happy times. A lot of people’s lives will be deeply affected by Tez’s all-too-early departure. Life will never be the same for us."

Cpl Nicholas Webster-Smith, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (430)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Military Police

From: Brackley, Northamptonshire

Died: 03 November 2009

Location: Helmand, Shin Kalay

Incident: Rogue' Afghan policeman shoots dead five British soldiers in unprovoked attack.

His family: "He was one of the most loving, generous, kind-hearted men you could meet. He always put others first."

Sgt Barry Weston, 40

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (431)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Reading, Berkshire

Died: 30 August 2011

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj district

Incident: Killed by a roadside bomb while on foot patrol

His father Roy: "Sport was a great thing in his life. We were so proud when he was asked to do the England trials. Unfortunately, when he was in the Marines, his rugby was curtailed because you do so much training there that there isn't the time to do much else. He put his career before his sport.

"He was a devoted father to his daughters, Jasmine, Poppy and Rose, who was born shortly before he died. In Afghanistan, he made a point of befriending the locals, and would talk to ordinary people such as farmers about their children and his own. His defining characteristics were modesty and commitment. He applied himself to everything he did – he would always persevere until he got there. He failed the initial fitness test to get into the Marines, but by the time it came round again, a year later, he made sure he passed. Yet he never boasted. Even his best friend didn't know he had played rugby at county level. But he achieved more in 40 years than many people do in a lifetime."

L/Cpl Ben Whatley, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (432)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Kings Lynn, Norfolk

Died: 24 December 2008

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali

Incident: Killed by enemy fire while on a mission

His family: "Ben was a vibrant, happy person who had an unbridled enthusiasm for life. He was so proud to be a Royal Marine; his death creates an irreplacable loss for all his family and friends."

Tpr Christopher Whiteside, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (433)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Light Dragoons

From: Blackpool, Lancashire

Died: 07 July 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by an IED while on an operation to clear the area of insurgents

His mother Diane: "It’s been five years now, and sometimes people think, 'It’s been five years, she’s OK now,' but you know it will never be OK. His Regiment have never let me down, though. They’ve been fantastic. They all wrote to me, they all remember him. They will all always remember him. When I visit them, I can feel him there. I think that he is still in Afghanistan sometimes. That is my way of coping. It is very odd watching the end of the Afghanistan war, because you feel like it isn’t finished, if you know what I mean. You have this feeling that after they have left, it will just go back to how it has always been, and that will mean that Christopher died for nothing. I have mixed feelings. I do wonder what it was all for. I was at home and my younger son said, 'There’s a man at the door. He’s wearing a uniform.' And you think, it’s one of his friends come to visit, and then he took his hat off, and you just know. The next morning I woke up and said to my partner, 'Was it a dream?' And he said, 'it wasn’t a dream'. He was 20, which is just no age to bury a son. I couldn’t watch the news afterwards because there were so many killed. But he died when he was his happiest. He used to say, 'I am living the dream.' He was happy-go-lucky. He loved the Army and it made him so happy. He died doing what he loved. Somehow that is better than being knocked down by a car. He went to a careers meeting when he was 12 and from then on, that is all he wanted. He was quiet, for a soldier, and he always had a huge smile. That is that I remember most, his smile. He was quiet, but he couldn’t do enough for you. He’d fallen in love the Christmas before too, which was lovely. His girlfriend has moved on now, which I am very glad about, but they were crazy about each other and I am so glad he had that. They said that he would never have known a thing either. It was like a light going out."

Pte Joe Whittaker, 20

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (434)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire

Died: 24 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in a blast while checking for mines

His mother Naomi: "Joe died tragically doing the job he loved. He was immensely proud to be in the Parachute Regiment, and volunteered for a tour of duty in Afghanistan before taking up his place at Sandhurst. His goal was to become a helicopter pilot in the Army Air Corps. Joe lived his life to the full, relished a challenge and gave everything 100 per cent. Joe died a Paratrooper, serving his country. We are so proud of him, miss him and love him always."

Gdsmn Karl Whittle, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (435)

Service: Army

Regiment: Grenadier Guards

From: Bristol

Died: 07 September 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Died in hospital in the UK after sustaining serious injuries in enemy action

Lt Col James Bowder, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards: "Guardsman Whittle was one of our very best. A great soldier and a young man of rare character, he was destined to go a very long way in the Army. Big, strong and full of fight, he battled hard against his injuries right to the very end. His loss has been keenly felt in a close battalion."

RM Jonathan Wigley, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (436)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire

Died: 05 December 2006

Location: Helmand, Garmsir

Incident: Coroner ruled that human error was partly to blame, after Marine Wigley was hit by gunfire from a US F-18 jet

His mother Sharon: "How do I begin to describe Jonathan? Intelligent, determined, focused, caring, with a natural ability to make everyone around him laugh. From an early age, Jonathan showed an aptitude for gymnastics and was a member of the East Midlands regional squad – until he discovered adventure! When flying with his father, Jonathan would complain that it wasn’t exciting enough and take the controls himself. I remember a particular camping expedition he planned with his friends. Being 15-year-old boys, they decided to call it ‘Operation Willy’. Jonathan said he was going to leave his sleeping bag at home so that he could ‘harden himself up’ for joining the Royal Marines. Whilst he was downstairs with his friends, I went to his room and, making his sleeping bag as small as I could, I stuffed it into the bottom of his rucksack. Satisfied that he wouldn’t spend the night freezing, I waved the lads off. Jonathan, of course, had anticipated what I would do and I later found the sleeping bag on his bed. He spent the night freezing, refusing offers of shared sleeping bags with his friends. Needless to say, he spent several days in bed feeling lousy afterwards and he was forced to admit he’d been ‘a bit of a prat'. The huge Jonathan-shaped hole he has left in everyone’s lives is indescribable. The jokes, the cheeky grin and the cry of ‘Oooh Matron!’ in a perfect imitation of Kenneth Williams are only a few of the things we miss. The fact that he did more in 21 years than many people do in a lifetime has been a huge inspiration to me and to many others who knew him."

Sharon has set up a charity, Shrapnel, to raise awareness of life-changing injuries suffered by members of the Armed Forces and fund equipment.

Rfn Daniel Wild, 19

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (437)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Rifles

From: Easington, County Durham

Died: 13 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed alongside Capt Mark Hale while trying to carry a wounded comrade, Lance-Bombardier Matthew Hatton, to safety. Received a posthumous Mention in Dispatches.

His mother Laura Laws: "Danny smiled at just everything. He would have a joke and a laugh. He was extremely fit and when he went jogging, he would load up his rucksack with my shopping and several bricks just to make himself stronger. I'm so proud of Danny, but I still think he was too young to go out there."

Pte Daniel Wilford, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (438)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

Died: 06 March 2012

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah Durai

Incident: Killed when Warrior armoured vehicle was hit by an IED

His aunt Susan Clarke: "He was always quiet as a boy, but from an early age, was very close to his grandparents and particularly his grandfather, Stanley. If asked who his best friend was it was, he would always say, his granddad. They had a lot of fun together and were always on the same team cheating when we played board games. They were terrible, the pair of them, swapping cards under the table, but would always share the prize at the end.

"Daniel idolised his grandparents. He would ring them up to ask if he could go and stay with them, even if they didn't have the internet or anything fancy like that. On Sundays, we would all go for walks in the park together, or play pitch and putt by the seaside. Stanley had been a soldier as well, and was so proud of Daniel when he signed up. We all were, but we were wary of the dangers. We would go up and visit him at Catterick Garrison and he would talk us through everything he was doing. He is sorely missed by all of us but his death has crucified his grandparents."

Sgt Dave Wilkinson, 33

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (439)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Artillery

From: Ashford, Kent

Died: 01 July 2007

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Killed when his patrol was attacked with small arms fire and RPGs

His colleague Sgt Dave Cooper: "I have known Dave for 13 years. What I’ll miss is his humour, the way he could turn any situation into something absurd, the way that he would take the mickey and produce sarcastic remarks, always at the right time. I’ll also miss his professionalism. He was down the line: he was annoyingly fit, his work was always meticulous and he knew his - and most other peoples’ - jobs inside out. Even when a task was laborious or seemingly pointless, Dave always gave 100 per cent. Secretly, I was jealous of him. I think we all were."

Pte Jason Williams, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (440)

Service: Army

Regiment: The Mercian Regiment

From: Worcester, Worcestershire

Died: 09 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk area

Incident: Killed by an IED blast as he tried to retrieve the corpse of an Afghan National Army solider

His mother Linda: "Jason's smile was like sunshine. His warmth radiated to everyone. I miss him every day of my life."

WO2 Michael Williams, 40

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (441)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

From: Cardiff

Died: 24 June 2008

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed in a firefight with Taliban

His great friend Sgt Maj Karl Mitchell: "I’ve known Michael for most of my military career - he was more commonly known to everyone as Mark or ‘Weasel’. I won’t go into how he gained the nickname. I think of him in two ways: Mark the soldier and Mark the friend.

"The soldier was one of the most professional men I’ve ever had the honour of working with. He was always meticulous in everything he did, whether that be soldiering or the mountains of paperwork that comes with the job as Company Sgt Maj. This would constantly be a subject we would moan about over a pint. Mark was the type of person that could not rest until everything was just right. He was more at home in the field than in the office.

"His knowledge of machine gunning held legendary status within the Battalion and the men he trained will carry on his legacy for many years to come. He was due a posting after the tour that would have seen him move closer to the Welsh Valleys, and his beloved Cardiff City Football Club - never have I met a stauncher fan.

"Mark the friend was more like a brother. He was generous to a fault, he would stop everything to help out in any way he could, and nothing was too much to ask. There were three of us that lived in each others pockets: Mark, myself and Sgt Lee Payne. It was a standing joke that wherever one was, the other two would not be far behind."

RM Joseph Windall, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (442)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: Royal Marines

From: Hazlemere, Buckinghamshire

Died: 02 September 2006

Location: Kandahar

Incident: One of 14 British personnel killed when Nimrod MR2 aircraft crashed. Fuel leak thought to be responsible

His mother Phillippa Young: "I had a conversation with him before he left, and he said that I should never change my views on the war, whatever happened to him out there. Joe supported the war, and I supported the war and him fighting it, so because he's died that doesn't change anything for me."

Cpl Danny Winter, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (443)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Stockport, Manchester

Died: 14 January 2009

Location: Helmand, Gereshk

Incident: Killed in an explosion while on a mission

His mother Carolyn Hughes: "Everybody dreads that knock on the door. I have some lovely messages of support from parents that have got boys in the Forces. It's just testament to what a lovely fellow he was and how much he's going to be missed.

"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun, and in the morning we will remember them. Loved and missed, Mum, Jez and Boys."

SAC Marcin Wojtak, 24

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (444)

Service: RAF

Regiment: Royal Air Force Regiment

From: Leicester

Died: 01 October 2009

Location: Helmand

Incident: Died in an explosion while on patrol near Camp Bastion

His mother Teresa Woods: "Marcin enjoyed simple things and everyone that met him saw him as being a gentle, kind-hearted person, always with a smile on his face. He had passion and dedication and he made people feel better about themselves. He lived to please people and nothing seemed to make him happier than making someone else smile. His family were ever-important to him.

"As a little boy it was so apparent that Marcin would go into the RAF. He turned furniture into mock planes, his brother Janek and sister Gosia would be his co pilots. Any object would be a gun. He loved watching films with Janek and his friend Joseph: Top Gun, Aliens and the TV show Sharpe were always favourites. He mastered the art of making mix CDs, I often received them with a variety of music, the first of these was called Mama’s Mix.

"However, his perceived lack of expertise on computers gave rise to his first nickname in 26 Squadron 'Bodge-tak'. Aptly; this nickname changed when ‘celebrating’ with his comrades he took off his Super Ted T-shirt and ‘flew’ around the quarters shouting 'Super Ted!'. Because of his warm, kind and approachable nature, they re-nicknamed him 'Big Ted'. The name stuck!

"Marcin’s military reports always said that he had leadership potential and as a family we knew he would achieve great things. We are enormously proud of his achievements in his short life of just 24 years and 11 months; four tours of Afghanistan and one of the Falklands in his four-and-a-half years in the RAF Regiment. He died as an Acting Corporal and he felt so honoured and priviledged to have been chosen for this role. Marcin’s name is recorded on many memorials, but seeing it on the wall of a new accommodation block at RAF Leeming was a real tribute to him.

"He loved seeing us all and our special family day became ‘Fish Friday’. He would sneak in to the house, pick me up, swing me around, plonk me on the work surface and say 'Tea?' That was our tall, handsome blue-eyed boy! Per Ardua."

WO2 Charlie Wood, 34

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (445)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Middlesborough

Died: 28 December 2010

Location: Helmand, Lakshar Gah

Incident: Killed in an explosion as he cleared a road of devices

His mother Barbara Nicholson: "Everybody who knew Charlie said he was a lovely lad: a joker, a gentleman and the most generous person you could ever meet. He wanted to be a fireman when he was young – he had a little fireman's helmet. But when he was 16, he told me he wanted to join the Army. We were so proud of him, knowing he was doing a job he loved. He lived and died for the Army. He called his soldiers 'the kids' and he treated them like his own. He was strict, but at Christmas he would arrange dinner for them and dress up as Father Christmas to keep their spirits up. He was always the joker; he loved life. One of the last times we saw him properly he was singing Crocodile Rock on the karaoke and tricking me into drinking sambuca while he was pretending with water. The last time I spoke to him was December 27, when he told me he loved me and to make sure I enjoyed myself. I said, 'I love you lots'. That was the last time we spoke.

"When he died, we were devastated. But he would say 'if anything happens to me, you've got to get on with life, you can't let it get you down'. Now, we talk about him every day. His niece has a teddy bear he bought her before he went to Afghanistan, which has a message from him recorded, so we can still hear his voice.

"I have an ornament of a head and hands in my garden, and whenever he used to visit he would turn the hands upside-down as a joke, to let me know he'd been. We've turned them around for good now, to show he's with us. Because he is. He'll always be with us. He had a heart that could melt the sun and he is still missed by all, especially his sisters Samantha and Amanda."

His wife Heather: "Charlie was a amazing man, soldier and husband. He had a wicked sense of humour and his presence would light up any room. He was very caring, thoughtful and believed that you could achieve anything in life if you put your mind to it. This was something that has stayed with me and been even more poignant since Charlie has passed. Charlie was a dedicated solider and throughout his career had a few hurdles that he needed to overcome but with his ethos of, if you put your mind to it you can achieve anything... he did. In February 2009, he was promoted to Sergeant Major, which was a dream come true for him; he worked so hard to get there and really deserved it, so much so, he went out and purchased himself a 50-inch TV for his self-recognition so that he could watch England play rugby that afternoon.

"His soldiers looked up to him as a father figure as well as a leader. Charlie also gave sound advice and would put himself in his soldiers shoes, nor would he ever ask someone to do something he was not prepared to do himself. Over the years Charlie did a lot for charity and raised thousands for the Army Benevolent Fund and Help for Heroes. This was something he was passionate about and always encouraged his younger soldiers to get involved with. Charlie was a brilliant husband and my best friend, we did everything together. We both worked hard during the week so we could really enjoy our weekends together, when he was not away. Charlie loved his holidays and we would try and get away a few times a year, however the sun did not like Charlie with his pale freckly skin, so he would either end up sunburnt or sat under a tree - bless him. We enjoyed socialising with our friends, going shopping, Charlie loved shopping which was a plus and even had a good eye for handbags. And some days we would just lie in bed eating pizza, chatting and watching trashy TV. Every moment together was perfect and we never got bored of each other's company.

"Losing Charlie was the most devastating thing in my life because I have lost my world. However, I now have a Guardian Angel who I know protects me and watches over me. I know how much Charlie loved me and he knew how much I loved him and I think of this each and every day. Charlie has given me courage and determination to carry on with life and keep his memory alive. With that, I ran the London Marathon in his memory and have since raised thousands of pounds for charity with Charlie's ethos in mind – that you can achieve anything in life if you put your mind to it.

I am a very proud Army wife and very proud to have been Charlie's wife – he will never be forgotten."

Pte Robert Wood, 28

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (446)

Service: Army

Regiment: Royal Logistic Corps

From: Marchwood, Hampshire

Died: 14 February 2011

Location: Helmand, Camp Bastion

Incident: Killed in a fire, not thought to be a result of enemy action

His mother Alison: "Rob is missed more than words can say, and no amount of time will take the hurt away. He was loved by so many people. He was a real Jack the Lad, up for anything, and we miss his huge presence in our lives. He lives on in his young son Noah, who is nearly four years old and so like his Daddy."

L/Cpl Jonathan Woodgate, 26

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (447)

Service: Army

Regiment: Household Cavalry Regiment

From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk

Died: 26 March 2010

Location: Helmand, Sangin

Incident: Killed by a grenade thrown from behind a wall while on foot patrol

His father Tony: "After Jo’s death, one of his friends summed him up. He said that Jo was a 'Rockstar in Uniform' - and that is actually on his gravestone. He had all the gear but was also quiet and modest.

"I always said to him 'What’s been happening?' And he’d say, 'Stuff Dad, just stuff', which apparently is what a lot of the lads would say, just to stop the parents worrying – as if it did. But, if we knew all the things we’d have probably worried more.

"My wife is going to do a walk from Lyneham to Lavenham next year in Jo’s name for Help for Heroes. Lyneham to Lavenham was Jo’s last trip.There’s a plaque in the market place at Lavenham – that’s going to be the end.

"My greatest regret was that I didn’t actually know him. The friends that he made in the Army, all the things that they have all said about him since, well, he was a bloody hero. And I didn’t know it."


Pte Damian Wright, 23

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (448)

Service: Army

Regiment: Mercian Regiment Worcesters and Foresters

From: Mansfield, Nottinghamshire

Died: 05 September 2007

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Caught by an IED during fighting with Taliban

His colleague Pte Jack Hawksley: "Wright was a loyal friend whose lively nature shone through everything he did. His son Josh was the light of his life and his fatherly role within the platoon will be missed. He was a constant source of advice for all newcomers and his lack of expressed opinion will leave a void for us all."

RM Gary Wright, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (449)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 45 Commando

From: Blanefield, Stirlingshire

Died: 19 October 2006

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Died following attack on military convoy

His sister Karen on behalf of the family: "Gary wanted to be a Royal Marine from around the age of 12 – only the elite force would do. He was always full of adventure, climbing high trees, trekking through forests and over moorlands – while still at school he even went to the jungles of Bolivia on a world challenge! His cheeky, happy-go-lucky character always shone through.

''He very much ‘lived the dream’ by passing out with his green beret in July 2003. This was despite having been very ill with glandular fever four weeks into training, allied to a life-threatening throat infection which saw him ‘blue-lighted’ to hospital. After that, he was really upset when one of his instructors repeatedly told him that he was going to make sure that he failed, but Gary’s determination to succeed was the winning factor. At his passing out parade he was introduced as the man with the smallest and tightest T-shirts around – all to show off his six-pack! We remember him subsequently saying he could not believe he was getting paid for what he did – despite the pitiful low salary of our Armed Forces heroes. He had an infectious personality and a wide circle of friends.

''One of Gary’s favourite schemes to earn him free drinks when out in company was to say to a girl 'I’ve got your name tattooed on my bum'. Eventually – after he had got his drink – he would prove to the girl concerned that he did indeed have ‘your name’ in the form of a tattoo on his rear end! He even shocked his 93-year-old Gran with that one!

''Things in life were only really important to Gary if there was a laugh or an adventure involved – he tended to gloss over everything else. On one occasion when I was ill in hospital, he arrived to visit me and after a while said to his Dad, 'By the way, some woman phoned to say you had won a holiday in a competition'. When pressed for more information, he added that 'it was in Balmaha or Bahamas or somewhere like that'. The difference between a small Loch Lomond village and the Caribbean was not of any significance to Gary!

''When away on one of his tours, our Mum waited with baited breath to get her first ‘bluey’ – Gary was never a great writer. Eventually, after several weeks, it arrived. She excitedly opened it, desperate to hear he was OK and missing everyone, only to find a cheque inside. The wording of the letter was short and sweet: 'Can you pay this into the bank Mother, please. Cheers, Gary!'

''Whenever Gary’s name comes up in conversation, it always raises a smile – that is the type of person he was. ‘Remembered with a smile’ is etched on his headstone as testament to his character."

RM James Wright, 22

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (450)

Service: Royal Marines

Regiment: 42 Commando

From: Weymouth, Dorset

Died: 05 August 2011

Location: Helmand, Nad Ali district

Incident: Killed by a grenade after an attack by insurgents while on foot patrol

His father David: "James was Mr Morale-Booster in the Marines. He was very outgoing, and was known as 'Smiler' because he was always grinning. His friends relied on him for morale. In some ways I was very envious of the fun he had in the Marines. He never stood still – he gave everything 100 per cent – but there was more to him than just being a Marine. He grabbed things in life; he'd give things a go even if they weren't necessarily his passion. When he and his girlfriend, Shelley Robertson, went to the Canaries, for instance, she wanted to go diving, while he wasn't initially bothered, but he tried it and was hooked.

"Shelley gave birth to his daughter Lily four months after he died. She's just like her dad – cheeky, funny and a daredevil.

"When I lost James, I lost my best friend, because we did so much together – motorbiking, mountain biking, kayaking, the gym – we were quite competitive. After he died, his friends had a shock, realising how much he achieved. On his headstone we had: 'A true jester – everyone was so engaged by his smile'."


Cpl Mark Wright, 27

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (451)

Service: Army

Regiment: Parachute Regiment

Medals / Military Awards: George Cross

From: Edinburgh

Died: 06 September 2006

Location: Helmand, Kajaki

Incident: Died as he was protecting a comrade when his patrol got trapped and a rescue helicopter set off a mine

His parents Jem and Bob: "Mark was a happy-go-lucky lad who always had a smile on his face. He had time for everyone he met and ultimately fulfilled his dream to become a Para. When he was four years old, he said he wanted to join the 'narmy'. Mark’s uncle joined 3 PARA and then the SAS when Mark was six years old. We used to visit him in Hereford as a family and Mark used to visit the camp with his uncle. Mark had an adventurous spirit and used to love going away with the army cadets at weekends. When he joined 3 PARA, he used to travel up from Colchester every weekend; he would come back with a huge bag of washing. Once, when I was doing the ironing, I noticed other names on the clothing. I questioned Mark and he replied, with a big smile on his face, that the washing machine in the barracks had broken. I had to laugh. We miss Mark’s smiley face every day and his sense of humour that always lit up a room when he walked into it. He was a loyal, brave and fun-loving friend and a true gentleman. We talk about him every day, but it won’t be hard to keep his memory alive. There is a film about his time in Afghanistan just released, Kajaki, which I am sure will keep Mark’s name alive for years to come."

Dmr Thomas Wright, 21

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (452)

Service: Army

Regiment: Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters

From: Ripley, Derbyshire

Died: 24 June 2007

Location: Helmand, Lashkar Gah

Incident: Part of a group surveying a site for a new road project when his vehicle caught in explosion

His CO Lt Col Richard Westley MC: "Drummer Wright was part of a patrol that was delivering civil and military aid to needy people in remote districts when he was killed. He was a talented young soldier who was an accomplished musician, a determined boxer and, first and foremost, one of my fighting men. The tragedy is deepened in that he was killed by people from an area that he and his colleagues were protecting and developing, through the provision of security and reconstruction. His courage and professionalism serve as a reminder of the commitment of young soldiers across Afghanistan, who set a fine example to the armies of the world and to whom society owes a huge debt. 'Wrighty’ died in the service of his country, defending a foreign land with vigour, valour and vigilance and it is a terrible blow to us all that he will not make the trip home with us. My sincere condolences go to his family, girlfriend and his many friends in the Battalion. This is a dreadful loss."

Pte Thomas Wroe, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (453)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Holmfirth, West Yorkshire

Died: 15 September 2012

Location: Helmand, Nahr-e Saraj

Incident: Shot by a man wearing local Afghan police uniform

His sister Demi: "You are my brother, my inspiration, my hero, my role model, my life."

Pte Johnathon Young, 18

We will remember them - Afghanistan 2001—2014 (454)

Service: Army

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

From: Hull, East Yorkshire

Died: 20 August 2009

Location: Helmand, Sangin area

Incident: Killed by an explosion while on routine foot patrol

(Video) Inside The Twin Towers When Plane Hits

His childhood friend and fellow soldier, Sam Williams: "Johnny was famous for what he called his chicken dance. Which he couldn’t do. Arms all over the place, legs everywhere and all. Didn’t stop him from getting on the dancefloor, mind.”

Pte Young's regimental colleagues signed two T-shirts and presented them to his family on the day of his funeral. Pte Young’s mother Angie Fox: "Three years later, my partner Kevin rang me saying he had heard news of the deaths of five Yorkshire boys. When it came on the news what their names were, my other son, Carl - Johnathan’s brother - looked at his T-shirt. We realised one of them had signed his name. It just brought back awful memories. All you do is think of other families, other mothers, hearing the knock on the door."

FAQs

What did Churchill say about Afghanistan? ›

Churchill viewed them “as degraded a race as any on the fringe of humanity: fierce as a tiger, but less cleanly; as dangerous, not so graceful”. He blamed the Talibs for the Afghans' lamentable absence of civilised development, keeping them in the “grip of miserable superstition”.

Who won Afghanistan war 2001? ›

With al-Qaeda's help, the Taliban won control of over 90 percent of Afghan territory by the summer of 2001.

What was the outcome of the 2001 US invasion of Afghanistan? ›

The US and its allies rapidly drove the Taliban from power by December 17, 2001, and built military bases near major cities across the country. Most al-Qaeda and Taliban members were not captured, but escaped to neighboring Pakistan or retreated to rural or remote mountainous regions during the Battle of Tora Bora.

How many innocent lives were lost in Afghanistan? ›

Key Findings. As of September 2021, more than 70,000 Afghan and Pakistani civilians are estimated to have died as a direct result of the war.

Was Churchill in Afghanistan? ›

He never set foot in Afghanistan itself. Yet Churchill was a natural historian, and for all their imperial arrogance, his words carry unmistakable relevance to Afghanistan today.

What did Winston Churchill do? ›

Winston Churchill was an inspirational statesman, writer, orator and leader who led Britain to victory in the Second World War. He served as Conservative Prime Minister twice - from 1940 to 1945 (before being defeated in the 1945 general election by the Labour leader Clement Attlee) and from 1951 to 1955.

Is Afghanistan safe now? ›

You should not travel to Afghanistan. The security situation in Afghanistan remains extremely volatile. There is an ongoing and high threat of terrorist attacks through Afghanistan, including around the airport. Travel throughout Afghanistan is extremely dangerous, and border crossings may not be open.

Is Afghanistan still in war? ›

Violence across Afghanistan continued in 2020 and 2021 as the United States increased air strikes and raids targeting the Taliban. The Taliban, in turn, attacked Afghan government and ANDSF targets and made significant territorial gains.

Is Afghanistan still a country? ›

Afghanistan, officially the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, is a landlocked country located at the crossroads of Central Asia and South Asia.

Why did America lose Afghanistan? ›

Many believe it is because the military might of the United States has waned and its super-power status much eroded. Some claim it lost because of a lack of determination while others attribute it to the legendary fighting capabilities of the Afghans, who are supposedly indomitable.

Who won the Afghanistan war? ›

The 20-year-long conflict ultimately ended with the 2021 Taliban offensive, which overthrew the Islamic Republic and subsequently re-established the Islamic Emirate. It was the longest war in the military history of the United States, surpassing the length of the Vietnam War (1955–1975) by approximately six months.

What's Afghanistan like now? ›

Afghanistan has experienced momentous change since the Taliban took control nearly one year ago. There's food insecurity and economic crisis, and education is off-limits to girls 13 to 18 years old.

Why did Russia invade Afghanistan? ›

The Soviets Upheld the 'Brezhnev Doctrine'

Even Dubček's modest steps away from hardcore communism offered reason enough for the Soviets to invade Czechoslovakia and abduct him. By 1979, Afghanistan, a faltering, once-friendly regime, provided another chance for the USSR to militarily enforce the Brezhnev doctrine.

Who is responsible for the most deaths in history? ›

But both Hitler and Stalin were outdone by Mao Zedong. From 1958 to 1962, his Great Leap Forward policy led to the deaths of up to 45 million people—easily making it the biggest episode of mass murder ever recorded.

How many Taliban died? ›

Dead: 52,893+ killed (estimate, no official data).
...
Taliban insurgency.
Date17 December 2001 – 15 August 2021 (19 years, 7 months, 4 weeks and 1 day)
LocationIslamic Republic of Afghanistan
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Did Queen Elizabeth and Churchill get along? ›

The pair who ruled during World War II enjoyed a deep and enduring friendship despite their differences. So strong was the relationship between the two that the Queen wrote the former prime minister a handwritten letter when he retired and broke protocol at his funeral.

How many words did Winston Churchill use in his writing? ›

The total for the eight biographic volumes is over 3,000,000 words. The twenty-three Companion or Document Volumes add 15.3 million, for a grand total of over 18 million words (80+ megabytes).

Who was Winston Churchill's best friend? ›

His abiding influence on Churchill stemmed from close personal friendship, as a member of the latter's country-house set.
...
Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell.
The Right Honourable The Viscount Cherwell CH PC FRS
Personal details
Born5 April 1886 Baden-Baden, German Empire
Died3 July 1957 (aged 71) Oxford, United Kingdom
Alma materUniversity of Berlin
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Is Kabul safe to visit? ›

Do not travel to Afghanistan due to armed conflict, civil unrest, crime, terrorism, and kidnapping. Travel to all areas of Afghanistan is unsafe and the risk of kidnapping or violence against U.S. citizens in Afghanistan is high.

Is child marriage legal in Afghanistan? ›

Child marriage in Afghanistan is common but illegal. The minimum age for marriage is 15 or 16 years old for women and 18 years old for men. In the past, many families opted for child marriages to pay back any personal debts, settle disputes, or create friendships with rival families to decrease their enemy count.

Can you still fly to Kabul? ›

We continue to advise against all travel to and within Afghanistan. Travel throughout Afghanistan is extremely dangerous. Violent incidents could occur across the country. Land borders may close to travellers seeking to cross from Afghanistan and border crossing points are at risk of terrorist attack.

What is longest war in history? ›

The longest war in history is believed to be the Reconquista (Spanish for Reconquest), with a duration of 781 years.

What was Afghanistan called before? ›

In the Middle Ages, up to the 18th century, the region was known as Khorāsān. Several important centers of Khorāsān are thus located in modern Afghanistan, such as Balkh, Herat, Ghazni and Kabul.

What countries are helping Afghanistan? ›

India, Pakistan, the UAE, Iran, Qatar, Turkey and other countries have also sent aid such as food, shelter and medical supplies.

Is Afghanistan a rich country? ›

Despite holding over one trillion dollars in proven untapped mineral deposits, Afghanistan remains one of the least developed countries in the world. Its unemployment rate is over 23% and about half of its population lives below the poverty line.

Is Afghanistan a poor country? ›

Afghanistan is one of the poorest countries in the world. In Afghanistan, poverty is widespread in rural and urban areas. However, it has been estimated that poverty in Afghanistan is mainly concentrated in rural areas. It has been estimated that four out of five poor people live in rural areas.

What is Afghanistan famous for? ›

Afghanistan is well known for its fine fruits, especially pomegranates, grapes, and its extra-sweet jumbo-size melons.

Did the US win the war in Afghanistan? ›

The American mission in Afghanistan has come to a tragic and chaotic end. The U.S. military departed the country on Aug. 30, a day ahead of schedule, ending a 20-year occupation and leaving Afghanistan in the Taliban's hands.

Did the US ever lost a war? ›

However, the US was unable to get any significant victory in its wars abroad. America fought five major wars after 1945 including Korea, Vietnam, Gulf War, Iraq, and Afghanistan in addition to some minor wars in Somalia, Yemen, and Libya. Except for the Gulf War in 1991, America lost all other wars.

How many wars has America won? ›

Victory may be asking a lot. Since 1945, the United States has very rarely achieved meaningful victory. The United States has fought five major wars — Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War, Iraq, Afghanistan — and only the Gulf War in 1991 can really be classified as a clear success.

What war did the US lose? ›

1. Vietnam War. The Vietnam War (1955-1975) is a black-marked event in the histories of both Vietnam and the United States, and one when the latter country, after losing thousands of soldiers in the war, was effectively badly defeated and forced to retreat.

Who defeated Russia in Afghanistan? ›

The Soviet–Afghan War (1979–1989) was a nine-year guerrilla war fought by insurgent groups known collectively as the Mujahideen, as well as smaller Maoist groups, against the military occupation of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union and their satellite state, the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan (DRA).

Why did America start the war in Afghanistan? ›

The United States went to Afghanistan in 2001 to wage a necessary war of self-defense. On September 11, 2001, al-Qaeda terrorists attacked our country. They were able to plan and execute such a horrific attack because their Taliban hosts had given them safe haven in Afghanistan.

What is Kabul called now? ›

Located in the eastern half of the country, it is also a municipality, forming part of the Kabul Province; it is administratively divided into 22 municipal districts. According to 2021 estimates, the population of Kabul was 4.6 million.
...
Kabul.
Kabul کابل (Pashto) کابل (Dari)
Websitekm.gov.af
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Who is in power in Afghanistan today? ›

The Taliban retook control of Afghanistan in 2021, two decades after being removed from power by a US-led military coalition.

How old is Afghanistan? ›

Afghanistan was settled around 7000 B.C. and has been in transition for most of its history. Alexander the Great conquered Afghanistan in 330 B.C. and brought the Greek language and culture to the region. Genghis Khan's Mongols invaded in the 13th century.

What did Churchill mean by the Iron Curtain? ›

The term “iron curtain” had been employed as a metaphor since the 19th century, but Churchill used it to refer specifically to the political, military, and ideological barrier created by the U.S.S.R.

What did Winston Churchill say? ›

Never Give In” “This is the lesson: never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never—in nothing, great or small, large or petty—never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense. Never yield to force; never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy.”

Did Winston Churchill cause the Bengal famine? ›

Even Mukerjee never blames Churchill for actually causing the Bengal Famine, but for compounding it by refusing to allow shipments of grain from Australia and Canada, bound for Europe, to be diverted to Bengal.

What was Winston Churchill's personality like? ›

Winston Churchill's Personality Type - Enneagram, 16-Personality (based on types by Jung, Myers, & Briggs), and DISC. Winston tends to be pragmatic, logical, and firm when making decisions but very skeptical when emotions are involved. As a Type Eight, Winston tends to be self-confident, powerful, and assertive.

What does fruits of war mean? ›

The desired product(s) or result(s) of an activity, effort, or situation. The fruit of the long and bitter negotiations has been a historic peace treaty that will see the end of a 50-year war.

What was Churchill's most famous speech? ›

Churchill's famed “Iron Curtain” speech ushered in the Cold War and made the term a household phrase.

Was Poland behind the Iron Curtain? ›

The Europan countries which were considered to be "behind the Iron Curtain" included: Poland, Estearn Germany, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania and the Soviet Union. From North Korea to Cuba more countries were separated from the West in the same sense.

What are two famous quotes from Winston Churchill? ›

Attitude is a little thing that makes a BIG difference.” “Success is not final, failure is not fatal, it is the courage to continue that counts.” “If you're going through hell, keep going.”

What did Winston Churchill say when Pearl Harbor was bombed? ›

Japan attacked the United States fleet at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on 7 December 1941. President Roosevelt cabled Churchill, "Today all of us are in the same boat...and it is a ship which will not and cannot be sunk." "That night," Churchill later recalled, "I slept the sleep of the saved and thankful."

When did Winston Churchill say never let a good crisis go to waste? ›

Churchill is credited with saying “Never let a good crisis go to waste” in the mid-1940s as the world approached the end of WW ll.

Did the British cause famine in India? ›

The Bengal famine stands as one of the single most horrific atrocities to have occurred under British colonial rule. From 1943 to 1944, more than three million Indians died of starvation and malnutrition, and millions more fell into crushing poverty.

Who was to blame for the Bengal famine? ›

New Delhi, India – The Bengal famine of 1943 estimated to have killed up to three million people was not caused by drought but instead was a result of a “complete policy failure” of the then-British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, a recent study has said.

How did the Bengal famine end? ›

The hardships that were felt by the rural population through a severe "cloth famine" were alleviated when military forces began distributing relief supplies between October 1942 and April 1943.

What made Churchill so great? ›

Churchill is best remembered for successfully leading Britain through World War Two. He was famous for his inspiring speeches, and for his refusal to give in, even when things were going badly. Many people consider him the greatest Briton of all time and he's almost certainly the most famous British prime minister.

What lessons in leadership can we learn from Churchill? ›

Among the lessons of Churchill's leadership:
  • Leaders Are Self-Created. ...
  • Courage is the First Virtue. ...
  • Vision Can be Transmitted Faithfully through a Romantic Lens. ...
  • Insight is Superior to Intellect. ...
  • Apply History to Illuminate the Present and Future. ...
  • Master the Written Word. ...
  • Master the Spoken Word.
Nov 30, 2021

How many words did Winston Churchill use in his writing? ›

The total for the eight biographic volumes is over 3,000,000 words. The twenty-three Companion or Document Volumes add 15.3 million, for a grand total of over 18 million words (80+ megabytes).

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